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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
1

The effects of creative drama-based intervention for children with deficits in social perception

Guli, Laura Ann, Semrud-Clikeman, Margaret, January 2004 (has links) (PDF)
Thesis (Ph. D.)--University of Texas at Austin, 2004. / Supervisor: Margaret Semrud-Clikeman. Vita. Includes bibliographical references.
2

Social-cognitive predictors of reactive and proactive aggression investigation in a diverse, urban 5th grade sample /

McCarthy, Shauna K. January 2005 (has links)
Thesis (M.A.)--Bowling Green State University, 2005. / Document formatted into pages; contains viii, 123 p. Includes bibliographical references.
3

Neuropsychological functioning in subgroups of children with and without social perception deficits and/or hyperactivity/impulsivity

Schafer, Vickie Ann, Semrud-Clikeman, Margaret, January 2002 (has links)
Thesis (Ph. D.)--University of Texas at Austin, 2002. / Supervisor: Margaret Semrud-Clikeman. Vita. Includes bibliographical references. Also available from UMI.
4

Children's understanding of social interaction

Flapan, Dorothy. January 1965 (has links)
Thesis--Columbia University. / Bibliography: leaves 124-126.
5

The effects of creative drama-based intervention for children with deficits in social perception

Guli, Laura Ann, January 2004 (has links)
Thesis (Ph. D.)--University of Texas at Austin, 2004. / Includes bibliographical references.
6

CHILDBIRTH THROUGH CHILDREN'S EYES

Anderson, Sandra VanDam, 1943- January 1983 (has links)
The purpose of this study is to describe six-to twelve-year-old children's views of childbirth using words and drawings of children who were present when a baby was born in order to understand children's conceptualization of birth. As background to the study, the accessibility of childbirth to children through time and space was reviewed in the Human Relations Area Files. The information revealed cultural units both allowing and forbidding attendance of children at birth. Interviews and drawings were used to collect data from 14 informants. Audiotape-recordings of the interviews were transcribed, analyzed and organized into meaningful categories, which were validated by six key informants. The categories represented the knowledge used by children to interpret childbirth and included: people who do things at birth, steps in a baby being born, things people do at birth, best parts of being there, worst parts of being there, things that are gross at birth, things that are scary at birth, and things for kids to know about being there. The relationships of the categories were discussed in themes inferred from the data by the researcher. The themes identified were: I never seen it before; the first time you don't know; it might not be scary for you, but it was for me; the more often you see it, the less it bothers you; dads, kids and ladies help; I can't stand to miss it; it's kind of gross for the person who has to watch; and you learn by being there. The themes are discussed in relation to the research questions, health care and concepts that guided the study (childbirth as a sociocultural event, culture of childhood, child's-eye view, and cognitive development). Health professionals, especially nurses, have the opportunity to prepare parents and children for birth, to facilitate family-centered birthing practices and to minimize the strains related to life processes, such as birth and development. Childbirth through children's eyes communicates the birth event as a situational crisis as well as a developmental opportunity.
7

Infants' perception of emotions in music and social cognition. / Music and social cognition

January 2012 (has links)
已有文獻指出幼兒能夠根據他人的意圖、慾望和信念以解釋對方的行為。本硏究的主要目的為探究幼兒能否理解音樂所傳達的情緒以及能否運用情緒來推測對方的行為,並了解這兩種能力之間的關係。在第一項測試中,我們用了Phillip et al.(2002)的注視時間飾演方範式(looking-time paradigm)來測試幼兒能否透過觀察他人的情緒(包括面部表情及說話)來推斷他的行為。在此項測試中,幼兒會觀看兩種情景(一)實驗人員首先會笑著面向物件甲說話,跟著手抱該物件(一致的情況);(二)實驗人員首先會笑著面向物件甲說話,但接著手抱另一物件(不一致的情況)。因為在不一致的情況下實驗人員的面部表情與她的行為不協調,假若幼兒能夠理解實驗人員的情緒與行為之間的關係,幼兒將會對這種情況比較感到驚訝,因而注視時間會較長。在另一項測試中,我們運用了跨感官比對飾演方範式(intermodal matching paradigm)來探究幼兒能否理解音樂所表達的情緒。我們在播放開心的音樂之後,幼兒同樣地會觀看兩種情景:(一)螢幕中的實驗人員面露笑容地講話(一致的情況);(二)螢幕中的實驗人員面帶哀傷地說話(不一致的情況)。由於在不一致的情況下音樂傳達的情緒與實驗人員的面部表情不相符,如果幼兒能夠理解音樂中的情緒,他們對這種情況的注視時間將會較長。此外,鑬於幼兒的語言能力與理解他人的行為及想法有著密切的關連,我們亦要求家長填寫《漢語溝通發展量表》來評估幼兒的語言溝通能力。是次硏究對象為三十五名十八個月大幼兒(平均年齡為十八月及四天)。硏究結果顯示,(一)當實驗人員對一件物件面露笑容時,她便會手握該物件;(二)當實驗人員聽到開心的音樂時,她會面露笑容;相反,當她聽到悲傷的音樂時她便會愁眉苦臉。結果亦顯示幼兒在以上兩項測試中的表現並沒有正向的關聯,即與我們的假設不相符。由於我們認為次序效應(order effect)影響了本硏究的結果,因此我們建議在量度幼兒對音樂中的情緒之理解,以及對情緒與行為之間的關係的理解應作出適當的修改。總括而言,是次硏究把動作及視覺經驗延伸至聽覺經驗,以及由理解意向和信念延伸至理解情緒,因此本硏究對了解自身經驗和理解他人行為及想法之間的關係潛在莫大的貢獻。 / Prior studies demonstrated infants’ precocious mentalistic reasoning of attributing others’ behaviours to intentions, desires and beliefs. However, fewer studies looked at infants’ interpretation of behaviours in terms of agents’ emotional expressions. The present study examined the relationship between infants’ perception of emotions in music and their understanding of behaviours as motivated by emotional states. In Task 1, we adapted Phillips et al.’s (2002) looking-time paradigm to assess infants’ use of emotional information to predict agent’s action. Infants were shown an actress with positive emotional-visual regard directed towards one object and subsequently grasping the same object (consistent event) or the other one (inconsistent event). If infants appreciated the connection between actress’ affect and her action, they should show greater novelty response to inconsistent events in which the actress’ expressed emotion contradicted the expected action. In Task 2, an intermodal matching paradigm was used to test whether infants are sensitive to emotions conveyed in music. We exposed infants to happy or sad music and later showed them an actress portraying either happy or sad dynamic facial expressions on a monitor. If they could discern the emotions embedded in the musical excerpts, they should look longer when the actress’ posed emotion is inconsistent with the emotion represented in the music. Parental report of language skills as measured by the Mac-Arthur Bates Communicative Development Inventories was also obtained to partial out the effect of language ability on psychological reasoning. Results from 35 18-month-olds (M = 18 months 4 days) revealed that as a group (a) they recognized that the actress tended to grasp the object with which she had positively regarded previously, and (b) they appreciated that the actress tended to show happy face upon hearing positive music excerpts whereas sad facial expression was displayed when listening to sad music. Contrary to our hypothesis, we failed to find a positive correlation between these two conceptual understanding. We speculate that the result was obscured by order effects, and suggestions have been proposed to ameliorate the measurement of infants’ looking preferences as reflecting their conceptual understanding. Despite the null result, the current study is potentially significant in corroborating the role of first-person experience in social cognition by extending from motor and visual experience to auditory experience on the one hand, as well as from intention and belief attribution to emotion attribution on the other. / Detailed summary in vernacular field only. / Siu, Tik Sze Carrey. / Thesis (M.Phil.)--Chinese University of Hong Kong, 2012. / Includes bibliographical references (leaves 62-84). / Abstracts also in Chinese. / Introduction --- p.11 / Infants’ Early Psychological Reasoning --- p.11 / Self-experience as a Mechanism underlying Infants’ Psychological Reasoning --- p.14 / Infants’ Attribution of Behaviours to Emotions --- p.17 / Music as a Language of Emotions --- p.23 / The Perception of Emotions in Music among Young Children and Infants --- p.25 / The Hypothesis of the Present Study --- p.29 / Method --- p.32 / Participants --- p.32 / Apparatus and Materials --- p.33 / Chapter Task 1 --- : Ability to predict agent’s action based on expressed emotion --- p.33 / Chapter Task 2 --- : Ability to decode emotions in music --- p.33 / Musical stimuli --- p.33 / Facial expressions --- p.34 / The MacArthur-Bates Communicative Development Inventories --- p.35 / Procedure --- p.36 / Chapter Task 1 --- : Ability to predict agent’s action based on expressed emotion --- p.36 / Chapter Task 2 --- : Ability to decode emotions in music --- p.38 / Reliability Coding --- p.39 / Results --- p.41 / Chapter Task 1 --- : Ability to Predict Agent’s Action Based upon Expressed Emotion --- p.41 / Familiarization --- p.41 / Test events --- p.41 / Chapter Task 2 --- : Ability to Decode Emotions in Music --- p.42 / 42 / Test events --- p.42 / The Link between Task 1 and Task 2 --- p.43 / Discussion --- p.46 / Limitations and Further Research --- p.53 / Significance and Implications --- p.59 / Conclusion --- p.60 / References --- p.62 / Appendices --- p.85 / Table --- p.85 / Figures --- p.86
8

Stepping stones to others� minds : the relation between maternal mental and non-mental state input and social understanding in 15-,24, and 33 month-old children

Taumoepeau, Mele Ma'ata, n/a January 2006 (has links)
Recent research has shown that children under two years demonstrate some early social understanding. Previous research has also demonstrated that mother talk about mental states is a factor in older preschoolers� later theory of mind understanding. In order to learn more about the predictive nature of mother mental state talk to very young children, this study examined the relation between mother talk about mental states at 15 and 24 months and their later mental state language and emotion understanding at 24 and 33 months. At all three time points, 71 mothers and 3 fathers (N=74) described pictures to their infants and mother talk was coded for mental and non-mental state language at 15, 24 and 33 months. In addition, at all three time points, children�s mental and non-mental state vocabulary levels were obtained via parental report. At the second and third time points the children were administered an emotion situation and a body emotion task. The mothers� ability to interpret emotion faces was also assessed. The results showed that mother use of desire language was more prevalent at 15 months, with references to thinking and knowledge increasing at 24 months. Partial correlations demonstrated that mother use of desire language with 15-month old children uniquely predicted a child�s mental state language and emotion situation task performance at 24 months, even after accounting for earlier child language, mother socioeconomic status, mothers� own emotion understanding, and other types of mother non-mental state language. Similarly, at 24 months of age, after accounting for potentially confounding variables, such as child language, mother use of think/know language as well as desire language were both predictors of children�s mental state language and emotion task performance at 33 months. The results further demonstrated that mothers� tendency to refer to the child�s (versus others�) desires at 15 months was the more consistent correlate of children�s mental state language and emotion understanding at 24 months. At 24 months a different pattern emerged with both references to the child�s and others� thoughts and knowledge correlating with child mental state language and emotion task performance at 33 months. It is proposed that Vygotsky�s zone of proximal development provides a framework within which maternal talk about specific mental states scaffolds the development of children�s later social understanding. I also suggest that such scaffolding motivates mothers to talk more about the child�s mental states when they are younger, before introducing talk that focuses on others� mental states.
9

The effects of creative drama-based intervention for children with deficits in social perception

Guli, Laura Ann 28 August 2008 (has links)
Not available / text
10

Neuropsychological functioning in subgroups of children with and without social perception deficits and/or hyperactivity/impulsivity

Schafer, Vickie Ann, 1972- 23 May 2011 (has links)
Not available / text

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