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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
1

An empirical investigation of maintainer behaviour occurring during software maintenance

Parkin, Peter, Information Systems, Technology & Management, Australian School of Business, UNSW January 2005 (has links)
In recent years many tools and techniques have been proposed and even implemented which support maintenance programmers to gain an understanding of existing source code. However, studies have found that some tools are of marginal benefit and not appropriate for all maintenance tasks. This may be due to tools having been designed with little regard to the common behavioural practices that occur during software maintenance tasks because the current state of knowledge of such practices is quite limited. The aim of this study is to alleviate the above situation by performing a detailed behavioural analysis of software maintenance tasks undertaken under laboratory experiment conditions. To support this aim an experiment was conducted in which twenty-nine student subjects experienced in C programming independently undertook one of two maintenance tasks on the same C program in a university environment. The data produced from the experiment included subjects??? interactions with documents and code and their responses to program comprehension questions at the end of the task. The results indicate that maintenance task success is associated with a heightened concentration on high-level procedures that control the execution of lower level procedures. Among subjects, IT industry experience was linked to efficient comprehension of program and task documentation and the performance of more code searches. In general, code searches mainly involved searches for procedure name references. Compared to subjects undertaking the enhancement task, subjects performing the complex corrective task utilised program documentation more but also obtained a greater understanding of the elementary operations and control-flow of the program. In addition, this study illustrates a method to identify common information usage strategies from the recorded maintenance behaviour of subjects. Largely unsuccessful attempts were also made to sequentially analyse maintenance behaviour. This lack of success is possibly attributable to the as-needed comprehension approach adopted by subjects. The results of this research suggest that cost-effective maintenance of software is best supported using tools implementing facilities for feature location and visualisation of the control-flow of a program. The former facility would be most helpful to maintainers undertaking corrections, whereas the latter would particularly assist maintainers undertaking enhancements.
2

An empirical investigation of maintainer behaviour occurring during software maintenance

Parkin, Peter, Information Systems, Technology & Management, Australian School of Business, UNSW January 2005 (has links)
In recent years many tools and techniques have been proposed and even implemented which support maintenance programmers to gain an understanding of existing source code. However, studies have found that some tools are of marginal benefit and not appropriate for all maintenance tasks. This may be due to tools having been designed with little regard to the common behavioural practices that occur during software maintenance tasks because the current state of knowledge of such practices is quite limited. The aim of this study is to alleviate the above situation by performing a detailed behavioural analysis of software maintenance tasks undertaken under laboratory experiment conditions. To support this aim an experiment was conducted in which twenty-nine student subjects experienced in C programming independently undertook one of two maintenance tasks on the same C program in a university environment. The data produced from the experiment included subjects??? interactions with documents and code and their responses to program comprehension questions at the end of the task. The results indicate that maintenance task success is associated with a heightened concentration on high-level procedures that control the execution of lower level procedures. Among subjects, IT industry experience was linked to efficient comprehension of program and task documentation and the performance of more code searches. In general, code searches mainly involved searches for procedure name references. Compared to subjects undertaking the enhancement task, subjects performing the complex corrective task utilised program documentation more but also obtained a greater understanding of the elementary operations and control-flow of the program. In addition, this study illustrates a method to identify common information usage strategies from the recorded maintenance behaviour of subjects. Largely unsuccessful attempts were also made to sequentially analyse maintenance behaviour. This lack of success is possibly attributable to the as-needed comprehension approach adopted by subjects. The results of this research suggest that cost-effective maintenance of software is best supported using tools implementing facilities for feature location and visualisation of the control-flow of a program. The former facility would be most helpful to maintainers undertaking corrections, whereas the latter would particularly assist maintainers undertaking enhancements.
3

Path-based dynamic impact analysis /

Law, James January 1900 (has links)
Thesis (Ph. D.)--Oregon State University, 2006. / Printout. Includes bibliographical references (leaves 187-208). Also available on the World Wide Web.
4

An algebraic model of software evolution /

Keller, Benjamin J., January 1990 (has links)
Thesis (M.S.)--Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, 1990. / Vita. Abstract. Includes bibliographical references (leaves 96-101). Also available via the Internet.
5

Comprehensive forecasting of software integrity in C I systems /

Hirschman, Edward, January 1992 (has links)
Report (M.S.)--Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University. M.S. 1992. / Vita. Abstract. Includes bibliographical references (leaves 93-94). Also available via the Internet.
6

An integrated approach to software process assessment /

Henry, Joel. January 1993 (has links)
Thesis (Ph. D.)--Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, 1993. / Vita. Abstract. Includes bibliographical references (leaves 105-109). Also available via the Internet.
7

A first step toward the creation of a software maintenance process /

Martinez, Angel R. January 1994 (has links)
Report (M.S.)--Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, 1994. / Abstract. Includes bibliographical references (leaves 147-152). Also available via the Internet.
8

Supporting library interface changes in open system software evolution /

Chow, Kingsum. January 1996 (has links)
Thesis (Ph. D.)--University of Washington, 1996. / Vita. Includes bibliographical references (p. [140]-149).
9

End-user documentation

Wilkinson, Paul Johnston January 2003 (has links)
The first and most basic problem with documentation is that the consumer of software applications does not want to use the documentation included with a software product for one or more reasons. Studies, and papers, have been done on the effect that documentation has on a user's satisfaction with a software application; its ease of use, how quickly a user can learn to use the application, and on how documentation should be standardized. The premise of this thesis is that an improvement to the software maintenance processes can be achieved by limiting maintenance requests to "actual” problems with software, versus "perceived" problems caused by inadequate end-user documentation. After analyzing the literature within the computer science communities on the software maintenance process, and the literature within the educational and psychological communities on learning, retention, and the effect of software documentation on the end-user, a modification to the Foster Model was conceived. This model incorporates the concept of an Interactive Documentation Program (IDP), which allows for the end-user to utilize end-user directed and task-based documentation to improve their skills with the operation of commercially available off-the-shelf "office application" software as well as in-house developed software of a similar nature. To ascertain the viability of this concept, a world-wide survey of end-users is concerning their needs, desires, expectations, and complaints concerning end-user documentation was conducted. Combining the statistical results of the analysis of this survey with the concept of the IDP resulted in a new visuaUy-based and task oriented documentation paradigm called hypervideo.
10

Connecting software design principles to source code for improved ease of change /

Sazawal, Vibha. January 2005 (has links)
Thesis (Ph. D.)--University of Washington, 2005. / Vita. Includes bibliographical references (p. 135-143).

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