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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
1

Chemical aspects of fertility in Kangaroo Island soils /

Tyson, Angus George. January 1900 (has links) (PDF)
Thesis (M.Sc.) --University of Adelaide, 1953? / Typewritten copy.
2

Slash and char as alternative to slash and burn : soil charcoal amendments maintain soil fertility and establish a carbon sink /

Steiner, Christoph. January 2007 (has links)
Thesis (Ph. D.?)--Universitat Bayreuth, 2006.
3

Diffusive gradients in thin films (DGT) as a technique to predict nutrient availability to plants

Mason, Sean David January 2007 (has links)
The soils of Australia have extensive macro and micronutrient disorders varying greatly in their capacities to provide the chemical nutrients essential for plant growth. Assessment of nutrient availability in soils is important in order to maximise fertilizer efficiency and crop yields and to minimise environmental pollution associated with over fertilisation. Nutrient availability has proven difficult to assess due to the complexity of trace element soil chemistry and plant uptake mechanisms. The relatively new method, Diffusive Gradients in Thin Films ( DGT ), provides the potential to become an alternative soil test that could accurately predict nutrient availability. To date, DGT technology has only been designed for separate assessment of anionic and cationic species in waters or soils typically at concentrations characteristic of highly contaminated systems. In this study a new mixed binding gel ( MBL ) was developed capable of simultaneous assessment of cations and anions in a single assay at concentrations more representative of uncontaminated agricultural soils, sediments and waters. The MBL has the potential to eliminate measurement errors associated with very fine spatial scale changes in element concentrations in these environments. The MBL consisted of ferrihydrite and Chelex - 100 cation exchange resin combined together in a binding gel. Results from the MBL were comparable to experiments performed using individual Chelex gels and ferrihydrite gels that have been shown to work successfully for DGT methodology. To facilitate combined analysis of P and cations by ICP - MS, HCl ( 1 M ) was used for gel elution to minimise interferences from [superscript 14] N [superscript 16] OH or [superscript 15] N [superscript 16] O on [superscript 31] P. All elements tested ( Cd, Cu, Mn, Mo, P and Zn ) were bound successfully to the MBL. DGT measurements obtained using the MBL on agricultural soils correlated well ( r ? = 0.95 ) with measurements obtained using pure Chelex and ferrihydrite binding layers. This suggests that the MBL could be used for simultaneous measurement of cationic and anionic element availability in soils. Performance of the Diffusive Gradient in Thin Films ( DGT ) technique was compared with three other common testing methods ( Colwell, Olsen, Resin ) for available soil P in terms of the ability of each to predict wheat, canola, lupin and barley responsiveness to applied P on 21 Australian agricultural soils. DGT accurately predicted plant responsiveness in > 90 % of the soils used. In contrast the other soil testing methods failed to correctly predict plant response to P on numerous occasions. These observations reveal that the DGT technique with the newly developed MBL can predict plant available P on these soils with greater accuracy than other traditional soil P testing methods and could become a useful tool for predicting P fertilizer requirements. The DGT method using the MBL was also used to test Zn deficiency thresholds for canola and wheat in a manufactured soil ( acid washed sand ). DGT successfully determined the threshold for Zn deficiency in this soil, overcoming detection limit issues usually accompanying such low levels of Zn. This method also provides that potential to assess other micronutrients ( Mn, Cu ) and with further modification potentially assess K. Before DGT can become established as an alternative soil testing method, validation of the performance is required under field conditions. This study has shown that it out performs current common soil testing methods in glasshouse conditions but questions still remain if this will be reflected out in the field. / Thesis (Ph.D.)-- University of Adelaide, School of Earth and Environmental Sciences, 2007.

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