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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
1

Governing globalization in South Asia through a legal praxis of human rights, development and democracy

Tittawella, Suranjika Erangani. January 2008 (has links)
Thesis (Ph.D. Law)--University of Waikato, 2008. / Title from PDF cover (viewed January 5, 2009) Includes bibliographical references (p. 426-474)
2

Cultural construction of the 'Sinhala woman' and women's lives in post-independence Sri Lanka

Jayawardena, Janaki January 2002 (has links)
No description available.
3

The security implications of water prospects for instability or cooperation in South and Central Asia /

Radin, Adam J. January 2010 (has links) (PDF)
Thesis (M.A. in Security Studies (Middle East, South Asia, Sub-Saharan Africa))--Naval Postgraduate School, March 2010. / Thesis Advisor(s): Clunan, Anne L. ; Chatterjee, Anshu N. "March 2010." Description based on title screen as viewed on April 21, 2010. Author(s) subject terms: Security, South Asia, Central Asia, Environmental Conflict, Indus Water Treaty. Includes bibliographical references (p. 57-62). Also available in print.
4

Cross-cultural conflict analysis : the 'reality' of the British victory in the second Anglo-Maratha war, 1803-1805

Cooper, Randolf G. S. January 1992 (has links)
No description available.
5

The political determinants of fertility control policy in South Asia

Calder, John Gilchrist January 1982 (has links)
This thesis presents a comparison over time of the fertility control policies of India, Pakistan, Bangladesh, and Sri Lanka. It is a search for commonalities and idiosyncracies among the determinants of the three major elements of fertility policy, namely: (i) the fertility policy fact, (ii) shifts up or down in the vigour or coerciveness of fertility policy, and (iii) specific measures taken to control population growth on the subcontinent. The development of these policies is divisible into three distinct phases. In the first phase the appearance of fertility control on the public policy agenda is explained. The shift into the second phase -- in which government activity in these countries took a dramatic upturn — is then accounted for. This shift occurred when it became apparent that motivation of fertile couples was at least as important as providing them with the means to prevent conception, and was, accordingly, marked by a succession of "crash programmes" to attain both these objectives. In the third phase -- characterized by experimentation with policy concepts which go beyond the traditional practices of family planning -- India's experience with compulsion in fertility control policy is described and explained in contrast to her own and other countries' past policies. The whole range of determinants of these shifts and choices is divided into five categories of analysis: environment, power, ideas, institutions, and process. The most important of these is highlighted for each successive shift in policy direction. The thesis argues that the overall pattern of fertility control policy-making reveals that shifts in commitment occurred largely as a result of choices by individual leaders who responded to changes in the demographic and economic environments and, --in accordance with what they perceived to be politically feasible — attempted to affect that environment. / Arts, Faculty of / Political Science, Department of / Graduate
6

ARE REMITTANCES INFLATIONARY? EVIDENCE FROM EMERGING NATIONS IN SOUTH ASIA

Regmi, Sunder 01 August 2023 (has links) (PDF)
This paper examines the relationship between inflation and remittances as variable of interest and real interest rate & exchange rate as control variables. The main question this paper addresses is whether remittances induce inflationary pressures. This research uses pooled OLS, fixed effect method, random effect method and Arellano Bond GMM estimator for empirical analysis over 2008-2021 data of 7 emerging economies in South Asia. Comparing the methods and interpreting the result, I can say that there are mixed (positive, negative, and no significant) results whether remittances are inflationary.
7

Vers la Stabilité Stratégique en Asie du Sud

Gregory, Shaun R. January 2006 (has links)
No / Analysis of strategic stability in South Asia has been predominantly viewed through the bipolar Cold War prism of US-Soviet relations and has thus been insufficiently cognisant of the specificities of nuclear dynamics in South Asia. This paper argues that security analysis in South Asia needs to give attention to the economic, political and social factors which condition the core politico-military relationship as well as to that relationship itself. It argues further that nuclear dynamics in South Asia, characterised by asymmetries, may not play out as Cold War models would predict and consequently that there is a need for an agenda for the promotion of strategic stability which reflects the distinct dynamics of nuclear rivalry in South Asia (deterrence, command and control and arms control and confidence-building measures).
8

United States foreign policy in South Asia : the liberation struggle in Bangladesh and the Indo-Pakistan war of 1971

Chowdhury, Rashid A January 1989 (has links)
Typescript. / Thesis (Ph. D.)--University of Hawaii at Manoa, 1989. / Includes bibliographical references. / Microfiche. / xxiii, 298 leaves, bound ill. 29 cm
9

Eknath Remembered and Reformed: Bhakti, Brahmans, and Untouchables in Marathi Historiography

Keune, Jon Milton January 2011 (has links)
This dissertation investigates how stories about the Marathi sant-poet Eknath of Paithan (1533-1599) interacting with untouchables changed over the course of three centuries of textual repetition and dramatic representation. In tracing memories of Eknath over such time and through various Marathi public spheres, the dissertation sheds light on why Eknath has come to be viewed in complicated and conflicted ways in the present. This examination of stories, particularly as they pertain to inter-caste relations and the expression of a bhakti social outlook, offers a chance to view how understandings of devotional religion and caste changed in Maharashtrian society between 1700 and the present. At the heart of these stories is a narrative tension between Eknath's boundary-transgressing actions that are presented in spiritually egalitarian terms, and societal expectations about ritual purity and brahman-ness. I show that although the details of the stories change through various repetitions and renditions, this tension endures and produces an ambiguity in the narrative that (perhaps intentionally) makes Eknath's social allegiance impossible to determine. My sources for this study include hagiographical texts (ca. 1650-1800), biographical books and essays (1880-1925), and six major dramas and films (1903-2005) -- all of which richly portray aspects of Eknath's life, and nearly all of which are in Marathi. In the course of preparing this historiographical analysis, I introduce many Marathi sources to the English scholarly world for the first time and call attention to several historical texts and plays that have been forgotten or overlooked by Marathi scholars as well.
10

Making the Modern Slum: Housing, Mobility, and Poverty in Bombay and its Peripheries

Chhabria, Sheetal January 2012 (has links)
This dissertation examines the formation of urban poverty and slums which have long stigmatized South Asian cities. It focuses on the emergence of markets in housing through the 19th and early 20th centuries in Bombay primarily, and Karachi and Aden secondarily. It is the first historical study of slums, or poor and stigmatized housing, in colonial Western India. It critically engages with the terms of global urban modernity and the historiography of colonialism in South Asia, challenging the broader nationalist frames in which scholars have understood South Asia's poverty. While this is not a comparative project, the dissertation interrogates many of the implicit and explicit comparative claims that have been made about colonial cities and their legibility in the discourse on global slums. Housing was a visible marker of inequality on the urban landscape and therefore a useful site through which to examine the changing relations between migrants and settlers, laborers and capitalists, and society and the state. The changing political economy of Western India resulted in a laboring and urban poor whose housing issues became productive of regional, colonial, and national difference. By following circular migrants across city and country, this study builds on the subcontinent's Early Modern history of a pervasive rural-urban continuum of human networks. Everyday workers used their mobility and habitation practices to negotiate a changing world, bringing cities like Bombay, Karachi, and Aden into their routes of mobility to earn a livelihood. Increased opportunities combined with the intensification of production, market crises, growing demographic pressures on the land, and the spread of indebtedness to produce and reproduce inequality. This dissertation also compares the subsequent management of the urban poverty problem in cities across Western India, which heightened concerns over public health and sanitation. Newly financed poor housing initiatives sought to correct these at the turn of the century, but their limitations made modern slums. By addressing the eventual obfuscation of the once-transitioned status of the modern slum-dweller, this study delineates the bases for the conceptualization of a distinctive third world poverty and urban form.

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