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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
1

Spinal cord injury: early impact on the patient’s significant others

Hart, Geraldine Angela January 1978 (has links)
This exploratory study was designed to gather information about the needs and concerns of significant others of patients with recent spinal cord injuries. The respondents were asked about the impact of the patients' injuries on their own lives and about their feelings in relation to the treatment they and their patients were receiving from health care personnel. The study was conducted with a convenience sample of seven respondents, five women and two men, designated as significant others by seven patients with recent spinal cord injuries. Using a semi-structured interview guide each significant other was interviewed in depth from one to three times over a period of three to six weeks following their patient's injury. The interview guide covered eight selected themes relating to the significant other's': - need to feel that he or she is getting adequate information - need to feel that he or she is being helpful to the patient - need to feel able to cope with home and family responsibilities - need to have someone from whom he or she can obtain emotional support - need to express feelings, both positive and negative - need to feel that his or her patient is getting good care - past experiences and methods of coping with crisis situations - needs and concerns that may arise because of the likely major effects the patient's injury will have on the significant other's life in the future. All respondents reported needing initial access to physicians who would give a true report of their patients' medical conditions and progresses. Thereafter five respondents reported receiving adequate information from their patients or the nurses. The six respondents who were given a negative prognosis for their patients' recovery of function expressed less apparent emotional conflict than the one who was told there was some possibility of recovery. After the first interview three respondents stressed the need for practical information about how to help with their patients' physical care, although during the first interview all respondents expressed fear that any physical assistance they attempted might harm their patients. All respondents felt their greatest value to their patients was as a source of emotional support. Two respondents reported being able to defer all home and family responsibilities; the other five stated their home and family responsibilities were not directly increased by their patients' injuries. However these five reported stress caused by the necessity of coping with the patients' needs as well as home and family responsibilities. All seven significant others reported using some sources of external support, the most common being family members and close friends. All respondents voiced positive feelings about their patients and the health care they were receiving. Only three respondents expressed strong negative feelings which were directed at the cause of their patients' injuries or what they perceived as incorrect or inappropriate information given to them by health care personnel. All respondents stressed their need to know their patients were receiving good care. All significant others reported their patients' injuries were the severest crises they or their patients had ever undergone, but all also stated they believed they would be able to cope with the crisis. The respondents reported their patients' gravest concerns for the future related to finances, work and sexual functioning. The respondents themselves voiced less concern about finances and sexual functioning. Other concerns for the future expressed by the respondents related to housing, transportation, family activities, social relationships and coping with the inevitable "ups and downs" of the patients. There were some differences in concerns expressed by male and female respondents. The findings of the study demonstrated the presence of selected needs and concerns in a small convenience sample of significant others of spinal cord injured patients. Further research would be necessary to determine whether the findings are representative and whether there is a relationship between expressed needs and concerns and the sex of patients and/or significant others. The study offers suggestions to practicing nurses who wish to improve their care of spinal cord injured patients and their significant others. / Applied Science, Faculty of / Nursing, School of / Graduate
2

Factors that influence functional ability in individuals with spinal cord injury.

Hastings, Bronwyn Meloney 25 April 2014 (has links)
There is a dearth of published literature that documents the levels of functional ability post spinal cord injury (SCI) resulting in paraplegia, at discharge from in-patient rehabilitation facilities within Gauteng. In addition, the factors that influence functional ability are poorly defined in individuals with paraplegia, at their discharge from in-patient rehabilitation facilities in Gauteng. This necessitated further investigation since it is vital for the rehabilitation of individuals with SCI resulting in paraplegia. The aim of the study was to determine the functional ability and the factors that affect the functional ability in individuals with a SCI resulting in paraplegia, at discharge from rehabilitation facilities in Gauteng. The first objective of the study was to establish the level of functional ability in patients with SCI at discharge from in-patient rehabilitation. The second objective of the study was to describe the physical and demographic factors of the study population. The third objective of the study was to establish the demographic and physical factors that influence the level of functional ability in patients with SCI at discharge from in-patient rehabilitation. This was a cross-sectional, observational study design. Three instruments were used in this study: a self-designed questionnaire to establish the factors that influence the level of functional ability in patients with SCI at discharge from an in-patient rehabilitation unit; the American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA) classification scale of neurological impairment to describe the level and completeness of the lesion and the Spinal Cord Independence Measure III (SCIM III) to determine the level of functional ability. The main results of the study were as follows: The average SCIM score in this population was 64.6 (±27.6) with the lowest score being 20 and the highest score being 84. Participants with non traumatic SCI had 16.87% lower SCIM scores than those with traumatic SCI. After multivariate analysis the following factors were found to influence function: For every one year increase in the age of the participant, there was 0.18% decrease in the SCIM score. For every day increase in LOS, there was a corresponding increase of 0.06% in the SCIM score. With respect to the presence of a pressure sore from the acute hospital, those who had pressure sores had 9% lower SCIM scores than those who did not have pressure sores. Participants with spasticity had 8.3% lower SCIM scores relative to those that did not have spasticity. Relative to participants in government funding classification, workman’s compensation participants had 4.82% lower SCIM score followed by the medical aid participants with 8.07% lower SCIM and the private participants with 10.84% lower SCIM scores. For every unit increase in the ASIA motor score, there was an increase of 1.29% in the SCIM score. Conclusion: Majority of the participants in this study were discharged from rehabilitation without reaching functional independence. The following categories of patients with SCI may need to be monitored more for functional outcomes during rehabilitation and assisted in order to attain good functional ability: older age, a short rehabilitation length of stay, funded privately, a low ASIA motor score, having a pressure sore or spasticity, and higher level of SCI. Key words: Functional outcomes, paraplegia, rehabilitation, neurological level, spinal cord injury.
3

Effects of locomotor training on the psychosocial adaptation of persons with incomplete spinal cord injury

Hannold, Elizabeth Marie. January 2004 (has links)
Thesis (Ph.D.)--University of Florida, 2004. / Typescript. Title from title page of source document. Document formatted into pages; contains 244 pages. Includes Vita. Includes bibliographical references.
4

Identification of activities critical to examine the need for personal attendant care for individuals with spinal cord injury

Pomeranz, Jamie L. January 2005 (has links)
Thesis (Ph.D.)--University of Florida, 2005. / Typescript. Title from title page of source document. Document formatted into pages; contains 198 pages. Includes Vita. Includes bibliographical references.
5

Paediatric spinal cord injury in motor vehicle accidents : a prospective postmortem study of 33 cases of paediatric motor vehicle victims

Fowler, David R 03 April 2017 (has links)
No description available.
6

A behavior modification approach to nursing therapeutics in the care of spinal cord-injured patients an experimental nursing study /

Rottkamp, Barbara Catherine, January 1975 (has links)
Thesis (Ed. D.)--Columbia University. / eContent provider-neutral record in process. Description based on print version record. Includes bibliographical references (leaves 182-192).
7

A behavior modification approach to nursing therapeutics in the care of spinal cord-injured patients an experimental nursing study /

Rottkamp, Barbara Catherine, January 1975 (has links)
Thesis (Ed. D.)--Columbia University. / Includes bibliographical references (leaves 182-192).
8

The life pattern of people with spinal cord injury /

Alligood, Ronald R., January 2006 (has links)
Thesis (Ph. D.)--Virginia Commonwealth University, 2006. / Prepared for: School of Nursing. Bibliography: leaves 165-183. Also available online via the Internet.
9

The Stockholm - Thessaloniki acute traumatic spinal cord injury study

Divanoglou, Anestis, January 2010 (has links)
Diss. (sammanfattning) Stockholm : Karolinska institutet, 2010.
10

Cellular and molecular strategies to overcome macrophage-mediated axonal dieback after spinal cord injury

Busch, Sarah Ann. January 2009 (has links)
Thesis (Ph. D.)--Case Western Reserve University, 2009. / [School of Medicine] Department of Neurosciences. Includes bibliographical references.

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