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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
11

Land cover at northern spotted owl nest and non-nest sites, east-central Coast Ranges, Oregon /

Perkins, John P. January 1900 (has links)
Thesis (M.S.)--Oregon State University, 2001. / Typescript (photocopy). Includes bibliographical references (leaves 71-76). Also available on the World Wide Web.
12

The range expansion of the northern barred owl : an evaluation of the impact on spotted owls /

Kelly, Elizabeth G. January 2001 (has links)
Thesis (M.S.)--Oregon State University, 2002. / Typescript (photocopy). Includes bibliographical references (leaves 41-44). Also available via the World Wide Web.
13

Mexican Spotted Owl reproduction, home range, and habitat associations in Grand Canyon National Park /

Bowden, Timothy Scott. January 2008 (has links) (PDF)
Thesis (MS )--Montana State University--Bozeman, 2008. / Typescript. Chairperson, Graduate Committee: Mark L. Taper. Includes bibliographical references (leaves 60-68).
14

Mexican Spotted Owl reproduction, home range, and habitat associations in Grand Canyon National Park

Bowden, Timothy Scott. January 2008 (has links) (PDF)
Thesis (MS )--Montana State University--Bozeman, 2008. / Typescript. Chairperson, Graduate Committee: Mark L. Taper. Includes bibliographical references (leaves 60-68).
15

Landscape composition around northern spotted owl nests, central Cascade Mountains, Oregon

Swindle, Keith A. 16 October 1997 (has links)
This study describes the composition of forest landscapes surrounding northern spotted owl (Strix occidentalis caurina) nests in the central Cascade Mountains of Oregon. I compared forest composition around 126 owl nests in 70 pair territories with forest composition around 119 points drawn randomly from all terrestrial cover-types, and around 104 points drawn randomly from the old-forest (closed canopy, > 80 yrs) cover type. All nest sites and random points were drawn from U.S. Forest Service lands and were not drawn from privately owned lands or Wilderness Areas. Forest cover was classified on a Landsat Thematic Mapper image. I quantified the percentage of old-forest within 200 concentric circular plots (0.04-5.0-km radii), centered on each analyzed point, using a geographic information system. I used logistic regression to make spatially-explicit inferences. Owl nests were surrounded by more old-forest when compared to points drawn randomly from all terrestrial cover types: there was significantly (P<0.05) more old-forest around the owl nests in plots as large as 1.79 km in radius. When compared to points drawn randomly from the old-forest cover type, owl nests were surrounded by significantly (P<0.05) more old-forest in plots with 0.17-0.80-km radii. Exploratory analyses suggest that the landscape scales most pertinent to northern spotted owl nest site positioning in this study area appear to be (in descending order): the surrounding 10-15 ha (~200-m radius), the surrounding 25-30 ha (~300-m radius), the surrounding 200 ha (800-m radius), and possibly the surrounding 700 ha (1,500-m radius). This study supports the assertion that northern spotted owls are strongly associated with older forests. The results also indicate that owl nests are most associated with higher proportions of old-forest near the nest implying that the arrangement of habitat is important for nest-site selection/positioning Since spotted owls in the central Cascade Mountains of Oregon are known to have home-ranges that average 1,769 ha, it is important to recognize that these results apply to nest-site selection/positioning on the landscape and not to the amount of habitat necessary for pair persistence or successful reproduction. / Graduation date: 1998
16

Competitive interactions and resource partitioning between northern spotted owls and barred owls in western Oregon

Wiens, J. David 02 March 2012 (has links)
The federally threatened northern spotted owl (Strix occidentalis caurina) is the focus of intensive conservation efforts that have led to much forested land being reserved as habitat for the owl and associated wildlife species throughout the Pacific Northwest of the United States. Recently, however, a relatively new threat to spotted owls has emerged in the form of an invasive competitor: the congeneric barred owl (Strix varia). As barred owls have rapidly expanded their populations into the entire range of the northern spotted owl, mounting evidence indicates that they are displacing, hybridizing with, and even killing spotted owls. The barred owl invasion into western North America has made an already complex conservation issue even more contentious, and a lack of information on the ecological relationships between the 2 species has hampered conservation efforts. During 2007–2009 I investigated spatial relationships, habitat selection, diets, survival, and reproduction of sympatric spotted owls and barred owls in western Oregon, USA. My overall objective was to determine the potential for and possible consequences of competition for space, habitat, and food between the 2 species. My study included 29 spotted owls and 28 barred owls that were radio-marked in 36 neighboring territories and monitored over a 24-month tracking period. Based on repeated surveys of both species, the number of territories occupied by pairs of barred owls in the 745 km² study area (82) greatly outnumbered those occupied by pairs of spotted owls (15). Estimates of mean size of home-ranges and core-use areas of spotted owls (1,843 ha and 305 ha, respectively) were 2–4 times larger than those of barred owls (581 ha and 188 ha, respectively). Individual spotted and barred owls in adjacent territories often had overlapping home ranges, but inter-specific space sharing was largely restricted to broader foraging areas in the home range with minimal spatial overlap among core-use areas. I used an information-theoretic approach to rank discrete choice models representing alternative hypotheses about the influence of forest conditions and interspecific interactions on species-specific patterns of nighttime habitat selection. Spotted owls spent a disproportionate amount of time foraging on steep slopes in ravines dominated by old (>120 yrs old) conifer trees. Barred owls used available forest types more evenly than spotted owls, and were most strongly associated with patches of large hardwood and conifer trees that occupied relatively flat areas along streams. Spotted and barred owls differed in the relative use of old conifer forest (higher for spotted owls) and slope conditions (steeper slopes for spotted owls). I found no evidence that the 2 species differed in their use of young, mature, and riparian-hardwood forest types, and both species avoided forest-nonforest edges. The best resource selection function for spotted owls indicated that the relative probability of a location being selected was reduced if the location was within or in close proximity to a core-use area of a barred owl. I used pellet analysis and measures of food niche overlap to examine the potential for dietary competition between spatially associated pairs of spotted owls and barred owls. I identified 1,223 prey items from 15 territories occupied by pairs of spotted owls and 4,299 prey items from 24 territories occupied by pairs of barred owls. Diets of both species were dominated by nocturnal mammals, but diets of barred owls included many terrestrial, aquatic, and diurnal prey species that were rare or absent in diets of spotted owls. Northern flying squirrels (Glaucomys sabrinus), woodrats (Neotoma fuscipes, N. cinerea), and lagomorphs (Lepus americanus, Sylvilagus bachmani) were particularly important prey for both owl species, accounting for 81% and 49% of total dietary biomass for spotted owls and barred owls, respectively. Dietary overlap between pairs of spotted and barred owls in adjacent territories ranged from 28–70% (mean = 42%) In addition to overlap in resource use, I also identified strong associations between the presence of barred owls and the behavior of spotted owls, as shown by changes in space-use, habitat selection, and reproductive output of spotted owls exposed to different levels of spatial overlap with barred owls in adjacent territories. Barred owls in my study area displayed both numeric and demographic superiority over spotted owls; the annual survival probability of radio-marked spotted owls from known-fate analyses (0.81, SE = 0.05) was lower than that of barred owls (0.92, SE = 0.04), and barred owls produced over 6 times as many young over a 3-year period as spotted owls. Survival of both species was positively associated with an increasing proportion of old (>120 yrs old) conifer forest within the home range, which suggested that availability of old forest was a potential limiting factor in the competitive relationship between the 2 species. When viewed collectively, my results support the hypothesis that interference competition with a high density of barred owls for territorial space can act to constrain the availability of critical resources required for successful recruitment and reproduction of spotted owls. My findings have broad implications for the conservation of spotted owls, as they suggest that spatial heterogeneity in survival and reproduction may arise not only because of differences among territories in the quality of forest habitat, but also because of the spatial distribution of an invasive competitor. / Graduation date: 2012 / This pdf will not be made available until April 12th, 2012.
17

Spotted owls, great horned owls, and forest fragmentation in the central Oregon Cascades

Johnson, David Harold, 1956- 12 June 1992 (has links)
Graduation date: 1993
18

Managing for Multiple Objectives in Southwestern Forests: Evaluating the Trade-offs between Enhancing Mexican Spotted Owl Nest Habitat and Mitigating Potential Crown Fire

Deane McKenna, Daniel C. 01 May 2018 (has links)
The Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA), the United States’ forest census, measured sixty-six Mexican spotted owl nest stands in order gain insight into the structure and composition of the nest habitat of this threatened species. I used these data, along with the greater FIA database and the Forest Vegetation Simulator to explore questions surrounding the management of Mexican spotted owl habitat, specifically how to balance the objective of sustaining and enhancing nest habitat in face of increasing forest fire size and severity in the Southwest. My research consisted of three studies. The first study quantified the structure and composition of the Mexican spotted owl nest stands and scrutinized current evaluation criteria of nest habitat. The second study estimated how much of the Southwestern landscape is at risk to high-severity crown fire and how much of the landscape is suitable Mexican spotted owl nest habitat. The third study modeled forest dynamics and silvicultural intervention in potential Mexican spotted owl nest stands. The purpose of this research is to assist in management of Southwestern forests in order to decrease fire size and severity while sustaining and enhancing current and future Mexican spotted owl nest habitat.
19

Scientists, Uncertainty and Nature, an Analysis of the Development, Implementation and Unintended Consequences of the Northwest Forest Plan

Miller, Gilbert David 28 February 2019 (has links)
The conflict in the Pacific Northwest between competing visions of how federal forests should be managed resulted in a political stalemate in the early 1990s. The Northwest Forest Plan (NWFP) was initiated to resolve the demands for maintaining ecosystem processes and biological diversity with the social and economic needs for timber harvest. The foundation for the plan rested with the development of ecosystem management. The intent of this research is to explore the events which led up to the adoption of the NWFP, how it was implemented by the US Forest Service and Bureau of Land Management and the subsequent reactions to and consequences of the plan. The primary research consisted of thirty-eight semi-structured interviews with individuals responsible for the development of the initial plan, those tasked with implementing the plan and current federal agency personnel from the land management agencies and regulatory agencies. With the use of thematic analysis, key meanings were captured as expressed by the interviewees. The data was analyzed using institutional theory, capturing the organizational relations within the organizational field of the land management agencies. Research findings suggest that the NWFP was unsuccessful in meeting the goal of addressing the social and economic issues as well as the goals for ecosystem management. This dissertation explores the organizational practices and cultural meanings that led to the final instantiation of the plan. It seeks to shed light on the reasons why these goals were not met and how future forest plans can move beyond the current stalemate between conservation and preservation.

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