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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
41

Two essays on institutions, corporate government and firms' information environments: evidence from China. / CUHK electronic theses & dissertations collection

January 2011 (has links)
Although idiosyncratic return volatility has been used in a number of studies to capture the informativeness of stock prices, the relation between the two is still under controversy. Researchers raise more questions about the existence of such a relation in emerging markets since the efficient market hypothesis (EMH) may not sustain in these markets. Therefore, use idiosyncratic return volatility estimated from the common asset pricing models as a measure of stock price informativeness becomes questionable. The first part of this thesis serves to validate the use of idiosyncratic return volatility as a stock price informativeness measure in the China settings. In particular, using a battery of information flow proxies, I empirically test the relation between stock price informativeness and idiosyncratic return volatility; the empirical evidence supports the existence of such a relation. However, there exists an inverse U-shape relation between firm-specific information and idiosyncratic return volatility. Therefore, in the second essay, when using idiosyncratic return volatility as a measure of informativeness of stock prices, I truncate the sample as Morek et al. (2000) do in their study. / From an institutional perspective, my dissertation attempts to explain why firms operating in emerging markets such as China have inferior information environments. The main theme of this thesis is to provide firm-level evidence that the institutional settings in China change firms' incentives to provide firm-specific information to the stock market and thus impair the information environments and lower the idiosyncratic return volatilities of these firms. / Keywords: Institutions; information environments; performance hiding / The second part of this thesis addresses the research question on how firms' information environments are shaped by a country's institutions. Morek et al. (2000) document that more developed countries usually have better information environments, and vice versa. The authors offer an "institutional explanation" that attributes the poor information environments in emerging markets to the lack of property rights protections in these markets. However, previous literature provides only limited evidences on how institutions affect the supply of firm-specific information to the market. Hence, this paper uses China as case to investigate how extensive government interventions in China generate incentives for firms to hide their information. I find that, first, excessive local government in a region increases firms' incentives to hide their true performance, after controlling for firm characteristics. A further analysis shows that the directions of firms' hiding activities vary across firms and are contingent on the nature of the firms' ultimate owners, because of different political pressures exerted. In particular, I find that family firms are more likely to suppress good news to avoid governments' "grabbing hands", while State-owned Enterprises (SOEs) are more likely to hide their bad performances to protect local governments' image from being damaged. Second, firms' hiding activities do impair firms' information environment, resulting in lower idiosyncratic stock return volatilities. To strengthen this argument, I test the "information link" between firms' hiding activities and their information environments. I find that firms' incentives to hide their performances reduce market participants' motives to acquire private information, evident by fewer analyst following. Moreover, my results show that involvement of information intermediaries alleviates the negative effects of firms' hiding activities on the information environments. / pt. 1. Information environments in China: availability of firm-specific information to the capital market -- pt. 2. Government intervention, firms' hiding activities and information environments: evidence from China. / Lin, Jingrong. / Adviser: T. J. Wong. / Source: Dissertation Abstracts International, Volume: 73-04, Section: A, page: . / Thesis (Ph.D.)--Chinese University of Hong Kong, 2011. / Includes bibliographical references. / Electronic reproduction. Hong Kong : Chinese University of Hong Kong, [2012] System requirements: Adobe Acrobat Reader. Available via World Wide Web. / Electronic reproduction. [Ann Arbor, MI] : ProQuest Information and Learning, [201-] System requirements: Adobe Acrobat Reader. Available via World Wide Web. / Abstract also in Chinese.
42

Mispricing of earnings components: empirical evidence from China. / CUHK electronic theses & dissertations collection / Digital dissertation consortium / ProQuest dissertations and theses

January 2003 (has links)
This study investigates whether earnings components are correctly priced by the Chinese investors. Under the Chinese GAAP, total earnings can be easily decomposed into core earnings and non-core earnings. Core earnings are more persistent than non-core earnings and cash flows from operations are more persistent than accruals, as expected. However, the market underestimates (overestimates) the value implications of current core (non-core) earnings for future earnings. Furthermore, the market overprices (underprices) accruals (cash flows from operations). Therefore, future returns adjusted for risk factors identified in this study are predictable by the information contained in the components of current earnings. Both the portfolio tests and regression analysis generate economically significant abnormal returns that are robust to sensitivity checks. Further analysis suggests that there is no significant difference in the extent of mispricing across firms with different characteristics such as transaction costs, arbitrage risks, investor sophistication, or firm size. This could be due to the measurement errors in the proxy variables for these characteristics. / Wu Donghui. / "July 2003." / Advisers: In-Mu Haw; James Xie. / Source: Dissertation Abstracts International, Volume: 64-07, Section: A, page: 2551. / Thesis (Ph.D.)--Chinese University of Hong Kong, 2003. / Includes bibliographical references (p. 121-130). / Available also through the Internet via Current research @ Chinese University of Hong Kong under title: Mispricings of earnings components empirical evidence from China. / Electronic reproduction. Hong Kong : Chinese University of Hong Kong, [2012] System requirements: Adobe Acrobat Reader. Available via World Wide Web. / Electronic reproduction. Ann Arbor, MI : ProQuest dissertations and theses, [200-] System requirements: Adobe Acrobat Reader. Available via World Wide Web. / Electronic reproduction. Ann Arbor, MI : ProQuest Information and Learning Company, [200-] System requirements: Adobe Acrobat Reader. Available via World Wide Web. / Abstracts in English and Chinese. / School code: 1307.
43

Statistical inference in continuous-time models with short-range and/or long-range dependence

Casas Villalba, Isabel January 2006 (has links)
The aim of this thesis is to estimate the volatility function of continuoustime stochastic models. The estimation of the volatility of the following wellknown international stock market indexes is presented as an application: Dow Jones Industrial Average, Standard and Poor’s 500, NIKKEI 225, CAC 40, DAX 30, FTSE 100 and IBEX 35. This estimation is studied from two different perspectives: a) assuming that the volatility of the stock market indexes displays shortrange dependence (SRD), and b) extending the previous model for processes with longrange dependence (LRD), intermediaterange dependence (IRD) or SRD. Under the efficient market hypothesis (EMH), the compatibility of the Vasicek, the CIR, the Anh and Gao, and the CKLS models with the stock market indexes is being tested. Nonparametric techniques are presented to test the affinity of these parametric volatility functions with the volatility observed from the data. Under the assumption of possible statistical patterns in the volatility process, a new estimation procedure based on the Whittle estimation is proposed. This procedure is theoretically and empirically proven. In addition, its application to the stock market indexes provides interesting results.
44

Volatility estimates of ARCH models.

January 2001 (has links)
Chung Kwong-leung. / Thesis (M.Phil.)--Chinese University of Hong Kong, 2001. / Includes bibliographical references (leaves 80-84). / Abstracts in English and Chinese. / ACKNOWOLEDGMENTS --- p.iii / LIST OF TABLES --- p.iv / LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS --- p.vi / CHAPTER / Chapter ONE --- INTORDUCTION --- p.1 / Chapter TWO --- LITERATURE REVIEW --- p.5 / Volatility / ARCH Models / The Accuracy of ARCH Volatility Estimates / Chapter THREE --- METHODOLOGY --- p.11 / Testing and Estimation / Simulation / Chapter FOUR --- DATA DESCRIPTION AND EMPIRICAL RESULTS --- p.29 / Data Description / Testing and Estimation Results / Simulation Results / Chapter FIVE --- CONCLUSION --- p.45 / TABLES --- p.49 / ILLUSTRATIONS --- p.58 / APPENDICES --- p.77 / BIBOGRAPHY --- p.80
45

A study of Hong Kong foreign exchange warrants pricing using black-scholes formula

Lee, Chi-ming, Simon., 李志明. January 1992 (has links)
published_or_final_version / Business Administration / Master / Master of Business Administration
46

Extreme value analysis of Hong Kong's stock market.

January 2000 (has links)
Kam Ying Chuen. / Thesis (M.Phil.)--Chinese University of Hong Kong, 2000. / Includes bibliographical references (leaves 81-83). / Abstracts in English and Chinese. / Chapter 1 --- Introduction --- p.1 / Chapter 2 --- Overview of Hong Kong Stock Market --- p.3 / Chapter 2.1 --- Stock Exchange of Hong Kong --- p.3 / Chapter 2.2 --- Hang Seng Index --- p.4 / Chapter 2.3 --- Influences of the United States --- p.5 / Chapter 2.4 --- Hong Kong Government's Intervention --- p.6 / Chapter 3 --- Literature Review --- p.8 / Chapter 3.1 --- Stable and Student t Distributions --- p.8 / Chapter 3.2 --- Generalized Distribution --- p.10 / Chapter 3.3 --- Socio-economic Model --- p.11 / Chapter 3.4 --- Extreme Value Analysis --- p.11 / Chapter 4 --- Methodology --- p.14 / Chapter 4.1 --- Homogeneous Model --- p.15 / Chapter 4.2 --- Inhomogeneous Model --- p.15 / Chapter 4.3 --- Model Validity --- p.16 / Chapter 4.3.1 --- Exceedance Rate --- p.17 / Chapter 4.3.2 --- Distribution of Excesses --- p.17 / Chapter 4.3.3 --- Independence --- p.18 / Chapter 5 --- Data --- p.19 / Chapter 5.1 --- Minute-by-minute Returns --- p.20 / Chapter 5.2 --- Daily returns --- p.21 / Chapter 5.3 --- Explanatory Variables for the Inhomogeneous Model --- p.21 / Chapter 6 --- Empirical Results: Minute-by-minute Returns --- p.24 / Chapter 6.1 --- Shape Parameter k --- p.24 / Chapter 6.2 --- Location Parameter μ --- p.25 / Chapter 6.3 --- Scale Parameter σ --- p.26 / Chapter 6.4 --- Conditional Scale Parameter ψ --- p.27 / Chapter 6.5 --- Specification Test --- p.29 / Chapter 7 --- Empirical Results: Daily Returns --- p.29 / Chapter 7.1 --- Homogeneous Model --- p.30 / Chapter 7.2 --- Inhomogeneous Model --- p.31 / Chapter 7.2.1 --- Constant Term --- p.32 / Chapter 7.2.2 --- Dow Jones Industrial Average Returns --- p.33 / Chapter 7.2.3 --- Volatility Indicators --- p.34 / Chapter 7.2.4 --- Monday Dummy --- p.35 / Chapter 7.2.5 --- Time Trend --- p.36 / Chapter 7.2.6 --- Duration Dummy --- p.37 / Chapter 7.2.7 --- Indicator for the Behavior of the Previous Trading Day --- p.38 / Chapter 8 --- Conclusion --- p.39
47

Modeling and forecasting Hong Kong stock market return.

January 1999 (has links)
by Wong Hiu Ming. / Thesis (M.Phil.)--Chinese University of Hong Kong, 1999. / Includes bibliographical references (leaves 74-79). / Abstracts in English and Chinese. / ACKNOWLEDGMENTS --- p.iii / LIST OF TABLES --- p.iv / LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS --- p.v / CHAPTER / Chapter ONE --- INTRODUCTION --- p.1 / Chapter TWO --- THE LITERATURE REVIEW --- p.5 / ARCH/GARCH Models / Nonparametric Method / Chapter THREE --- METHODOLOGY --- p.14 / ARCH Modeling / Semiparametric GARCH Modeling / Causality Test / Local Polynomial Model / Chapter FOUR --- DATA AND EMPIRICAL RESULTS --- p.37 / Data / GARCH Modeling / Semiparametric GARCH Modeling / Causality Test / Local Polynomial Model / Chapter FIVE --- CONCLUSION --- p.52 / TABLES --- p.56 / ILLUSTRATIONS --- p.62 / APPENDIX --- p.71 / BIBLIOGRAPHY --- p.74
48

Exchange rate variability and the riskiness of US multinational firms: evidence from the Asian turnmoil.

January 2001 (has links)
Chen Chen. / Thesis (M.Phil.)--Chinese University of Hong Kong, 2001. / Includes bibliographical references (leaves 122-129). / Abstracts in English and Chinese. / ABSTRACT --- p.ii / ACKNOWLEDGEMENT --- p.iv / TABLE OF CONTENTS --- p.v / LIST OF FIGURES --- p.vii / LIST OF TABLES --- p.viii / Chapter / Chapter I. --- INTRODUCTION --- p.1 / Chapter 1.1 --- Introduction --- p.1 / Chapter 1.2 --- Objectives and Motivation --- p.5 / Chapter 1.3 --- The Asian Crisis --- p.9 / Chapter 1.4 --- Procedures and Findings --- p.18 / Chapter 1.5 --- Summary --- p.20 / Chapter II. --- LITERATURE REVIEW --- p.21 / Chapter 2.1 --- Definition and Determinants --- p.21 / Chapter 2.2 --- Measurement Model --- p.25 / Chapter 2.3 --- Exchange Rate Fluctuation and Market Value of the Firm --- p.28 / Chapter 2.3.1 --- Exchange Rate Fluctuation and Stock Return --- p.28 / Chapter 2.3.2 --- Some Problems of the Measurement Model --- p.31 / Chapter 2.4 --- Exchange Rate Fluctuation and Market Risk of the Firm --- p.42 / Chapter 2.5 --- Summary --- p.45 / Chapter III. --- HYPOTHESES,METHODOLOGY & DATA --- p.47 / Chapter 3.1 --- Hypotheses --- p.47 / Chapter 3.2 --- Research Design --- p.50 / Chapter 3.3 --- Sample Selection --- p.56 / Chapter 3.3.1 --- Selection of Sample Group --- p.56 / Chapter 3.3.2 --- Selection of Control Group --- p.61 / Chapter 3.3.3 --- Comparison of Two Groups --- p.62 / Chapter 3.4 --- Data and the Measurement of the Variables --- p.64 / Chapter 3.5 --- Summary --- p.67 / Chapter IV. --- EMPIRICAL RESULTS AND DISCUSSION --- p.68 / Chapter 4.1 --- Exchange Rate Variability and Stock Return Volatility --- p.68 / Chapter 4.2 --- Exchange Rate Variability and Market Risk --- p.81 / Chapter 4.3 --- Interpretations --- p.87 / Chapter 4.3.1 --- Phenomenon 1: Cost of Equity and Net Cash Flows --- p.89 / Chapter 4.3.2 --- Phenomenon 2: Increased Return Variability and the US Stock Market Return --- p.92 / Chapter 4.4 --- Alternative Explanation --- p.96 / Chapter 4.5 --- Summary --- p.99 / Chapter V. --- CONCLUDING REMARKS --- p.100 / APPENDICES / APPENDIX 1. Firm Lists --- p.105 / APPENDIX 2. Estimates of CAPM Betas --- p.115 / BIBLIOGRAPHY --- p.122

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