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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
1

Studies of North American Plecoptera (Pteronarcinae and Perlodini) ...

Smith, Lucy Wright. January 1900 (has links)
Thesis (Ph. D.)--Cornell University, 1914. / [Repr. from Trans. Am. Ent. Soc. Vol. 43, 1917].
2

A detailed study of the external morphology of a species of Leuctra ; and, A taxonomic study of certain of the New England stoneflies.

Hanson, John Francis 01 January 1938 (has links) (PDF)
No description available.
3

Phylogeny of the polyneopterous insects with emphasis on Plecoptera : molecular and morpological evidence /

Terry, Matthew D. January 2003 (has links) (PDF)
Thesis (Ph. D.)--Brigham Young University. Dept. of Integrative Biology, 2003. / Includes bibliographical references.
4

The Stoneflies (Plecoptera) of the Ozark and Ouachita Mountains

Poulton, Barry C. (Barry Charles) 12 1900 (has links)
Collections of stoneflies (Plecoptera) were made at 603 stream sites from Nov. 1983 - May 1988 in the Ozark-Ouachita Mountain region, in relation to physiographic and vegetational characteristics. Examination of approximately 9000 vials from these collections, supplemented with material from major museums and other collectors, revealed 88 stonefly species in 8 families and 24 genera. Pearson's measure of association (R) showed there was a significant association between species present and each of the tested variables.
5

Emergence patterns of Plecoptera (stoneflies) from Otter Creek, Wisconsin

Narf, Richard P. January 1972 (has links)
Thesis (M.S.)--University of Wisconsin, 1972. / Typescript. eContent provider-neutral record in process. Description based on print version record. Includes bibliographical references (leaves 60-62).
6

Comparative Feeding Ecology of Leaf Pack-Inhabiting Systellognathan Stoneflies (Plecoptera) in the Upper Little Missouri River, Arkansas

Feminella, Jack W. (Jack William) 08 1900 (has links)
The feeding ecologies of leaf pack-associated systellognathan stoneflies were examined from 6 June 1980 21 May 1981. Species composition, seasonal abundance, nymphal growth, feeding habits and mouthpart morphology were determined for the eight dominant stonefly species. Prey preferences and predator-prey size relationships were also examined for omnivorous and carnivorous species. Foregut analysis from 2860 individuals indicated opportunistic feeding on the most abundant prey insects, usually in proportion to prey frequency. Feeding preference studies generally indicated random feeding on major prey groups. Prey and predator sizes were usually highly correlated (p<0.01), with predators expanding their prey size thresholds with growth. The potential for competition between sympatric stoneflies for prey is discussed.
7

The ephemeroptera, plecoptera, and trichoptera of Missouri state parks with notes on biomonitoring, mesohabitat associations, and distribution

Ferro, Michael Leslie. January 2005 (has links)
Thesis (M.S.) University of Missouri-Columbia, 2005. / The entire dissertation/thesis text is included in the research.pdf file; the official abstract appears in the short.pdf file (which also appears in the research.pdf); a non-technical general description, or public abstract, appears in the public.pdf file. Title from title screen of research.pdf file viewed on (July 10, 2006) Includes bibliographical references.
8

The laboratory rearing of stoneflies.

Shepardson, David Emery 01 January 1968 (has links) (PDF)
No description available.
9

Ecology and energetics of an aquatic detritivore, Pteronarcys proteus (Plecoptera: Pteronarcyidae)

Perry, William B. January 1985 (has links)
Life history, food habits, energetics, and production by nymphs of Pteronarcys proteus were measured. The life cycle lasted four years in an Appalachian mountain stream in southwestern Virginia. Adults emerged late May to early June, and eggs deposited did not hatch until the following spring. Nymphs grew at least 3 years with 12 male instars and 13 female instars. The nymphal diet was primarily leaf detritus, with a small percentage of moss and animal matter. Total crude lipid content of nymphs varied from 6% to 29% of dry insect weight and was dependent on age, season, and developmental state. Lipid content of nymphs in the two youngest cohorts generally declined during late summer, but increased after leaf-fall in November. A similar pattern was observed in the oldest cohort, but a significant decline in the spring prior to emergence of adults was also observed. The data indicate that P. proteus relied on lipid stores during periods of low food availability and for reproductive maturation. The energetic parameters of growth (G), respiration (R), ingestion (I), and egestion (E) for nymphs in each of the three cohorts were measured in the laboratory. Growth rates ranged from 0.031 to 0.0037 mg/mg/day, with small nymphs growing fastest. Ingestion ranged from 5 to 40% of dry body weight per day. Respiration ranged from 330 to 980 µl O₂/g/hr. Mean AD was 13.5%, mean gross growth efficiency was 5.2%, and mean net growth efficiency was 38.7%. Total assimilation by a population was estimated at 119 kcal m⁻², accounted for primarily by the two oldest cohorts. Annual energetics of the nymphal population were: I= 906, G= 41, R= 78, and E= 828 kcal m⁻². Annual production was 0.438 g m⁻², 3.158 g m⁻², and 4.182 g m⁻², with the youngest cohort contributing the smallest. Mean cohort densities ranged from 23.8 to 9.3 nymphs m⁻², and mean standing stock biomass ranged from 0.143 to 1.790 gm⁻². Mean relative growth rates (RGR) in the stream were greatest for smallest nymphs and ranged from 0.939 to 0.182 percent increase per day. The data indicate that growth rates of small nymphs were influenced by temperature and larger nymphs by food supply. It was estimated that P. proteus consumed 41-61% of the litterfall in the study stream. / Ph. D.
10

Drumming Behavior of Selected North American Stoneflies (Plecoptera)

Maketon, Monchan 12 1900 (has links)
Drumming is first described for five North American stonefly species, Acroneuria evoluta, Doroneuria baumanni, Isoperla namata, Chernokrilus misnomus, and Pictetiella expansa. Signals of Acroneuria lycorias, Phasganophora capitata and Isoperla signata are further described. Drumming was not recorded from Amhinemura delosa. Signals of A. evoluta are the most complex yet recorded in Plecoptera. Doroneuria baumanni, P. expanse, C. misnomus and P. capitata have 2-way exchanges. Male D. baumanni produce two prolonged beats by rubbing the hammer on the substratum; male-female signals are non-overlapping in the first two species and overlapping in the latter two. Female P. capitata answered with an unusually long sequence of beats. Two male Isoperla species produced monophasic calls without female answers. Female A. lycorias answered taped male signals with monophasic signals like all observed females.

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