• Refine Query
  • Source
  • Publication year
  • to
  • Language
  • 1
  • Tagged with
  • 1
  • 1
  • 1
  • 1
  • 1
  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
1

ELECTROCHEMICAL AND SPECTROSCOPIC STUDIES OF THIOETHER COORDINATION COMPLEXES (CYCLIC VOLTAMMETRY, OCTAHEDRAL LOW-SPIN METALS, BLUE COPPER PROTEINS, ELECTRON PARAMAGNETIC RESONANCE).

SWANSON, DALE DORSETT. January 1985 (has links)
The bis 1,4,7-trithiacyclononane (1,4,7-TTCN) complexes of iron, cobalt, nickel and copper are reported in this work. Their properties have been examined using computer-controlled electrochemical and spectroscopic techniques. These TTCN complexes form readily, are unusually symmetrical and support electron transfer reactions at the metal center. The cobalt(II) complex is octahedral, low spin and symmetrical. Four oxidation states of cobalt-TTCN complex are observed; two one-electron transfer processes are reversible. Copper (II) bis 1,4,7-TTCN is unusually symmetrical evidenced by both solid phase and ambient temperature aqueous phase electron paramagnetic resonance spectra. An unusually high redox potential for the copper complex indicates extraordinary stability of the Cu(I) oxidation state but evidently not at the expense of Cu(II) stability. The complex also has a high formation constant compared to other copper-thioether complexes. This unusual strength of thioether donor is attributed to ligand geometry. The 1,4,7-TTCN molecule is the only known cyclic polythioether to have all sulfur atoms endodentate. This structure contributes to thermodynamic stability of complexes as the ground state configuration of the free ligand is maintained in the complex.

Page generated in 0.0526 seconds