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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
1

1 Corinthians 9 and the athletic terminology of Paul

Caplet, Keith D. January 1981 (has links)
Thesis (M.A.)--Western Conservative Baptist Seminary, 1981. / Includes bibliographical references (46-50).
2

1 Corinthians 9 and the athletic terminology of Paul

Caplet, Keith D. January 1981 (has links) (PDF)
Thesis (M.A.)--Western Conservative Baptist Seminary, 1981. / Includes bibliographical references (46-50).
3

A reading of the imagery of Lamentations /

Mitchell, Mary Louise January 2004 (has links)
This dissertation interprets the poems of the book of Lamentations through the study of their imagery and of the themes expressed through that imagery. The introduction places the study in the context of literary studies of biblical texts and of recent scholarship on Lamentations. The book is read in its canonical order, identifying the images and patterns of imagery which occur in each poem. Major images are compared with similar images in other biblical poetry and interpreted as to the themes which they express. Comparison of imagery which appears in several poems illustrates how the experience of the fall of Jerusalem is variously understood and expressed within the book as a whole. The poems depict the suffering and losses of the community during the siege and its aftermath, while attempting to understand what these events mean for the community's relationship with its god. The speaker of Lam 3, however, reflects on human suffering from the perspective of an individual man. The poems and the book as a whole express vividly the experience of loss and suffering. The religious meaning of the disaster remains unanswered throughout the book, with the possible exception of the first chapter, where the balance of imagery of sin and suffering suggests that the sufferers receive what they have deserved for their sins. The book as a whole both expresses loss and suffering and inquires without final resolution as to the religious meaning of the communal disaster.
4

The implications of marriage imagery for theology with reference to selected Old Testament prophets and the Pauline corpus

Niedfeldt, Scott January 2004 (has links) (PDF)
Thesis (M.A.)--Trinity International University, 2004. / Abstract. Includes bibliographical references (leaves 76-80).
5

The implications of marriage imagery for theology with reference to selected Old Testament prophets and the Pauline corpus

Niedfeldt, Scott January 2004 (has links)
Thesis (M.A.)--Trinity International University, 2004. / Abstract. Includes bibliographical references (leaves 76-80).
6

The tree of life motif in Proverbs

Beck, James A. January 1986 (has links)
Thesis (M. Div.)--Grace Theological Seminary, 1986. / Abstract. Includes bibliographical references (leaves 53-57).
7

A reading of the imagery of Lamentations /

Mitchell, Mary Louise January 2004 (has links)
No description available.
8

Symbolism of water in John.

09 January 2008 (has links)
He spoke and galaxies whirled into place, stars burned the heavens, and planets began orbiting their suns – words of awesome, unlimited, unleashed power. He spoke again and the waters and lands were filled with plants and creatures, running, swimming, growing, and multiplying – words of animating, breathing, pulsing life. Again He spoke and man and woman were formed, thinking, speaking, and loving – words of personal and creative glory. Eternal, infinite, unlimited – He was, is, and always will be the Maker and Lord of all that exists. And then He came in the flesh to a speck in the universe called planet earth. The mighty Creator became a part of the creation, limited by time and space and susceptible to age, sickness, and death. But love propelled Him, and so He came to rescue and save those who were lost and to give them the gift of eternity. He is the Word (John 1:1); He is the Bread of Life (6:35); He is the Way, the Truth, and the Life (14:6); He is the Giver of Living Water (4:13-14); He is Jesus, the Christ. Without light, water, and food there could be no life. It is exactly these elements that John uses as symbols in his Gospel to present Jesus as the Light, Water and Food to the reader. Each of these symbols is a vital part of the context of eternal life though for this study the focus will be on water, and its symbolism in the book of John. We will firstly consider the meaning of Johannine symbolism, Following, the significance of the water motif in the Old and New Testament, the characteristics of John’s use of the Old Testament and the Johannine writings. We will end our study with the eschatology and the symbolic meaning of water in John 4. / Prof. J.A. du Rand
9

"Who has heard of such a thing?" feminine Zion in Isaiah 40-66 /

Driedger, Kevin S. January 1996 (has links)
Thesis (M.A. in Theological Studies)--Associated Mennonite Biblical Seminary, 1996. / Includes bibliographical references (leaves 94-100).
10

"You have come to Zion" the use of the Old Testament Zion tradition in the New Testament /

Headen, Jerry Wayne, January 1995 (has links)
Thesis (M. Div.)--Emmanuel School of Religion, 1995. / Vita. Includes bibliographical references (leaves 69-76).

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