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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
1

CoRE - komponentenorientierte Entwicklung offener verteilter Softwaresysteme im Telekommunikationskontext

Born, Marc. January 2002 (has links) (PDF)
Berlin, Humboldt-Universiẗat, Diss., 2002.
2

Contributions to delay, gain, and offset estimation /

Olsson, Mattias, January 2008 (has links)
Diss. Linköping : Linköpings universitet, 2008.
3

Overlay multicast networks : elements, architectures and performance /

Constantinescu, Doru, January 2007 (has links)
Diss. Karlskrona : Blekinge tekniska högskola, 2007.
4

Contributions to frequency offset and time delay estimation /

Olsson, Mattias, January 2006 (has links)
Licentiatavhandling Linköping : Linköpings universitet, 2006.
5

DSP algorithms and architectures for telecommunication /

Karlsson Rudberg, Mikael, January 1900 (has links) (PDF)
Diss. Linköping : Univ., 2001.
6

Ring network design in telecommunications : optimization based solution approaches /

Henningsson, Mathias, January 2003 (has links) (PDF)
Diss. (sammanfattning) Linköping : Univ., 2003. / Härtill 6 uppsatser.
7

IP telephony : Mobility and security

Vatn, Jon-Olov January 2005 (has links)
With the introduction of IP based telephony services, the Internet has started to challenge the traditional PSTN networks as an infrastructure for providing real-time interactive services. This upcoming paradigm shift is not only driven by the desire to provide cost efficient solutions, but by basing the communication on IP we expect that the end-users will experience a greater set of attractive services over a single connection compared to what is provided by a PSTN today. Looking a little further ahead, mobile communication systems will also become IP based. Companies, universities and private persons have started to extend their local area networks to provide wireless access by attaching wireless access points (APs) to their LAN. Wireless ISPs (WISPs) are putting up wireless LAN (WLAN) APs at public hot spots, thereby providing a complement or even a competitive alternative to the wireless WANs (WWANs) being developed and deployed today. As more and more people start to communicate using WLAN access, they will naturally wish to use this infrastructure for interactive real-time applications, such as mobile telephony. This thesis concerns mobility and security support for IP telephony in public WLAN environments. The security issues addressed relate both to user requirements such as end-to-end confidentiality, and operator requirements such as network access control. Alternatives for how the voice media stream can be protected and the procedure to establish a secure call using SIP are described. Public WLAN architectures enabling service providers to share access network infrastructure are described and evaluated. To enforce access control the use of either IEEE 802.11i or L2TP/IPSec is suggested, since both meet the proposed security requirements, and both are standardized solutions available on modern systems. The case where mobile users perform handovers between APs on the same LAN (layer-2 handover) and across IP subnets (layer-3) is studied. For layer-2 handovers the properties of IEEE 802.11b handover mechanisms and its impact on voice traffic, and the effect of the network access control mechanism on the handover performance are examined. The mechanisms necessary to perform layer-3 handovers and their impact on handover performance are described. The analysis focus on “SIP mobility” and Mobile IPv6, since these mobility management schemes provide optimal routing, thus are well suited for IP telephony
8

Quality of service differentiation, teletraffic analysis and network layer packet redundancy in optical packet switched networks

Øverby, Harald January 2005 (has links)
Optical Packet Switching (OPS) has emerged as a promising candidate for the next-generation Wavelength Division Multiplexed (WDM) based alloptical network. By enabling packet switching in the optical domain, OPS networks can provide cost-efficient and transparent transport services to higher layers. However, a commercial deployment of OPS requires not only a maturation of several key enabling technologies, but also a thorough investigation of a number of networking challenges related to OPS, since OPS networks are fundamentally different from today’s store-and-forward networks. This thesis addresses the latter issue by considering the following three OPS networking issues: · Quality of Service (QoS) differentiation at the WDM layer, with focus on packet loss rate (PLR) and delay-jitter differentiation. · Teletraffic analysis of OPS networks. · How to combat packet loss in OPS networks by using network layer packet redundancy. First, a crucial issue in OPS networks is packet loss at the network layer due to contention. Contention occurs when a packet is destined for a wavelength currently occupied by another packet. Several approaches to combat such packet loss have been proposed in recent literature, e.g. by utilizing wavelength conversion, buffering, deflection routing or traffic shaping. This thesis considers a novel approach to combat packet loss in OPS: The proposed Network Layer Packet Redundancy Scheme (NLPRS) allows redundancy packets to be injected into the OPS network, thus enabling reconstruction of lost data packets at the OPS egress node. Results show that the NLPRS is able to reduce the end-to-end data PLR several orders of magnitude in an asynchronous OPS ring network with and without wavelength conversion. Another crucial issue in OPS networks is QoS differentiation at the WDM layer. Due to the lack of optical random access memory, existing QoS differentiation schemes suitable for today’s WDM point-to-point architecture are not feasible to use in OPS networks. Hence, new schemes that utilize the WDM layer to provide QoS differentiation are needed. A preemption based QoS differentiation scheme, the Preemptive Drop Policy (PDP), has been proposed for asynchronous bufferless OPS. With the PDP, high priority arrivals are allowed to preempt and take over a busy wavelength currently occupied by a low priority packet in the case of contention. This results in a lower PLR for high priority traffic compared to low priority traffic. The PDP has been extended into the Adaptive PDP (APDP), which provides absolute guarantees to the PLR for high priority ivtraffic in OPS by using a measurement based preemption probability parameter adjustment. An access-restriction based QoS differentiation scheme, the Wavelength Allocation algorithm (WA), has been studied. In the WA, which provides QoS differentiation in asynchronous bufferless OPS networks with full range output wavelength converters, a certain number of wavelengths at an output fibre are exclusively reserved for high priority traffic. When QoS differentiation (with respect to the PLR) is introduced in asynchronous OPS, it has been shown that the average throughput decreases, often referred to as the throughput penalty of introducing QoS differentiation. The main cause for this throughput penalty is because network resources must be used in a non-optimal manner when employing QoS differentiation schemes that utilize the WDM layer to isolate the service classes. However, as shown in this thesis, the throughput penalty is only found in asynchronous OPS. For slotted OPS, the average throughput stays the same after the introduction of QoS differentiation. An evaluation framework suitable for quantifying the throughput penalty when introducing QoS differentiation has been proposed. Using this framework, three fundamental different QoS differentiation schemes for asynchronous OPS, including the PDP and the WA, have been evaluated. It has been shown that preemptive techniques result in the lowest throughput penalty, followed by access-restriction and dropping based techniques. This is because, when using preemption, packets are dropped only when the output port is congested. With access-restriction, packets are dropped when the output port is highly strained, and with statistically packet dropping, packets are dropped independently of the state of the output port. A QoS differentiation scheme for slotted OPS has been proposed and evaluated. The scheme isolates the service classes by ensuring that a certain number of high priority packets can be transmitted at an output port in a time-slot in the case of contention. Using the proposed scheme does not result in a reduced throughput when the service classes are isolated. QoS differentiation schemes for asynchronous OPS with a share pernode (SPN) contention resolution pool architecture consisting of Tunable Wavelength Converters (TWCs) and Fibre Delay Lines (FDLs) have been proposed. In particular, it has been shown that the PLR and delay-jitter may be independently differentiated in this switch architecture. Analytical models of some of the proposed QoS differentiation schemes have been derived, providing explicit results of the PLR. In addition, an analytical framework regarding packet arrivals to an output port in an optical packet switch has been derived for both asynchronous and slotted OPS. This framework is particularly useful for studying the effects of nonuniform traffic. Furthermore, it has been shown that both the Erlang and Engset traffic models are suitable to model packet arrivals to an output port in an asynchronous optical packet switch. Regarding the Engset traffic model, it has been shown how the blocking probability can be evaluated vusing either the Engset lost calls cleared (LCC) traffic model or the Engset overflow (OFL) traffic model. For all Engset based traffic models, the time-, call- and traffic congestion have been derived. A numerical evaluation of the presented traffic models reveals that there is a small, but non-negligible, deviation between the observed blocking probabilities, which depends on the number of input/output fibres and the system load.
9

Quality of service differentiation, teletraffic analysis and network layer packet redundancy in optical packet switched networks

Øverby, Harald January 2005 (has links)
<p>Optical Packet Switching (OPS) has emerged as a promising candidate for the next-generation Wavelength Division Multiplexed (WDM) based alloptical network. By enabling packet switching in the optical domain, OPS networks can provide cost-efficient and transparent transport services to higher layers. However, a commercial deployment of OPS requires not only a maturation of several key enabling technologies, but also a thorough investigation of a number of networking challenges related to OPS, since OPS networks are fundamentally different from today’s store-and-forward networks. This thesis addresses the latter issue by considering the following three OPS networking issues:</p><p>· Quality of Service (QoS) differentiation at the WDM layer, with focus on packet loss rate (PLR) and delay-jitter differentiation.</p><p>· Teletraffic analysis of OPS networks.</p><p>· How to combat packet loss in OPS networks by using network layer packet redundancy.</p><p>First, a crucial issue in OPS networks is packet loss at the network layer due to contention. Contention occurs when a packet is destined for a wavelength currently occupied by another packet. Several approaches to combat such packet loss have been proposed in recent literature, e.g. by utilizing wavelength conversion, buffering, deflection routing or traffic shaping.</p><p>This thesis considers a novel approach to combat packet loss in OPS: The proposed Network Layer Packet Redundancy Scheme (NLPRS) allows redundancy packets to be injected into the OPS network, thus enabling reconstruction of lost data packets at the OPS egress node. Results show that the NLPRS is able to reduce the end-to-end data PLR several orders of magnitude in an asynchronous OPS ring network with and without wavelength conversion.</p><p>Another crucial issue in OPS networks is QoS differentiation at the WDM layer. Due to the lack of optical random access memory, existing QoS differentiation schemes suitable for today’s WDM point-to-point architecture are not feasible to use in OPS networks. Hence, new schemes that utilize the WDM layer to provide QoS differentiation are needed.</p><p>A preemption based QoS differentiation scheme, the Preemptive Drop Policy (PDP), has been proposed for asynchronous bufferless OPS. With the PDP, high priority arrivals are allowed to preempt and take over a busy wavelength currently occupied by a low priority packet in the case of contention. This results in a lower PLR for high priority traffic compared to low priority traffic. The PDP has been extended into the Adaptive PDP (APDP), which provides absolute guarantees to the PLR for high priority ivtraffic in OPS by using a measurement based preemption probability parameter adjustment.</p><p>An access-restriction based QoS differentiation scheme, the Wavelength Allocation algorithm (WA), has been studied. In the WA, which provides QoS differentiation in asynchronous bufferless OPS networks with full range output wavelength converters, a certain number of wavelengths at an output fibre are exclusively reserved for high priority traffic.</p><p>When QoS differentiation (with respect to the PLR) is introduced in asynchronous OPS, it has been shown that the average throughput decreases, often referred to as the throughput penalty of introducing QoS differentiation. The main cause for this throughput penalty is because network resources must be used in a non-optimal manner when employing QoS differentiation schemes that utilize the WDM layer to isolate the service classes. However, as shown in this thesis, the throughput penalty is only found in asynchronous OPS. For slotted OPS, the average throughput stays the same after the introduction of QoS differentiation.</p><p>An evaluation framework suitable for quantifying the throughput penalty when introducing QoS differentiation has been proposed. Using this framework, three fundamental different QoS differentiation schemes for asynchronous OPS, including the PDP and the WA, have been evaluated. It has been shown that preemptive techniques result in the lowest throughput penalty, followed by access-restriction and dropping based techniques. This is because, when using preemption, packets are dropped only when the output port is congested. With access-restriction, packets are dropped when the output port is highly strained, and with statistically packet dropping, packets are dropped independently of the state of the output port.</p><p>A QoS differentiation scheme for slotted OPS has been proposed and evaluated. The scheme isolates the service classes by ensuring that a certain number of high priority packets can be transmitted at an output port in a time-slot in the case of contention. Using the proposed scheme does not result in a reduced throughput when the service classes are isolated.</p><p>QoS differentiation schemes for asynchronous OPS with a share pernode (SPN) contention resolution pool architecture consisting of Tunable Wavelength Converters (TWCs) and Fibre Delay Lines (FDLs) have been proposed. In particular, it has been shown that the PLR and delay-jitter may be independently differentiated in this switch architecture.</p><p>Analytical models of some of the proposed QoS differentiation schemes have been derived, providing explicit results of the PLR. In addition, an analytical framework regarding packet arrivals to an output port in an optical packet switch has been derived for both asynchronous and slotted OPS. This framework is particularly useful for studying the effects of nonuniform traffic. Furthermore, it has been shown that both the Erlang and Engset traffic models are suitable to model packet arrivals to an output port in an asynchronous optical packet switch. Regarding the Engset traffic model, it has been shown how the blocking probability can be evaluated vusing either the Engset lost calls cleared (LCC) traffic model or the Engset overflow (OFL) traffic model. For all Engset based traffic models, the time-, call- and traffic congestion have been derived. A numerical evaluation of the presented traffic models reveals that there is a small, but non-negligible, deviation between the observed blocking probabilities, which depends on the number of input/output fibres and the system load.</p>
10

IP telephony : Mobility and security

Vatn, Jon-Olov January 2005 (has links)
<p>With the introduction of IP based telephony services, the Internet has started to challenge the traditional PSTN networks as an infrastructure for providing real-time interactive services. This upcoming paradigm shift is not only driven by the desire to provide cost efficient solutions, but by basing the communication on IP we expect that the end-users will experience a greater set of attractive services over a single connection compared to what is provided by a PSTN today. Looking a little further ahead, mobile communication systems will also become IP based. Companies, universities and private persons have started to extend their local area networks to provide wireless access by attaching wireless access points (APs) to their LAN. Wireless ISPs (WISPs) are putting up wireless LAN (WLAN) APs at public hot spots, thereby providing a complement or even a competitive alternative to the wireless WANs (WWANs) being developed and deployed today. As more and more people start to communicate using WLAN access, they will naturally wish to use this infrastructure for interactive real-time applications, such as mobile telephony.</p><p>This thesis concerns mobility and security support for IP telephony in public WLAN environments. The security issues addressed relate both to user requirements such as end-to-end confidentiality, and operator requirements such as network access control. Alternatives for how the voice media stream can be protected and the procedure to establish a secure call using SIP are described. Public WLAN architectures enabling service providers to share access network infrastructure are described and evaluated. To enforce access control the use of either IEEE 802.11i or L2TP/IPSec is suggested, since both meet the proposed security requirements, and both are standardized solutions available on modern systems.</p><p>The case where mobile users perform handovers between APs on the same LAN (layer-2 handover) and across IP subnets (layer-3) is studied. For layer-2 handovers the properties of IEEE 802.11b handover mechanisms and its impact on voice traffic, and the effect of the network access control mechanism on the handover performance are examined. The mechanisms necessary to perform layer-3 handovers and their impact on handover performance are described. The analysis focus on “SIP mobility” and Mobile IPv6, since these mobility management schemes provide optimal routing, thus are well suited for IP telephony</p>

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