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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
1

French speaker's skill with grammatical gender : an example of rule-governed behavior

Tucker, G. Richard. January 1967 (has links)
No description available.
2

Conjunctive and disjunctive thinking in children.

Snow, Catherine E. January 1967 (has links)
No description available.
3

Do local and international school students in Hong Kong have different thinking styles?

Ngan, Man-fong, Ophelia, 顏文芳 January 2013 (has links)
This study had two objectives. The first objective was to investigate whether or not local and international school students in Hong Kong have different thinking styles. The second objective was to examine the predictive power of socialization variables for thinking styles among students in secondary schools. Three hundred and two students from three schools in Hong Kong responded to the Thinking Styles Inventory – Revised II based on Sternberg’s theory of mental style government, and a survey on two groups of socialization variables: student characteristic and school environment. The student characteristic variables included personological and situational variables, while the school environmental variables included in-class experience and assessment-related variables. Results indicated that there were statistically significant differences in thinking styles between local and international school students in Hong Kong. Results also indicated that the subgroup of in-class experience was the most powerful in predicting thinking styles at the international school, the subgroup of assessment-related variables was the most powerful in predicting thinking styles at the traditional local school, and the subgroup of personological characteristics was the most powerful in predicting thinking styles at the direct subsidy scheme local school. Implications of the findings are discussed for parents, teachers, school administrators and policy makers. / published_or_final_version / Education / Master / Master of Education
4

An experimental study of silent thinking

Clark, Ruth Swan, January 1922 (has links)
Published also as Thesis (Ph. D.)--Columbia University, 1922. / "Columbia university contributions to philosophy and psychology." "Bibliography of references": p. 100-101.
5

Renewing the mind the key to transformed living (Romans 12:2A) /

Boerner, Bob. January 1984 (has links)
Thesis (M. Div.)--International School of Theology, 1984. / Abstract. Includes bibliographical references (leaves 31-32).
6

An experimental study of thinking with normal subjects

Fey, Florence Elizabeth, January 1955 (has links)
Thesis (Ph. D.)--University of Wisconsin--Madison, 1955. / Typescript. Vita. eContent provider-neutral record in process. Description based on print version record. Includes bibliographical references.
7

The role of labelling in concept formation

Levin, Alan David. January 1960 (has links)
Thesis (M.A.)--University of Wisconsin--Madison, 1960. / Typescript. eContent provider-neutral record in process. Description based on print version record. Includes bibliographical references (leaf 24).
8

Renewing the mind the key to transformed living (Romans 12:2A) /

Boerner, Bob. January 1984 (has links) (PDF)
Thesis (M. Div.)--International School of Theology, 1984. / Abstract. Includes bibliographical references (leaves 31-32).
9

Renewing the mind the key to transformed living (Romans 12:2A) /

Boerner, Bob. January 1984 (has links)
Thesis (M. Div.)--International School of Theology, 1984. / Abstract. Includes bibliographical references (leaves 31-32).
10

EXPLANATION AND MENTAL ENTITIES.

WOOD, GEORGE DARLINGTON. January 1982 (has links)
This dissertation centers on issues central to a scientific account of mental entities. In part I, I first consider the general question of whether, and when, it is legitimate to postulate theoretical entities in science. I argue that interpreting theories as if their theoretical terms do not refer to real items lowers their explanatory value by eliminating the opportunity to provide connections with other theories and provide a cohesive account of the world. I then question whether psychological theory needs to postulate mental entities in order to provide adequate explanations of observable behavior, concluding that, behaviorist claims not withstanding, talk about the mental cannot be reduced to talk about behavior. Finally, I argue that it is incumbent on such a theory to investigate the operation and constitution of its entities. In part II, I address attacks on the view that mental items might be made of physical stuff, but not analyzable in purely physical terms. I argue that while revised dualist arguments can show that mental entities cannot be defined in the vocabulary of physics, this is nevertheless consistent with their having a physical constitution. I conclude that in addressing the issue of mind-body identity, the solution lies as much in understanding "identity" as in understanding "mind." In part III, I apply the scientific account of mental items developed in the preceding parts to two traditional philosophical issues; the problem of personal identity. I sketch solutions to these problems and conclude that many remaining problems require scientific investigations rather than philosophical analysis.

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