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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
21

none

Lee, Ru-hong 01 July 2008 (has links)
The aim of this study is to understand students¡¦ solutions (to problems related to time, time interval, and time unit conversion) and to analyze their common errors and possible causes. Students¡¦ problem-solving strategies and error types were also categorized and used as a reference for improvement in teaching and a scaffold for supporting students' learning. Findings in this research were three: 1. Distinction between time and interval. Students were performing better in the concept of interval than in the concept of time. They also performed well in total time consumed and in daily life problems such as clock time. However, problems with longer text description would make it harder for students to do problem solving in the concept of time and interval. 2. Problem-solving types. The problem-solving types ranked by the frequency are: (1) processing larger units first; (2) converting time from high scale to low scale and vice-versa; (3) using fractions; (4) using decimals; and (5) using addition. 3. Error types: The error types presented by students in solving time-related problems include: (1) interference of the decimal; (2) interference between non-decimal time conversion systems; (3) insufficient knowledge about division; (4) unclear concept about high and low scales of time; (5) incorrect calculation; (6) influence of the clock dial structure; (7) incorrect problem-solving strategy; (8) misjudgment of keywords; and (9) ignorance of problem conditions.
22

Making meaning from a clock : material artifacts and conceptual blending in time-telling instruction /

Williams, Robert Frederick. January 2004 (has links)
Thesis (Ph. D.)--University of California, San Diego, 2004. / Vita. Includes bibliographical references (leaves 334-339).
23

The use of time by twenty-five Kansas homemakers

Goodyear, Margaret Rose January 2011 (has links)
Typescript, etc. / Digitized by Kansas State University Libraries
24

Energy integration and preparatory set effects in intersensory facilitation

Pound, Larry Dean January 2010 (has links)
Digitized by Kansas Correctional Industries
25

A comparative analysis between the premotor reaction time of women athletes and women non-athletes

Mosely, Kenneth Don January 2010 (has links)
Digitized by Kansas Correctional Industries
26

Offset to onset or onset to onset?: a study of duration memory content in pre-attentive interval timing. / Duration memory content

January 2005 (has links)
Tse Chun Yu. / Thesis (M.Phil.)--Chinese University of Hong Kong, 2005. / Includes bibliographical references (leaves 84-91). / Abstract in English and Chinese. / Title Page --- p.i / Abstract (English) --- p.ii / Abstract (Chinese) --- p.iii / Acknowledgments --- p.iv / Table of Contents --- p.v / Chapter CHAPTER 1 --- Introduction --- p.1 / Scalar Expectancy Theory --- p.1 / Figure 1. --- p.2 / Filled and Empty Intervals --- p.3 / Superiority of Filled Intervals --- p.3 / Superiority of Empty Intervals --- p.8 / Adaptive Procedure and Inferiority of Empty Interval --- p.9 / Internal-Marker Hypothesis --- p.11 / Offset-onset Hypothesis and Onset-onset Hypothesis --- p.15 / Mismatch Negativity (MMN) --- p.17 / The Present Study --- p.19 / Hypothesis --- p.21 / Figure 2. --- p.22 / Figure 3. --- p.23 / Table 1. --- p.25 / Chapter CHAPTER 2 --- Experiment 1 --- p.26 / Method --- p.26 / Design --- p.26 / Participants --- p.26 / Stimuli and Procedure --- p.27 / Figure 4. --- p.28 / Figure 5. --- p.30 / Electrophysiological Recording and Data Analysis --- p.31 / Result --- p.33 / Figure 6. --- p.34 / Table 2. --- p.35 / Discussion --- p.36 / Table 3. --- p.38 / Chapter CHAPTER 3 --- Experiment 2 --- p.41 / Table 4. --- p.42 / Method --- p.44 / Design --- p.44 / Participants --- p.44 / Stimuli and Procedure --- p.44 / Figure 7a. --- p.46 / Figure 7b. --- p.47 / Electrophysiological Recording and Data Analysis --- p.48 / Result --- p.49 / Figure 8. --- p.51 / Figure 9. --- p.52 / Table 5. --- p.53 / Table 6. --- p.54 / Table 7. --- p.55 / Discussion --- p.56 / Table 8. --- p.58 / Chapter CHAPTER 4 --- Experiment 3 --- p.59 / Method --- p.60 / Design --- p.60 / Participants --- p.60 / Stimuli and Procedure --- p.60 / Table 9. --- p.63 / Electrophysiological Recording and Data Analysis --- p.64 / Table 10. --- p.67 / Result --- p.68 / Figure 10. --- p.69 / Table 11. --- p.70 / Table 12. --- p.72 / Discussion --- p.73 / Chapter CHAPTER 5 --- General Discussion --- p.76 / Temporal Structure and Early Timing Stage --- p.77 / Pre-attentive Timing and Attentive Timing --- p.77 / Alternative Explanation --- p.81 / Conclusion --- p.83 / REFERENCES --- p.84 / APPENDIX A Consent Form --- p.92 / APPENDIX B The Edinburgh Handedness Inventory --- p.94
27

A test of Bateman's hypothesis in terms of male and female time division strategies

Richards, Laura A January 2011 (has links)
Digitized by Kansas Correctional Industries
28

The three arrows

Gaut, Patricia J., University of Western Sydney, Faculty of Humanities January 1995 (has links)
This thesis is an exploration of the concept of time and its influence on literature. It is presented through an original novel, ‘The three arrows’, a critical reflection on this work, and an essay exploring the catalyst of change generated by the perception of time. The novel is inspired by Stephen Hawking’s ‘A brief history of time’ and his ‘arrows of time’: the thermodynamic arrow, in which entropy increases; the psychological arrow, the direction in which we feel time pass; and the cosmological arrow, the direction of time in which the universe expands. The literary techniques adopted in the writing of the novel are discussed, as is the author’s research into the construction of time in literary discourse and its relationship to religious, philosophical, historical and psychological constructions. The catalytic force of scientific thought and discovery as it resonates through these fields is traced. Modernist and Postmodernist writing is examined, the Modernists with their technique of time-displacement and the Postmodernists with their exploration of randomness and discontinuity in the belief that it is the profound and discernable effect of the entropy and escalating change in a world of scientific uncertainty on the writing process itself. / Doctor of Philosophy (PhD)
29

Factors associated with perceived time pressure among Canadian working parents : does gender make a difference?

Fitzpatrick, Terrie 07 September 2011
The perception of not having enough time to do all of the things one needs to get done appears to be on the rise across industrialized nations. In Canada, for example, 16.4% of the population reported high levels of pressure in 1992, compared with 19.7% in 2005. Understanding the factors associated with perceived time pressure is important for public health, particularly given research suggesting that perceptions of time pressure are increasing in Western society and that such perceptions are linked with social and mental well-being. The overall goal of this study was to better understand the patterning of perceived time pressure among working mothers and fathers in Canada according to whether they occupied the additional role of partner and/or caregiver, as well as according to characteristics associated with their paid work and family roles. The Gender, Work, and Family Health Survey, conducted in Saskatoon Canada in 2005 provided the data for this study. The total sample was 1160 (674 women and 486 men). Results of the multiple linear regression analyses showed that both role occupancy and role quality were related to perceived time pressure among employed parents but that the precise nature of these relationships depends on gender. For mothers, the following factors were associated with increased time pressure: occupancy of an unpaid caregiving role, parenting a child with at least one health/behavioral problem, agreement with the statements <i>"parenting makes me feel drained or exhausted"</i> or <i>"parenting makes me feel tense and anxious"</i>, and low perceived social support. Regarding the paid work environment, women who were categorized as high strain (ie., high demands/low control) or active (high demands/high control) also reported higher levels of time pressure. For fathers, the following variables were associated with greater time pressure: occupancy of the partner role, being a multiple job holder and having a high strain (ie., high demands/low control) or active (high demands/high control) psychosocial work environment. Limitations of the study are discussed as are the policy implications of the findings.
30

Factors associated with perceived time pressure among Canadian working parents : does gender make a difference?

Fitzpatrick, Terrie 07 September 2011 (has links)
The perception of not having enough time to do all of the things one needs to get done appears to be on the rise across industrialized nations. In Canada, for example, 16.4% of the population reported high levels of pressure in 1992, compared with 19.7% in 2005. Understanding the factors associated with perceived time pressure is important for public health, particularly given research suggesting that perceptions of time pressure are increasing in Western society and that such perceptions are linked with social and mental well-being. The overall goal of this study was to better understand the patterning of perceived time pressure among working mothers and fathers in Canada according to whether they occupied the additional role of partner and/or caregiver, as well as according to characteristics associated with their paid work and family roles. The Gender, Work, and Family Health Survey, conducted in Saskatoon Canada in 2005 provided the data for this study. The total sample was 1160 (674 women and 486 men). Results of the multiple linear regression analyses showed that both role occupancy and role quality were related to perceived time pressure among employed parents but that the precise nature of these relationships depends on gender. For mothers, the following factors were associated with increased time pressure: occupancy of an unpaid caregiving role, parenting a child with at least one health/behavioral problem, agreement with the statements <i>"parenting makes me feel drained or exhausted"</i> or <i>"parenting makes me feel tense and anxious"</i>, and low perceived social support. Regarding the paid work environment, women who were categorized as high strain (ie., high demands/low control) or active (high demands/high control) also reported higher levels of time pressure. For fathers, the following variables were associated with greater time pressure: occupancy of the partner role, being a multiple job holder and having a high strain (ie., high demands/low control) or active (high demands/high control) psychosocial work environment. Limitations of the study are discussed as are the policy implications of the findings.

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