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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
11

The differential effects of personality, placebos and suggestion on timing behavior

Luoto, Kenneth, January 1961 (has links)
Thesis--University of Pittsburgh. / Includes bibliographical references.
12

Exploring time perception and related neural activity in ADHD and non-ADHD young adults.

Viviers, Jean-Pierre 05 September 2014 (has links)
Attention-Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) is one of the most prevalent disorders diagnosed in children. However, less is known about the clinical manifestation of the disorder in adults and the impact thereof on for instance social and occupational functioning. With respect to temporal perception deficits in both child and adult ADHD, contemporary findings have produced mixed results. In line with this, the current investigation aimed to identify whether young adults who possess significant ADHD symptomology have pure time perception deficits and/or differences in self-reported habitual time perception. Stratification of the ADHD and non-ADHD group was achieved using the Adult ADHD Self-report Scale (ASRS V1.1). Between group differences in self-reported temporal orientation was investigated using the Zimbardo Time Perspective Inventory (ZTPI). These outcome scores were compared using an ANOVA. The investigation into pure psychophysical time perception was conducted on a sub sample of that used in the self-report investigation. The ADHD group consisted of 12 participants whereas the non-ADHD group consisted of 10 participants. These two groups conducted temporal estimation and temporal discrimination tasks. Between groups, performances on these tasks were compared using an ANOVA. In addition to this, electroencephalography (EEG) recordings of frontal, frontal midline and parietal activity during resting states and task performance were conducted. This allowed for between group comparisons in absolute and relative power scores at four different frequency bands (delta, theta, alpha and beta) to be made. A non-parametric Mann-Whitney-U test was used in this regard. The same statistical technique was used to compare the theta/beta ratios elicited by the resting state and temporal perception conditions. Results showed that those with significant ADHD symptomology have a characteristically different selfreported habitual time perception. This is illustrated by negative thoughts towards past and present life events, and an absence of future orientated behaviour. In terms of the objective psychophysical measures, the current investigation found no group differences in estimation or discrimination task performance. Despite this absence of difference, the group with significant ADHD symptomology showed significantly different EEG recorded neural activity, during resting states and during task performance. The nature of this activity was in line with a generalised cortical under arousal hypothesis of ADHD. Taken together, these findings indicate that individuals with significant ADHD symptomology do not only consciously perceive time differently to those who do not have significant symptomology, but also show different neuro-physiological processes when performing tasks that require the utilisation of temporal processing mechanisms. In this way, the findings provide insight into possible objective measures that could be utilised in ADHD diagnosis.
13

The child's concept of time : the role of velocity, spatial displacement, and duration of motion

Clarke, Kenneth Allan. January 1978 (has links)
No description available.
14

Cognitive States while Mind Wandering and Associated Alterations in Time Perception

Kelly, Megan Erin 08 1900 (has links)
Time perception is a fundamental aspect of consciousness related to mental health. One cognitive state related to time perception is mind wandering (MW), defined as having thoughts unrelated to the current task. Little research has directly assessed the relationship between these two constructs, despite the overlap in clinical significance and the shared importance of attention for healthy functioning. In the present study, I addressed this by having a sample of 40 adults in the United States complete an online sustained attention to response task remotely while answering thought probes related to thought type and time perception. Multilevel modeling results indicated that cognitive factors were related to the judgements of passage of time (JOPOTs; the feeling that time is passing quickly or slowly) while they had little relation to the estimated duration or the accuracy of those estimations. Specifically, JOPOTs were related to attention to task and emotional valence, and the addition of MW, intentionality, and fixed/dynamic thoughts to the models explained additional variance. Duration estimations and JOPOTs were unrelated to each other, suggesting JOPOTs and duration estimations have different relationships to cognitive factors and should be studied as separate constructs. Additionally, results suggested that the heavy use of dichotomization in the MW literature should be shifted in favor of conceptualizing attention to task as a continuous variable. The difference in effects of MW on estimation durations and JOPOTs specifically is novel finding. This is the first study to evaluate the relationship between MW and both duration estimations and JOPOTs, thus it may advance mechanistic and phenomenological understanding of MW which could in turn inform clinical theories of time perception in disorders including ADHD and depression.
15

Metaphysics through metaphors towards an understanding of time in psychology with William James's Principles of psychology /

Noël, Daniel A. January 1998 (has links)
Thesis (M.A.)--York University, 1998. Graduate Programme in Psychology. / Typescript. Includes bibliographical references (leaves 141-155). Also available on the Internet. MODE OF ACCESS via web browser by entering the following URL: http://wwwlib.umi.com/cr/yorku/fullcit?pMQ39218.
16

Temporal experience in depressed patients

Wyrick, Richard Arthur, 1944- January 1971 (has links)
No description available.
17

The young child's perception of duration /

Esses, Lillian Merlene. January 1978 (has links)
No description available.
18

Influence de la direction du mouvement actif sur l'estimation du temps

Paoletti, René F. January 1973 (has links)
No description available.
19

The child's concept of time : the role of velocity, spatial displacement, and duration of motion

Clarke, Kenneth Allan. January 1978 (has links)
No description available.
20

Use of elemental and configural coding in timing of compound stimuli

Wilhelmsen, Seth R. January 2007 (has links) (PDF)
Thesis (M.S.)--Auburn University, 2007. / Abstract. Vita. Includes bibliographic references (ℓ. 42-47)

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