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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
1

The process mineralogy of selected Southern African uranium ores

Youlton, Brandon 06 May 2015 (has links)
A thesis submitted to the Faculty of Science, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, in fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy. Johannesburg, December 2014. / During the acid leaching of uranium, gangue-reagent interactions have both negative and positive consequences. Gangue dissolution increases reagent costs, and in some cases can prevent the economic acid leaching of an ore, but can also increase uranium mineral exposure and improve recoveries. Due to rapid dissolution kinetics, the acid consumption characteristics of the various carbonate species are readily predicted, however the same is not true of silicate gangue. Due to factors including slower leach rates, incongruent dissolution, parabolic kinetics, and surface area, pH and temperature dependence, the gangue acid consumption characteristics of silicate minerals are significantly more complex. A detailed mineralogical investigation and acid leach tests were conducted on sandstone- and granite-hosted uranium ore samples. The dissolution characteristics of the more common gangue phases were determined. The study demonstrated that gangue-reagent interactions and U dissolution can be predicted from mineralogical data. A model was developed which allows for the use of mineralogical and geochemical data to predict gangue reagent consumption. The basic framework of the model is universally applicable, but may require calibration, depending on the mineral assemblage and complexity of a specific uranium deposit.
2

The application of artificial thermoluminescence to uranium exploration and uranium ore genesis studies

Hochman, Mark Brett McEwen. January 1989 (has links) (PDF)
Typescript (Photocopy) Includes copies of 5 published papers co-authored by the author in back Bibliography: leaves 214-230
3

The application of artificial thermoluminescence to uranium exploration and uranium ore genesis studies / by Mark Brett McEwen Hochman

Hochman, Mark Brett McEwen January 1989 (has links)
Typescript (Photocopy) / Includes copies of 5 published papers co-authored by the author in back / Bibliography: leaves 214-230 / xi, 230, [86] leaves : ill., maps (some col.) ; 30 cm. / Title page, contents and abstract only. The complete thesis in print form is available from the University Library. / Thesis (Ph.D.)--University of Adelaide, Dept. of Geology and Geophysics, 1990
4

The significance of unconformities in the development of Witwatersrand gold and uranium placers

Beater, Christian Douglas 03 April 2013 (has links)
Most of the economic gold and uranium placers are developed on low angle disconformities in the Central Rand Group and concentrations of gold and uranium are usually at their optimum on unconformity surfaces. Examples include the Kimberley Reef and South Reef of the East Rand, the Main Reef Leader of the Central Rand, the Carbon Leader of the Carletonville goldfield, the Vaal Reef of the Klerksdorp goldfield and the Basal/Steyn placers of the Welkom goldfield. The individual goldfields represent fluvial fans which are composed of a large number of tectonogenetic sedimentary packages separated by unconformities. The tectonic responses between cycles of sedimentation produced unconformities and tectonically controlled cyclic sedimentation is one of the key factors culminating in the preparation and deposition of auriferous placers within the Witwatersrand succession. Unconformities, which represent breaks in sedimentation, result in the preconditioning of palaeosurfaces and redistribution of sediments and heavy minerals on them. Winnowing of sands produced heavy mineral residual accumulations on erosion surfaces which were generally preserved by small-pebble lags or algal mats. Reworking of units truncated by the unconformities provided additional gold, uranium and heavy minerals to unconformity surfaces.
5

Preliminary hydraulic characterization of a fractured schist aquifer at the Koongarra uranium deposit, Northern Territory, Australia

Norris, James, 1953- January 1989 (has links)
The Koongarra uranium deposit is hosted by quartz-chlorite schists. A conceptual model for the hydrogeology of the deposit is proposed on the basis of lithologic criteria and limited hydraulic testing. Water-level and aquifer-test data are presented that indicate the deposit lies within a partially confined, heterogeneous, anisotropic fractured-rock aquifer. The aquifer is dynamic with annual, diurnal, and semidiurnal water-level fluctuations. The results of aquifer tests indicate a high degree of connectivity in the aquifer. Fracture-dominated flow is observed in some tests, but the overall aquifer response appears to be that of an equivalent porous medium. A homogeneous, anisotropic model is used to estimate the transmissivity tensor for subregions of the aquifer. Anisotropy is well-developed with north- to east-northeast-oriented principal transmissivities. Northeast directions represent large-scale drawdown patterns and are subparallel to bedrock structure and the Koongarra fault. Northerly directions are localized and may reflect a less extensive fracture fabric or a flexure in the bedrock foliation.

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