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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
1

Subclinical Vascular Brain Damage, Vascular Risk Factors, and Depression in Successful Cognitive Aging

Warsch, Jessica 01 May 2010 (has links)
Currently, about one in every eight Americans is age 65 or older; by the year 2050, it will be one in five people. Given this “graying” of the population, research into successful aging is of increasing relevance. The question of how to precisely define successful aging, however, has not been completely answered. Likewise, the role of vascular risk factors, subclinical vascular brain damage, and other biopsychosocial characteristics in normal cognitive aging are not well understood. This Dissertation focused on the identification of some of the physiological, behavioral, and social risk factors that distinguish people able to maintain extraordinary health at an advanced age. Specifically, we aimed to create an ecologically valid definition of successful aging that incorporates both physical well-being and cognitive abilities, and to report the prevalence of successful cognitive aging in a population-based multi-ethnic cohort of older adults. We sought to describe how the prevalence varies by several sociodemographic and psychosocial determinants, and to investigate global vascular risk, depressive symptomatology, and MRI markers of subclinical vascular brain damage as correlates of successful cognitive aging. We observed the prevalence of successful cognitive aging to be 37% in the study sample (N=1,162) of a diverse racial/ethnic population in Northern Manhattan (NYC, NY). The prevalence decreased with increasing age; we did not observe any differences by racial/ethnic group, but did note a lower prevalence with lower socioeconomic status. Several social resources and self-reported quality of life were related to successful cognitive aging, and appeared more important than demographic variables alone. We found that the likelihood of successful cognitive aging decreases with increasing global vascular risk score, more severe depressive symptomatology, and greater white matter damage. The field of successful aging requires further study. Consideration of such biopsychosocial factors as socioeconomic status, social support, quality of life, and depressive symptoms alongside novel indicators of disease and disability including global vascular risk and white matter hyperintensity burden is essential. It may lead to a more robust definition of successful cognitive aging replete with opportunities to modify the aging process, as many of the factors investigated in this study are modifiable.
2

CEREBROVASCULAR RISK FACTORS, ARTERIOLAR SCLEROSIS, AND COGNITIVE DECLINE IN THE KENTUCKY APPALACHIAN “STROKE-BELT”

Al-Janabi, Omar M. 01 January 2016 (has links)
The relationship between cerebrovascular disease (CVD) risk factors and cognitive impairment or dementia has been widely studied with significant variability in findings between groups. We hypothesized that chronic small vessel injury in the form of arteriolar sclerosis, measured quantitatively using MRI to measure total white matter hyperintensity (WMH) volumes, would identify specific association of CVD risk factors and patterns of cognitive decline, associated with mild cognitive impairment of the cerebrovascular type, that represent the core features of vascular cognitive impairment in our cohort. A Cross-sectional analysis of clinical and quantitative MRI data on 114 subjects with normal cognitive function (n=52) and mild cognitive impairment (MCI; n=62) was performed. Quantitative total WMH volumes were examined in relation to potentially causative CVD risk factors and resultant test scores across cognitive domains using linear regression models adjusted for age, gender, and education. Among CVD risk factors analyzed, age (p< 0.001), education (p= 0.003), hypertension (p= 0.012), and hyperlipidemia (p= 0.008) demonstrated the strongest associations with WMH volumes. Conversely, diabetes, smoking, history of heart attacks, atrial fibrillation, and history of stroke that have shown associations with CVD pathology on imaging in other studies were not statistically associated with increased WMH in this cohort. WMH volumes were associated with decrease performance on the Trial Making Test type A & B and long delayed free recall on the California Verbal Learning Test. Our findings suggest similarities and yet differences in comparison to other studies. Hypertension and hyperlipidemia appear to represent common shared risks across geographically disparate groups. Our findings, like others, suggest CVD pathology impact processing speed and executive function and provide further evidence for CVD effects on short-term memory in those at risk for cognitive decline and the future development of dementia in our cohort.
3

Immunologisches Profil und PrPC-Expression von Patienten mit subkortikaler vaskulärer Enzephalopathie und vaskulärem kognitivem Impairment / Immunological profile and PrPC expression of patients with subcortical vascular encephalopathy and vascular cognitive impairment

Oikonomou, Panteleimon 21 March 2017 (has links)
No description available.
4

[pt] INSTRUMENTOS DE RASTREIO PARA O COMPROMETIMENTO COGNITIVO VASCULAR SUBCORTICAL: REVISÃO DA LITERATURA E ADAPTAÇÃO DO BRIEF MEMORY AND EXECUTIVE TEST (BMET) AO CONTEXTO BRASILEIRO / [en] SCREENING INSTRUMENTS FOR SUBCORTICAL VASCULAR COGNITIVE IMPAIRMENT: LITERATURE REVIEW AND BRAZILIAN ADAPTATION OF THE BRIEF MEMORY AND EXECUTIVE TEST (BMET)

BARBARA GILLY NARDY 20 December 2019 (has links)
[pt] O Comprometimento cognitivo vascular subcortical (CCVs) caracteriza-se, do ponto de vista cognitivo, por déficits em funções executivas em seus estágios iniciais, levando a dificuldades funcionais precoces na população acometida. Contudo, dados da literatura indicaram que a condição é frequentemente subdiagnosticada, o que pode ser atribuído, dentre outras razões, à falta de instrumentos de rastreio acurados para a condição, cujas características clínicas diferem dos quadros neurodegenerativos. Esta escassez foi evidenciada pela revisão sistemática realizada como parte do presente trabalho. O Teste Breve de Memória e Funções Executivas (BMET) foi desenvolvido por Brookes e cols. (2012) especificamente para a detecção destes quadros clínicos. O objetivo desta dissertação foi discorrer sobre o CCVs e adaptar o BMET para o uso na população acima dos 60 anos do Brasil. Para tanto, seguiram-se etapas de tradução, avaliação de juízes de linguística e de neuropsicologia, avaliação por representante do público-alvo, retrotradução e, por fim, aplicação à amostra. Foi conduzido um estudo piloto para verificar a aplicabilidade e fornecer dados psicométricos preliminares do teste. Conclui-se que o BMET é de simples e rápida aplicação, podendo ser administrado por diferentes profissionais da saúde e possivelmente adequado à atenção primária em saúde. Considerando o contexto atual de um rápido envelhecimento populacional e do consequente aumento na prevalência de agravos associados às faixas etárias avançadas, tais como os transtornos neurocognitivos, é de grande relevância a detecção precoce do CCVs visando ao planejamento de intervenções e medidas de profilaxia secundária, contribuindo assim, para a qualidade de vida da população idosa. / [en] Subcortical Vascular Cognitive Impairment (sVCI) is characterized, upon a cognitive perspective, by the presence of dysexecutive function in its initial stages, leading to early functional difficulties for sufferers of this condition. However, data has indicated that it is often underdiagnosed, which could be attributed to the lack of accurate screening tools for the disorder. This shortcoming has been evidenced by a systematic review conducted as part of the current project. The Brief Memory and Executive Test (BMET) has been specifically developed by Brookes et al. (2012) for the detection of sVCI. This thesis aimed to discuss about sVCI and to adapt BMET for use in subjects over 60 years old from Brazil. For this purpose, consecutive stages, comprising translation, evaluation by experts in linguistics and neuropsychology, assessment by representant of the target population, retro-translation and, finally, application to an older sample, have been performed. A pilot study has been carried out to analyze the applicability and to draw preliminary information about psychometric properties of the scale. In conclusion, BMET has revealed to be easy and rapid to administer, feasible to be applied by different categories of health practitioners and possibly adequate for primary health settings. Considering the current context of a fast population aging and a rise in the prevalence of conditions associated with late-life, such as neurocognitive disorders, it is relevant to detect sVCI in its early stages, so that therapeutic and secondary preventive strategies could be planned, which could impact on the quality of lives of older population.

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