• Refine Query
  • Source
  • Publication year
  • to
  • Language
  • 3
  • 1
  • Tagged with
  • 6
  • 6
  • 4
  • 4
  • 4
  • 3
  • 3
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2
  • 1
  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
1

Non contact measurement of wear induced changes in surface potential

Hamall, Kenneth Michael 05 1900 (has links)
No description available.
2

A novel sensor to monitor surface charge interactions the optically stimulated contact potential difference probe /

Mess, Francis M. January 2006 (has links)
Thesis (Ph. D.)--Mechanical Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, 2006. / Steven Danyluk, Committee Chair ; Thomas Kurfess, Committee Member ; Peter Hesketh, Committee Member ; Jiri Janata, Committee Member ; Ajeet Rohatgi, Committee Member.
3

A Novel Sensor to Monitor Surface Charge Interactions: The Optically Stimulated Contact Potential Difference Probe

Mess, Francis McCarthy 17 February 2006 (has links)
This study addresses the development of a sensor to monitor chemical adsorption and charge transfer processes on a surface using a contact potential difference probe (CPD). The current investigation is an outgrowth of ongoing research on non-vibrating CPD probes (nvCPD) which led to the recent development of a novel measurement technique utilizing optical stimulation: optically stimulated CPD (osCPD). Primary outcomes of this thesis are the theoretical modeling, fabrication and demonstration of a functional osCPD sensor. The research also involved significant engineering and experimentation in the design, development, and application of this sensor to oil condition monitoring. This technique measures dielectric and chemical properties of a fluid at the interface between the fluid and a semiconductor substrate. Chopped visible light is used to stimulate the rear surface of a semiconductor substrate, and a CPD probe measures the work function response of the semiconductor on the front surface of the substrate. The work function response is influenced by the nature and quantity of adsorbed species on the top surface, allowing the probe to detect changes in chemical composition at the substrate/fluid interface. An analytical model is developed that relates the osCPD sensor output signal to the chemical and dielectric properties of the oil sample, as well as to the geometry, composition, and control inputs of the silicon substrate and test fixture. In this investigation, the osCPD sensor was used to evaluate dielectric and chemical properties of commercially available engine oil. Oil samples were intentionally degraded through thermal aging (oxidation) and through addition of known contaminants. The osCPD sensor shows good sensitivity to depletion of antioxidants in the oil, as well as to the presence of ferric chloride, an oil-soluble salt typically used to calibrate laboratory test equipment.
4

Vibrating CPD Chemical Degradation Oil Sensor

Tsiareshka, Siarhei G. 23 May 2006 (has links)
Oil analysis is a broad field comprised of hundreds of individual tests that provide meaningful benefit by assessing one or more properties of lubricants or machines. Many tests are performed on new types of oil during research and development. The lubricants chemical, physical, or lubricating properties are validated for quality control purposes and product performance classification. Much of the research in this area is devoted to the online oil degradation systems which allow getting a prompt response about the condition of lubricant. This thesis investigates the concept for monitoring oil degradation with a vibrating Kelvin probe technique. The Vibrating Kelvin probe method for measuring the work function of metals has been used since 1932. Among the applications of this technique are adsorption, corrosion, friction and other studies. A novel application of this method is proposed in this thesis. The vibrating Kelvin system was created with one static surface acting as a sampling surface and the other one electrically isolated. The interaction of the oil with one of the surfaces of a capacitor results in a signal which is synchronously measured. The oil molecules adsorb on the surface of one of the plates and form a space charge layer which changes the work function of that surface. Oil prepared by intentional oxidation was used to evaluate and to monitor the ability to see changes in oil.
5

Dynamic terrain following: nvCPD scanning technique improvement

Pyekh, Yury B. 19 May 2010 (has links)
There is a large number of measurement techniques that is used for a surface inspection and a characterization of different types of materials. One of these techniques is a contact potential difference (CPD) scanning technique. In this project a non-vibrating contact potential difference (nvCPD) method is utilized to measure a work function and a topographical structure of a sample surface. A sample is mounted on a spindle that rotates at high speed. A nvCPD sensor detects work-function variations during movement above the sample surface. There are certain factors that create difficulties during the measurement process. A nonplanar sample surface, the spindle wobble and an incline of a mounted sample impede the safe (without impacting the surface) scanning at a close distance. The goal of this thesis was to implement a height sensor as a feedback device to dynamically control and adjust a CPD sensor flying height. Since a CPD signal is inversely proportional to the flying height, minimization of this height will enhance the signal magnitude, the signal-to-noise ratio and the resolution of measurements.
6

Fringe Field Corrections in nvCPD Probe Tip Applications

Watt, Andrew 12 July 2004 (has links)
This thesis addresses the fabrication, evaluation, and analysis of the probe tip of a non-vibrating contact potential difference sensor. The non-vibrating contact potential difference (nvCPD) probe measures the work function variation on a conducting surface and recent experiments performed to measure the size of surface features have shown poor correlation between actual and calculated probe tip dimensions. In order to address this deficiency, experiments were done and an analytical model was developed, including fringe electrical fields, that predicts the shape of the nvCPD probe signal as a function of probe tip geometry, work function variation, and experimental parameters. Probe tips were constructed with varying geometric properties and experiments using these probe tips were compared to a model. There was good correlation of the nvCPD probe output for a known work function change and probe tip geometry. The effective area of the probe tip resulting from electrical field fringing is expected to increase with dielectric thickness to a finite value, based on pre-existing electrostatic models for a shielded parallel plate capacitor. The minimum fringe field obtained in these experiments was for a 3.18mm diameter probe tip with a dielectric thickness of 0.20mm. The fringe field diameter was 3.38mm at a fly height of 0.60mm, representing an effective probe tip area increase of 13%.

Page generated in 0.0294 seconds