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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
1

We who are about to... : FEMALE CHARACTERS IN SCIENCE FICTION REPRESENTING WOMEN’S STRUGGLE AGAINST MALE OPPRESSION

Schmidt, Marlene January 2013 (has links)
This essay uses feminist theory to examine whether the female narrator in Joanna Russ science fiction novel We who are about to… can be viewed as a personification of women’s struggle against an oppressive male society. The thesis of the essay is that the female narrator’s struggle against the male oppressors in the novel represents the struggle for women’s rights in Western society. The essay will also examine if teaching feminist theory and including women science fiction writers in the classroom will promote gender equality and thus fulfil the requirements of the Swedish curriculum.
2

Mary Wollstonecraft and Jane Austen - opponents or allies?

Ross, Elizabeth Ann January 1991 (has links)
No description available.
3

Gendering mimesis : realism and feminism in the works of Annie Ernaux and Claire Etcherelli

McIlvanney, S. J. January 1994 (has links)
No description available.
4

The poetics and politics of contemporary Irish women's poetry : a study of the poetry of Eavan Boland, Medbh McGuckian and Eilean Ni Chuilleanain

Tellis, Ashley Jude Mario January 1999 (has links)
No description available.
5

The fiction of Anna Kavan (1901-1968)

Walker, Victoria Carborne January 2012 (has links)
This thesis is a study of the British writer Anna Kavan (1901-1968). It begins by tracing Kavan’s life and examining the mythologies around her radical selfreinvention (in adopting the name of her own fictional character), madness and drug addiction. It attempts to map a place for her previously neglected work in twentieth-century women’s writing and criticism. Close reading of Kavan’s fiction attends to her uses of narrative voice in representing a divided self. Given Kavan’s treatment by the Swiss existential psychiatrist Ludwig Binswanger, the thesis explores connections between her writing and the British anti-psychiatry movement, especially R D Laing. Focussing primarily on the Modernist and Postmodern aspects of Kavan’s work, it also notes Gothic and Romantic inflections in her writing, establishing thematic continuity with her early Helen Ferguson novels. The first chapter looks at Kavan’s first collection of stories, Asylum Piece (1940) and her experimental novel, Sleep Has His House (1947). It reads her portrait of institutionalization as a nascent critique of asylum treatment, and considers Anaïs Nin’s longstanding interest in her work. Chapter Two draws on research into Kavan’s experiences during the Second World War, particularly her time working with soldiers in a military psychiatric hospital. Reading her second collection of stories I Am Lazarus (1945) as Blitz writing, it connects her fiction with her Horizon article ‘The Case of Bill Williams’ (1944) and explores the pacifist and anarchistic views in her writing. The third chapter, a reading of the novel Who Are You? (1963), argues that Kavan engages with existential philosophy in this text and explores parallels with Jean Rhys’ Wide Sargasso Sea. The final chapter looks at Kavan’s last and best known work, Ice (1967). Following Doris Lessing, this chapter reads the novel’s sadism as a political response to the Second World War. Contesting critical interpretations which have pathologized Kavan’s fiction as solipsistic representations of her own experiences, this thesis aims to resituate her as a politically-engaged writer of her time.
6

The emergence of women's creative identity through narrative construction

Murray, Alison Elaine January 2002 (has links)
Thesis (Ed.D.)--Boston University / PLEASE NOTE: Boston University Libraries did not receive an Authorization To Manage form for this thesis or dissertation. It is therefore not openly accessible, though it may be available by request. If you are the author or principal advisor of this work and would like to request open access for it, please contact us at open-help@bu.edu. Thank you. / This dissertation investigated whether women's traditional work, that is, the work of nurturing others, could rightly be classified as a form of creative expression. This was achieved through a theoretical analysis of the concept of creativity and a qualitative study of Virginia Woolf's creative identity as articulated in her female character, Clarissa Dalloway, in her novel, Mrs. Dalloway (1925/1993) and coeval diary entries (1978, 1980). Five historical epochs were identified in the history of the concept of creativity, which were thematically determined, including, 1) ancient philosophies, 2) philosophies of the 4th to 15th centuries, 3) philosophies of the 16th to 18th centuries, 4) philosophies of the 19th century, and, finally, 5) philosophies of the 20th century. Whereas men's evolving conceptualizations of creativity were largely categorical, and appeared to value rationalism, individualism, control, mastery, and even superiority, women's generated systems of thought were more characteristically integrative, systemic, practical, and intent on the interpersonal. The study of Virginia Woolf's narrative revealed the same. In the process of writing her novel, Mrs. Dalloway (1925/1993), Woolf and her character, Clarissa Dalloway, were simultaneously recreated. Both of these women's creative identities, in fact, were inherently relational, as opposed to individualistic and isolated-a creative identity that is consistent with traditional models of men's development. Findings revealed from both the theoretical study of the concept of creativity and Virginia Woolfs creativity identity were used to construct a more universal theory of creativity that acknowledged the developmental strengths of both men and women. Additionally, findings were discussed relative to optimism, the narrative construction of a woman's creative identity, and education. / 2031-01-01
7

Neither Wholly Public, Nor Wholly Private: Interstitial Spaces in Works by Nineteenth-Century American Women Writers

Green-Barteet, Miranda A. 2009 August 1900 (has links)
This project examines the representation of architectural and metaphoric spaces in the works of four nineteenth-century American women writers: Harriet Wilson, Harriet Jacobs, Elizabeth Stuart Phelps, and Edith Wharton. I focus on what I call interstitial spaces: spaces that are neither wholly public nor private but that exist somewhere in between the public and private realms. Interstitial spaces are locations that women writers claim to resist the predominantly private restrictions of the family or the predominantly public conventions of society. Interstitiality becomes a border space that enables women writers?both for themselves and for their fictional characters?to redefine, rearrange, and challenge the expectations of public and private spaces in the nineteenth century. This dissertation investigates how nineteenth-century American women writers create interstitial spaces. Further, it demonstrates how they use such spaces to express their views, manipulate the divisions between the public and private realms, and defy societal and familial conventions. Since the mid-1970s, critics have been analyzing public and private under the assumption that the boundaries between the spheres were more porous than originally thought. This project adds to the critical dialogue concerning the separation of public and private realms as the conceptual framework of criticism shifts from an increased awareness of gender, race, and class. My project responds to the growing trend of analyzing literary works through architectural and spatial theories. While applying such theories, I focus on how race and class affect a writer's ability to create interstitial spaces. I further respond to this trend by considering authors who have not yet been included in this way, namely Wilson and Phelps. By analyzing the physical and rhetorical ways these authors manipulate space, I offer an account of gender, race, and class along with architectural and spatial concepts that juxtaposes authors who have not yet been considered together. My dissertation offers a new critical vocabulary to consider writers' representations of spaces by employing the word interstitial, which no other critic uses. I specifically use interstitial to describe spaces that exist between the public and private realms and describe the transformation in space that occurs through spatial and rhetorical manipulation.
8

A biographical and critical study of the life and work of Elizabeth Carey, 1st Viscountess Falkland (1585-1639)

Wright, Stephanie J. January 1994 (has links)
This thesis argues for a full recognition of the significance of Elizabeth Carey and her literary works by offering new theoretical and critical approaches to her life and her two major works, The Tragedy of Mariam and The History of the Life, Reign and Death of Edward II. The Introduction offers an assessment of the recent critical works on Elizabeth Carey and ultimately rejects the prevalent tendency to interpret her works simply in terms of her life. Chapter 1 constitutes a biographical study of Elizabeth Carey which focuses upon the roles she played: as wife, recusant and writer. Chapter 2 examines Carey's use of two sources of "patriarchal" authority - Seneca and Flavius Josephus - in her composition of The Tragedy of Mariam. It explores the ways in which she manipulates these sources in order to create a text which offers resistance to patriarchal authority. Chapter 3 is a reading of The Tragedy of Mariam which eschews the traditional critical opposition between "virtuous" and "vicious" characters in the text. Rather, the text is viewed as a set of competing discourses which, by their very competition, effect a de construction of patriarchal ideology. Chapter 4 seeks to re-establish Carey's claim to the authorship of The History of the Life, Reign and Death of Edward II. This issue of authorship has been confused by the existence of the text in a longer, folio form and a shorter, octavo form. Here, I argue against a recent publication to show that Carey is the author of the folio but not the octavo. Chapter 5 focuses upon the historical and literary contexts of The History of the Life, Reign and Death of Edward II, beginning by exploring the possibility that the text is a criticism of Buckingham's role in the courts of James I and Charles I. The chapter then focuses upon the ways in which Carey rejects the characterisation of Queen Isabel by Drayton and Marlowe and constructs her own version of the history in which Isabel is both powerful and sympathetic.
9

'Same hell, different horrors' : women in the Holocaust : testimony into fiction

Johnson, Jay January 2001 (has links)
No description available.
10

“Think of yourself as a merchant” : L. T. Meade and the professional woman writer and editor at the Victorian fin de siècle

Dawson, Janis 14 September 2011 (has links)
L. T. Meade (1844-1914) was one of the most popular and industrious writers of the Victorian fin de siècle. She is remembered as the creator of the modern girls’ school story, but over the course of a professional career that spanned four decades, Meade wrote close to three hundred books and countless short stories in a variety of genres for readers of all ages. She also edited the highly regarded middle-class girls’ literary magazine Atalanta from 1887 to 1893. She was considered a literary celebrity by the influential Strand Magazine where her innovative medical mysteries and sensational stories of female criminals competed with the works of Arthur Conan Doyle, the creator of Sherlock Holmes. But Meade was more than a successful author. She was also an influential participant in London’s literary circles and an active member of numerous literary professional, and feminist associations. Despite the scope of Meade’s career and her significant presence in the literary marketplace, her name has now passed into relative obscurity. Assessments of Meade in the twentieth century have been limited, dismissive, and generally negative. But as I demonstrate in this dissertation, many of these assessments are based on a narrow reading of her girls’ fiction and an incomplete sense of her professional activity. This dissertation, based on a historically contextualized reading of a broad selection of Meade’s works, focuses on the author as a professional woman writer and editor and highlights some of her significant contributions to popular literature and popular culture generally. The chapters in this study are organized into sections that reflect the trajectory of Meade’s career. Part I, “Meade and the Market,” introduces Meade as a professional writer. It includes biographical information, a discussion of Meade’s self representation, and an examination of a selection of her texts to show how she identified literary trends and used topical issues to frame her stories and market them to publishers and the reading public. Part II, “Meade and Atalanta,” focuses on Meade as a professional woman editor. It consists of three linked chapters on Meade and the girls’ literary magazine Atalanta and includes an examination of Meade’s contributions to juvenile periodical literature as well as a discussion of Atalanta as a family literary magazine. Part III, “New Markets and New Genres,” focuses on Meade as a popular professional woman writer and examines her involvement with the popular press in the years following her departure from Atalanta. It shows how Meade’s involvement with the Strand Magazine signalled a new direction in her literary style and market orientation and highlights her significant contributions to detective and mystery fiction. Throughout this study, I argue that Meade was more than a popular girls’ author; she was also a successful professional woman writer and editor, a shrewd businesswoman, and a significant participant in the literary marketplace. I also argue that Meade’s career merits consideration because it offers important insights into the way fin-de-siècle women writers shaped their careers and positioned themselves in the literary marketplace. / Graduate / 10000-01-01

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