• Refine Query
  • Source
  • Publication year
  • to
  • Language
  • 2
  • Tagged with
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2
  • 1
  • 1
  • 1
  • 1
  • 1
  • 1
  • 1
  • 1
  • 1
  • 1
  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
1

Exploiting the structure of the web for spidering /

Young, Joel D. January 2005 (has links)
Thesis (Ph.D.)--Brown University, 2005. / Vita. Thesis advisor: Thomas L. Dean. Includes bibliographical references (leaves 185-191). Also available online.
2

Search Interaction Optimization: A Human-Centered Design Approach

Speicher, Maximilian 20 September 2016 (has links)
Over the past 25 years, search engines have become one of the most important, if not the entry point of the World Wide Web. This development has been primarily due to the continuously increasing amount of available documents, which are highly unstructured. Moreover, the general trend is towards classifying search results into categories and presenting them in terms of semantic information that answer users' queries without having to leave the search engine. With the growing amount of documents and technological enhancements, the needs of users as well as search engines are continuously evolving. Users want to be presented with increasingly sophisticated results and interfaces while companies have to place advertisements and make revenue to be able to offer their services for free. To address the above needs, it is more and more important to provide highly usable and optimized search engine results pages (SERPs). Yet, existing approaches to usability evaluation are often costly or time-consuming and mostly rely on explicit feedback. They are either not efficient or not effective while SERP interfaces are commonly optimized primarily from a company's point of view. Moreover, existing approaches to predicting search result relevance, which are mostly based on clicks, are not tailored to the evolving kinds of SERPs. For instance, they fail if queries are answered directly on a SERP and no clicks need to happen. Applying Human-Centered Design principles, we propose a solution to the above in terms of a holistic approach that intends to satisfy both, searchers and developers. It provides novel means to counteract exclusively company-centric design and to make use of implicit user feedback for efficient and effective evaluation and optimization of usability and, in particular, relevance. We define personas and scenarios from which we infer unsolved problems and a set of well-defined requirements. Based on these requirements, we design and develop the Search Interaction Optimization toolkit. Using a bottom-up approach, we moreover define an eponymous, higher-level methodology. The Search Interaction Optimization toolkit comprises a total of six components. We start with INUIT [1], which is a novel minimal usability instrument specifically aiming at meaningful correlations with implicit user feedback in terms of client-side interactions. Hence, it serves as a basis for deriving usability scores directly from user behavior. INUIT has been designed based on reviews of established usability standards and guidelines as well as interviews with nine dedicated usability experts. Its feasibility and effectiveness have been investigated in a user study. Also, a confirmatory factor analysis shows that the instrument can reasonably well describe real-world perceptions of usability. Subsequently, we introduce WaPPU [2], which is a context-aware A/B testing tool based on INUIT. WaPPU implements the novel concept of Usability-based Split Testing and enables automatic usability evaluation of arbitrary SERP interfaces based on a quantitative score that is derived directly from user interactions. For this, usability models are automatically trained and applied based on machine learning techniques. In particular, the tool is not restricted to evaluating SERPs, but can be used with any web interface. Building on the above, we introduce S.O.S., the SERP Optimization Suite [3], which comprises WaPPU as well as a catalog of best practices [4]. Once it has been detected that an investigated SERP's usability is suboptimal based on scores delivered by WaPPU, corresponding optimizations are automatically proposed based on the catalog of best practices. This catalog has been compiled in a three-step process involving reviews of existing SERP interfaces and contributions by 20 dedicated usability experts. While the above focus on the general usability of SERPs, presenting the most relevant results is specifically important for search engines. Hence, our toolkit contains TellMyRelevance! (TMR) [5] — the first end-to-end pipeline for predicting search result relevance based on users’ interactions beyond clicks. TMR is a fully automatic approach that collects necessary information on the client, processes it on the server side and trains corresponding relevance models based on machine learning techniques. Predictions made by these models can then be fed back into the ranking process of the search engine, which improves result quality and hence also usability. StreamMyRelevance! (SMR) [6] takes the concept of TMR one step further by providing a streaming-based version. That is, SMR collects and processes interaction data and trains relevance models in near real-time. Based on a user study and large-scale log analysis involving real-world search engines, we have evaluated the components of the Search Interaction Optimization toolkit as a whole—also to demonstrate the interplay of the different components. S.O.S., WaPPU and INUIT have been engaged in the evaluation and optimization of a real-world SERP interface. Results show that our tools are able to correctly identify even subtle differences in usability. Moreover, optimizations proposed by S.O.S. significantly improved the usability of the investigated and redesigned SERP. TMR and SMR have been evaluated in a GB-scale interaction log analysis as well using data from real-world search engines. Our findings indicate that they are able to yield predictions that are better than those of competing state-of-the-art systems considering clicks only. Also, a comparison of SMR to existing solutions shows its superiority in terms of efficiency, robustness and scalability. The thesis concludes with a discussion of the potential and limitations of the above contributions and provides an overview of potential future work. / Im Laufe der vergangenen 25 Jahre haben sich Suchmaschinen zu einem der wichtigsten, wenn nicht gar dem wichtigsten Zugangspunkt zum World Wide Web (WWW) entwickelt. Diese Entwicklung resultiert vor allem aus der kontinuierlich steigenden Zahl an Dokumenten, welche im WWW verfügbar, jedoch sehr unstrukturiert organisiert sind. Überdies werden Suchergebnisse immer häufiger in Kategorien klassifiziert und in Form semantischer Informationen bereitgestellt, die direkt in der Suchmaschine konsumiert werden können. Dies spiegelt einen allgemeinen Trend wider. Durch die wachsende Zahl an Dokumenten und technologischen Neuerungen wandeln sich die Bedürfnisse von sowohl Nutzern als auch Suchmaschinen ständig. Nutzer wollen mit immer besseren Suchergebnissen und Interfaces versorgt werden, während Suchmaschinen-Unternehmen Werbung platzieren und Gewinn machen müssen, um ihre Dienste kostenlos anbieten zu können. Damit geht die Notwendigkeit einher, in hohem Maße benutzbare und optimierte Suchergebnisseiten – sogenannte SERPs (search engine results pages) – für Nutzer bereitzustellen. Gängige Methoden zur Evaluierung und Optimierung von Usability sind jedoch größtenteils kostspielig oder zeitaufwändig und basieren meist auf explizitem Feedback. Sie sind somit entweder nicht effizient oder nicht effektiv, weshalb Optimierungen an Suchmaschinen-Schnittstellen häufig primär aus dem Unternehmensblickwinkel heraus durchgeführt werden. Des Weiteren sind bestehende Methoden zur Vorhersage der Relevanz von Suchergebnissen, welche größtenteils auf der Auswertung von Klicks basieren, nicht auf neuartige SERPs zugeschnitten. Zum Beispiel versagen diese, wenn Suchanfragen direkt auf der Suchergebnisseite beantwortet werden und der Nutzer nicht klicken muss. Basierend auf den Prinzipien des nutzerzentrierten Designs entwickeln wir eine Lösung in Form eines ganzheitlichen Ansatzes für die oben beschriebenen Probleme. Dieser Ansatz orientiert sich sowohl an Nutzern als auch an Entwicklern. Unsere Lösung stellt automatische Methoden bereit, um unternehmenszentriertem Design entgegenzuwirken und implizites Nutzerfeedback für die effizienteund effektive Evaluierung und Optimierung von Usability und insbesondere Ergebnisrelevanz nutzen zu können. Wir definieren Personas und Szenarien, aus denen wir ungelöste Probleme und konkrete Anforderungen ableiten. Basierend auf diesen Anforderungen entwickeln wir einen entsprechenden Werkzeugkasten, das Search Interaction Optimization Toolkit. Mittels eines Bottom-up-Ansatzes definieren wir zudem eine gleichnamige Methodik auf einem höheren Abstraktionsniveau. Das Search Interaction Optimization Toolkit besteht aus insgesamt sechs Komponenten. Zunächst präsentieren wir INUIT [1], ein neuartiges, minimales Instrument zur Bestimmung von Usability, welches speziell auf sinnvolle Korrelationen mit implizitem Nutzerfeedback in Form Client-seitiger Interaktionen abzielt. Aus diesem Grund dient es als Basis für die direkte Herleitung quantitativer Usability-Bewertungen aus dem Verhalten von Nutzern. Das Instrument wurde basierend auf Untersuchungen etablierter Usability-Standards und -Richtlinien sowie Experteninterviews entworfen. Die Machbarkeit und Effektivität der Benutzung von INUIT wurden in einer Nutzerstudie untersucht und darüber hinaus durch eine konfirmatorische Faktorenanalyse bestätigt. Im Anschluss beschreiben wir WaPPU [2], welches ein kontextsensitives, auf INUIT basierendes Tool zur Durchführung von A/B-Tests ist. Es implementiert das neuartige Konzept des Usability-based Split Testing und ermöglicht die automatische Evaluierung der Usability beliebiger SERPs basierend auf den bereits zuvor angesprochenen quantitativen Bewertungen, welche direkt aus Nutzerinteraktionen abgeleitet werden. Hierzu werden Techniken des maschinellen Lernens angewendet, um automatisch entsprechende Usability-Modelle generieren und anwenden zu können. WaPPU ist insbesondere nicht auf die Evaluierung von Suchergebnisseiten beschränkt, sondern kann auf jede beliebige Web-Schnittstelle in Form einer Webseite angewendet werden. Darauf aufbauend beschreiben wir S.O.S., die SERP Optimization Suite [3], welche das Tool WaPPU sowie einen neuartigen Katalog von „Best Practices“ [4] umfasst. Sobald eine durch WaPPU gemessene, suboptimale Usability-Bewertung festgestellt wird, werden – basierend auf dem Katalog von „Best Practices“ – automatisch entsprechende Gegenmaßnahmen und Optimierungen für die untersuchte Suchergebnisseite vorgeschlagen. Der Katalog wurde in einem dreistufigen Prozess erarbeitet, welcher die Untersuchung bestehender Suchergebnisseiten sowie eine Anpassung und Verifikation durch 20 Usability-Experten beinhaltete. Die bisher angesprochenen Tools fokussieren auf die generelle Usability von SERPs, jedoch ist insbesondere die Darstellung der für den Nutzer relevantesten Ergebnisse eminent wichtig für eine Suchmaschine. Da Relevanz eine Untermenge von Usability ist, beinhaltet unser Werkzeugkasten daher das Tool TellMyRelevance! (TMR) [5], die erste End-to-End-Lösung zur Vorhersage von Suchergebnisrelevanz basierend auf Client-seitigen Nutzerinteraktionen. TMR ist einvollautomatischer Ansatz, welcher die benötigten Daten auf dem Client abgreift, sie auf dem Server verarbeitet und entsprechende Relevanzmodelle bereitstellt. Die von diesen Modellen getroffenen Vorhersagen können wiederum in den Ranking-Prozess der Suchmaschine eingepflegt werden, was schlussendlich zu einer Verbesserung der Usability führt. StreamMyRelevance! (SMR) [6] erweitert das Konzept von TMR, indem es einen Streaming-basierten Ansatz bereitstellt. Hierbei geschieht die Sammlung und Verarbeitung der Daten sowie die Bereitstellung der Relevanzmodelle in Nahe-Echtzeit. Basierend auf umfangreichen Nutzerstudien mit echten Suchmaschinen haben wir den entwickelten Werkzeugkasten als Ganzes evaluiert, auch, um das Zusammenspiel der einzelnen Komponenten zu demonstrieren. S.O.S., WaPPU und INUIT wurden zur Evaluierung und Optimierung einer realen Suchergebnisseite herangezogen. Die Ergebnisse zeigen, dass unsere Tools in der Lage sind, auch kleine Abweichungen in der Usability korrekt zu identifizieren. Zudem haben die von S.O.S.vorgeschlagenen Optimierungen zu einer signifikanten Verbesserung der Usability der untersuchten und überarbeiteten Suchergebnisseite geführt. TMR und SMR wurden mit Datenmengen im zweistelligen Gigabyte-Bereich evaluiert, welche von zwei realen Hotelbuchungsportalen stammen. Beide zeigen das Potential, bessere Vorhersagen zu liefern als konkurrierende Systeme, welche lediglich Klicks auf Ergebnissen betrachten. SMR zeigt gegenüber allen anderen untersuchten Systemen zudem deutliche Vorteile bei Effizienz, Robustheit und Skalierbarkeit. Die Dissertation schließt mit einer Diskussion des Potentials und der Limitierungen der erarbeiteten Forschungsbeiträge und gibt einen Überblick über potentielle weiterführende und zukünftige Forschungsarbeiten.

Page generated in 0.0625 seconds