• Refine Query
  • Source
  • Publication year
  • to
  • Language
  • 2
  • 1
  • Tagged with
  • 3
  • 3
  • 3
  • 3
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2
  • 1
  • 1
  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
1

none

Huang, Shih-ting 28 June 2007 (has links)
This paper extends respectively Gale-Shapley¡¦s model and Balinski-Sonmez¡¦s model to analyze the college admission problem and the student placement problem in the case of Taiwan. Given the assumption that time is not considered as a critical dimension of this issue, it is argued that Taiwan¡¦s admission mechanism is in accordance with the criterion of the student optimal stable mechanism with number restriction. As well, the outcome of Taiwan¡¦s admission mechanism exhibits features which are similar to that of the student optimal stable matching with number restriction. However, with regard to Taiwan¡¦s student placement mechanism, it is demonstrated that inefficiency may prevail.
2

Stable matching in preference relationships

Philpin, Elizabeth Mary 30 November 2006 (has links)
It is the aim of this paper to review some of the work done on stable matching, and on stable marriage problems in particular. Variants of the stable marriage problem will be considered, and the similarities and differences from a mathematical point of view will be highlighted. The correlation between preference and stability is a main theme, and the way in which diluted or incomplete preferences affect stability is explored. Since these problems have a wide range of practical applications, it is of interest to develop useful algorithms for the derivation of solutions. Time-complexity is a key factor in designing computable algorithms, making work load a strong consideration for practical purposes. Average and worst-case complexity are discussed. The number of different solutions that are possible for a given problem instance is surprising, and counter-intuitive. This leads naturally to a study of the solution sets and the lattice structure of solutions that emerges for any stable marriage problem. Many theorems derive from the lattice structure of stable solutions and it is shown that this can lead to the design of more efficient algorithms. The research on this topic is well established, and many theorems have been proved and published, although some published proofs have omitted the detail. In this paper, the author selects some key theorems, providing detailed proofs or alternate proofs, showing the mathematical richness of this field of study. Various applications are discussed, particularly with relevance to the social sciences, although mention is made of applications in computer science, game theory, and economics. The current research that is evident in this subject area, by reference to technical papers in periodicals and on the internet, suggests that it will remain a key topic for some time to come. / MATHEMATICAL SCIENCES / MSC (MATHEMATICS)
3

Stable matching in preference relationships

Philpin, Elizabeth Mary 30 November 2006 (has links)
It is the aim of this paper to review some of the work done on stable matching, and on stable marriage problems in particular. Variants of the stable marriage problem will be considered, and the similarities and differences from a mathematical point of view will be highlighted. The correlation between preference and stability is a main theme, and the way in which diluted or incomplete preferences affect stability is explored. Since these problems have a wide range of practical applications, it is of interest to develop useful algorithms for the derivation of solutions. Time-complexity is a key factor in designing computable algorithms, making work load a strong consideration for practical purposes. Average and worst-case complexity are discussed. The number of different solutions that are possible for a given problem instance is surprising, and counter-intuitive. This leads naturally to a study of the solution sets and the lattice structure of solutions that emerges for any stable marriage problem. Many theorems derive from the lattice structure of stable solutions and it is shown that this can lead to the design of more efficient algorithms. The research on this topic is well established, and many theorems have been proved and published, although some published proofs have omitted the detail. In this paper, the author selects some key theorems, providing detailed proofs or alternate proofs, showing the mathematical richness of this field of study. Various applications are discussed, particularly with relevance to the social sciences, although mention is made of applications in computer science, game theory, and economics. The current research that is evident in this subject area, by reference to technical papers in periodicals and on the internet, suggests that it will remain a key topic for some time to come. / MATHEMATICAL SCIENCES / MSC (MATHEMATICS)

Page generated in 0.1704 seconds