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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
1

Community engagement at CUT and its involvement in sustainable development

Munsamy, J. January 2013 (has links)
Published Article / Increasingly universities are being expected to address community engagement and sustainable development as inherent characteristics of its daily operations, as well as its academic endeavour. In many cases it necessitates a change in the approach of academics and university managers with respect to their interactions with students and academic matters. This article addresses these matters with respect to Central University of Technology, Free State (CUT). In particular the interaction between the teaching and learning, research and service provision as substantial elements of the 21st century academic enterprise is indicated and discussed.
2

Factors that Motivate YMCA Volunteers

Lubke, Theresa 01 December 1997 (has links)
The Young Men's Christian Association (YMCA) is a not-for-profit organization that depends heavily on volunteers. As one of many such organizations, the YMCA must continually strive to find the best methods of recruiting and retaining volunteers. Although the field of psychology has done considerable research on what motivates people to engage in helping behavior and Volunteerism, there has been little applied research in this area. There appeared to be a lack of applicable research that would assist YMCA staff in their recruitment and development of volunteers. This present research focused on helping to fill that gap. The purpose of this study was twofold: 1) to determine what factors initially motivate people to volunteer for a YMCA and 2) to determine what factors motivate YMCA volunteers to continue that work. With the aid of a panel of experts, a survey instrument was developed for serve as the data gathering tool. A total of 720 surveys were sent to YMCAs to distribution to volunteers over two different periods of time. The first period, November 1992, 120 surveys were sent to three YMCAs in Kentucky and Tennessee. The second period, September 1995, 600 surveys were distributed to 20 YMCAs in Ohio and Michigan. The volunteers completed a survey providing demographic data on the volunteers, the type of volunteer service they provided, and factors motivating them to volunteer. One hundred and twenty six responses were collected from volunteers representing ten of the selected YMCAs throughout the test region. The data collected from these surveys were analyzed using statistical software. The most frequent participants were males between the ages of 35 to 40 and were married with 2.3 children ranging in age from six months to 14 years. The volunteer was employed and worked 41 or more hours per week. For those respondents who had been volunteering for the YMCA for 15 or more years, the strongest motivating factor was the same as those who had volunteered for less than one year: the individual respondent liked helping people. The second most motivating factor was the same for both groups: caring and concern for others. Based on the findings of the study the researcher recommended the following: YMCA's needing volunteers should ask people to volunteer; YMCA's should emphasize that the volunteer work will help others, improve the community, and is an expression of caring and concern for others; YMCA's should design volunteer positions such that the volunteer is helping others, feels needed and is able to fulfill the position during his/her leisure time. In addition, further research needs to be conducted involving a larger volunteer sample.
3

Is a Picture Worth a Thousand Words? An Investigation into the Validity of 3D Computer Landscape Visualizations in Urban Planning

Groulx, Mark January 2010 (has links)
This study examined the use of computer visualizations in urban planning and whether they facilitate effective decision-making and communication within community engagement. The objective was to determine the potential for the human element in the visualization process to impact the public’s evaluations of a future landscape. A response equivalence experiment was performed that compared evaluations based on actual urban landscapes to those based on accurately prepared, as well as intentionally persuasive, visualizations of the same landscapes. To ensure the persuasive visualizations assessed were akin to those used in practice an investigation of procedures and professional attitudes regarding visualization use was carried out, including surveys of municipal planning departments and key-informant interviews with visualization preparers. Results from the response equivalence analysis show that a visualization preparer can positively influence preferences for an urban park or mixed use streetscape by using subtle techniques that enhance the aesthetic appearance of the virtual environment. These same techniques also have a considerable impact on aspects of landscape perception such as maintenance, safety, social inclusiveness and place identity. Findings indicate that qualitative instruments are necessary for measuring response equivalence as social aspects of landscape perception are important to the validity of simulations. Finally, it is argued that the current context of visualization use in planning practice is a threat to legitimate public engagement and the health of stakeholder relationships. A two pronged approach to effective visualization use is proposed, suggesting equal emphasis on changing professional attitudes toward the technology and creating a public with a deeper understanding of the visualization process.
4

Is a Picture Worth a Thousand Words? An Investigation into the Validity of 3D Computer Landscape Visualizations in Urban Planning

Groulx, Mark January 2010 (has links)
This study examined the use of computer visualizations in urban planning and whether they facilitate effective decision-making and communication within community engagement. The objective was to determine the potential for the human element in the visualization process to impact the public’s evaluations of a future landscape. A response equivalence experiment was performed that compared evaluations based on actual urban landscapes to those based on accurately prepared, as well as intentionally persuasive, visualizations of the same landscapes. To ensure the persuasive visualizations assessed were akin to those used in practice an investigation of procedures and professional attitudes regarding visualization use was carried out, including surveys of municipal planning departments and key-informant interviews with visualization preparers. Results from the response equivalence analysis show that a visualization preparer can positively influence preferences for an urban park or mixed use streetscape by using subtle techniques that enhance the aesthetic appearance of the virtual environment. These same techniques also have a considerable impact on aspects of landscape perception such as maintenance, safety, social inclusiveness and place identity. Findings indicate that qualitative instruments are necessary for measuring response equivalence as social aspects of landscape perception are important to the validity of simulations. Finally, it is argued that the current context of visualization use in planning practice is a threat to legitimate public engagement and the health of stakeholder relationships. A two pronged approach to effective visualization use is proposed, suggesting equal emphasis on changing professional attitudes toward the technology and creating a public with a deeper understanding of the visualization process.
5

Community engagement - South Africa : a development in community theory and education engagement. Architecture a facilitator

Nice, Jako Albert 08 January 2009 (has links)
No abstract available. C175/eo / Dissertation (MArch(Prof))--University of Pretoria, 2009. / Architecture / unrestricted
6

Participation of wards in Operation Sukuma Sakhe activities within the city of Umhlathuze

Ndlovu, Nontobeko Nontando January 2017 (has links)
A thesis submitted to the Faculty Arts in fulfilment of the requirements for the Degree of Masters of Arts in Development Studies in the Department of Anthropology and Development Studies at the University of Zululand, South Africa, 2017 / The study set out to obtain information on the nature and level of participation of community members in the implementation of Operation Sukuma Sakhe (OSS). A case study research design was adopted. A sample of 125 respondents was selected using the purposive sampling method for the key informants such as the traditional leadership, officials deployed by the government to the programme, fieldworkers and CSO. A convenience sampling method was also used for focus groups and to select participants from the community. An interview schedule which had both structured and unstructured questions, was used to gather the required data. For data analysis, the thematic analysis method was used. It was discovered that there are various methods used to engage the community in the programme, namely: mass community meetings, door-to-door visits, household visits and participation of the community as walk-ins. The most commonly used method to engage community members was found to be the door-to-door visits where the CCGs were actively involved. The respondents participated only in the identification of issues affecting them and not in identifying possible solutions to the problems. The decisions were seemingly taken by external members, something which has negative implications on community development of projects. The participation of community members in the form of ‘walk-ins’ raised concern, as this is taken as a sign of lack of commitment, which could result in people not viewing the programme as a learning process which could lead to growth and change. The method cannot be considered as a reliable or effective way of ensuring adequate participation in any service delivery or community development programme. It basically suggests low levels of participation and that the actual implementation does not encourage the development of what is referred to as the ‘we feeling’ or ownership of the programme in participation circles. It is also concluded that gender-specific capacitation and empowerment programmes have to be instituted, because the programme predominantly comprises women. The group that was found to be actively involved is usually characterised by inadequate access to assets and productive resources, and a lack of knowledge or skills. Among the officials in the WR, limited knowledge on roles and responsibilities was noted in certain wards, and this has implications for service delivery and may be somehow responsible for the lack of participation in WR activities.
7

Investigating the Spatial Relationship Between Sense of Place and Community-Based Organizations: Do Community-Based Organizations Influence Volunteering in the Indian River Lagoon, Florida?

Edmonston, Erica 01 January 2021 (has links) (PDF)
Sense of place has been used among the literature as a framework for understanding pro-environmental behavior, such as volunteering, and connections to specific areas. It is also noted that sense of place can be fostered through Community-Based Organizations However, there is limited research specific to the Indian River Lagoon (IRL), FL, on the potential influence Community-Based Organizations (CBOs) have on volunteering in the IRL. I examined secondary geographic data collected through the CNH-L: Restoration and Resilience in Coupled Human-Natural Systems: Reciprocal Dynamics of a Coastal 'Lagoon in Crisis' project funded by the National Science Foundation Grant Award Abstract No. 1617374. The sample includes 1,005 sense of place participant responses from community members, organizations, and citizen scientists of the IRL. I examined the spatial relationship between participants' interest to volunteer relative to twenty selected CBOs to determine if these interests are higher in areas with an environmental community presence (i.e., CBO) in the IRL using the Multiple Ring Buffer Analysis tool in ArcGIS Pro. Out of 1,005 total responses, 731 sense of place points, or 73% of points, were within 10-miles of CBOs in the IRL. A Two-Sample t-Test assuming Unequal Variances and Regression analysis were conducted to compare future volunteering responses, yes or no, within the 10-mile buffer radius. Results indicate that there is not a statistically significant spatial relationship between the participants' interest to volunteer relative to CBO locations. Statistically significant results from the Chi-Square Goodness-of-Fit Test comparing past and future volunteer responses suggest a relationship between past experiences and future interest. Therefore, recommendations for future studies include modifying the survey questions to investigate the participants' motivation to volunteer in addition to integrating the participant's reason for selecting the sense of place location with the analysis to further understand the participants' connection to the area.
8

The Added Value of Community Engagement in Public Design for Landscape Architecture Professionals

Proctor, Nicholaus 09 February 2017 (has links)
This thesis examines three uniquely different community engagement methods that explore the relationship between community values and the physical landscape in two Appalachian communities; Austinville, VA and St. Paul, VA. Each community engagement method is 1) introduced via literature review/case study, 2) modified from the case study to suit local conditions, and 3) analyzed for effectiveness in connecting local values and the physical landscape. I then reflected on this academic research through the lens of a three-year employment as a community development and natural asset planner with a 501(c)3 non-profit in southwest Virginia. The professional experience revealed five community systems that impacted the overall effectiveness of community engagement processes and had the potential to position communities, and their public projects, for a higher level of success. The community systems included: Capacity and Readiness, Involvement, Leadership, Communication, Frame of Reference and Community Vision. Research and professional practice together suggested that an intentional effort to understand and incorporate community values via community engagement ultimately led to more meaningful designs in the public sector. / Master of Landscape Architecture
9

Factors that Influence the Sustainability of Community Archives: A Case Study of Nova Scotia

Froese-Stoddard, Alison 30 April 2014 (has links)
Small archives are essential for understanding the historical context of social groups and geographic communities by those who live in them or study them. Using a multiple case study of eight archives serving in Nova Scotia, this study delves into the factors that influence the sustainability of these institutions and employs qualitative methodologies of expert interviews and an online questionnaire. These case studies show that sustainability can be strengthened through the support of their socio-geographic, religious, or ethno-cultural communities, strong leadership able to make strategic alliances with neighboring community institutions, and continued professional relationships with regional archival councils and national associations.
10

Design Education Reconsidered: Faculty Perceptions of Community Engagement in Landscape Architecture

Bohannon, C. L. 05 December 2014 (has links)
Colleges and universities have been linked to society since their inception. In recent times this linkage has come under scrutiny as society's expectations of higher education have become more expansive and diverse. Over the past decade, there have been various shifts in pedagogy and scholarship in higher education, including the shift towards increased civic responsibility. One such shift is the role of universities and the communities they serve. This shift toward partnership and reciprocity is termed engagement. Community engagement has emerged as an important academic strategy used to enhance and complement traditional learning methods in higher education. According to the Campus Compact, the number of faculty members who include community engagement as part of their teaching, research, and service has increased (Campus Compact, 2012). While faculty are encouraged to incorporate community engagement into their work (Colby, Ehrlich, and Stephens, 2003), nominal research focuses on the perceptions of faculty members in landscape architecture on community engagement. This research explores the current state of community engagement within landscape architecture and identifies the benefits and barriers that foster or inhibit faculty from using community engagement as part of their teaching, research, and service. This study employed a mixed methods research design. Two sequential phases were utilized. The first phase consisted of faculty responses to the Community Engagement in Landscape Architecture Education (CELAE), which consisted of 70 questions. The second phase consisted of in-depth interviews with faculty who self selected to participate in the qualitative phase of the study. Descriptive and inferential statistics were used to analyze the quantitative data, and content analysis was used to analyze the qualitative data. Findings indicate faculty members in landscape architecture believe that community engagement has a positive impact on student's educational experiences, provides opportunities for research and scholarship. Faculty also reveal how faculty in landscape architecture define community engagement in regards to other terminology that is currently used in higher education to describe working with communities to solve problems. Findings from this study may be used to help landscape architecture faculty members design and develop efforts to help promote community engagement as part of their teaching research and service. / Ph. D.

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