• Refine Query
  • Source
  • Publication year
  • to
  • Language
  • 16
  • 3
  • Tagged with
  • 22
  • 22
  • 15
  • 6
  • 4
  • 4
  • 4
  • 4
  • 3
  • 3
  • 3
  • 3
  • 3
  • 3
  • 3
  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
1

Detection of latex aeroallergens in dental schools

Mabe, Dikeledi Onnicah 25 May 2009 (has links)
Introduction: Exposure to airborne natural rubber latex proteins has become an important occupational health concern, particularly among healthcare workers. The main purpose of this study was to investigate the levels of latex aeroallergens in South African dental schools. Methods: Area (n=95) and personal (n=369) samples as well as rubber containing gloves and dental devices (n=19) were collected in 5 dental schools. The air samples were collected at a flow rate of 2.5L/min using polycarbonate (PC) filters. Latex allergens (hev b 1, hev b 3, hev b 5 and hev b 6.02) were quantified in filters and rubber extracts by a capture enzyme immunoassay. Data was analysed using STATA 9 computer software (StataCorp, 1984-2007, Texas, USA). Non parametric tests were applied as the data was skewed. The data was interpreted as ‘low’ with less than 10ng/m3; ‘moderate’ with levels between 10-50ng/m3 and ‘high’ with greater than 50ng/m3. Results: Aeroallergen concentrations varied among institutions in our study, ranging from 1.84 to 46.1ng/m3 for personal and 1.33 to 14.97ng/m3 for area samples. Hev b 6.02 was below the detection limit for 86.5% of air samples. This study also found that exposure levels differed by departments and job type. Powdered latex products showed higher allergen concentrations compared to the non-powdered products (p=0.035) and also differed significantly by the type of brands (p=0.022). Hev b 6.02 was the most prominent allergen in powdered gloves and dams. Conclusion: The air sampling method and capture enzyme immunoassay used in this study offer means for evaluation of airborne allergen concentrations. The initiative to use non-powdered low protein latex gloves and dams should be implemented as a preventive measure.
2

A review of dental admissions

Taje, Brian David, January 1994 (has links)
Thesis (M. Ed.)--University of Alberta, 1994. / eContent provider-neutral record in process. Description based on print version record. Includes bibliographical references.
3

A review of dental admissions

Taje, Brian David, January 1994 (has links)
Thesis (M. Ed.)--University of Alberta, 1994. / eContent provider-neutral record in process. Description based on print version record. Includes bibliographical references.
4

Dental hygiene entry-level program administrators' strategies for overcoming challenges of distance education

Buchanan, Bette A. January 2009 (has links)
Thesis (Ed.D.)--University of Wyoming, 2009. / Title from PDF title page (viewed on July 13, 2010). Includes bibliographical references (p. 106-126).
5

A survey of the attitudes and professional activities of dental graduates from the universities of British Columbia and Washington presently engaged in general dental practice /

Little, Robert Merl. January 1974 (has links)
Thesis--University of Washington. / Photocopy. Vita. Bibliography: leaves [116]-122.
6

The role of mentoring in the professional development and career satisfaction of dental hygiene education Administrators in the United States

Barnes, Wanda Gail, January 1999 (has links)
Thesis (Ph. D.)--Ohio State University, 1999. / Advisor: Emmalou Norland, Quantitative Research, Evaluation, and Measurement in Education. eContent provider-neutral record in process. Description based on print version record. Includes bibliographical references.
7

The role of mentoring in the professional development and career satisfaction of dental hygiene education Administrators in the United States

Barnes, Wanda Gail, January 1999 (has links)
Thesis (Ph. D.)--Ohio State University, 1999. / Advisor: Emmalou Norland, Quantitative Research, Evaluation, and Measurement in Education. Includes bibliographical references.
8

Perceptions of curriculum innovation among educators in South African dental schools - an explorative study

Gugushe, Tshepo Sipho 12 1900 (has links)
Thesis (MPhil (Curriculum Studies))--University of Stellenbosch, 2009. / Curriculum changes that have occurred in most South African dental schools have been influenced by several factors such as organizational outlook (the dental school as a learning organization), legislative frameworks that have had an influence on higher education in South Africa and epistemological interpretations of these changes by educators within dental schools. Very little is known about how medical and dental educators experience curricular change or innovations that in effect may contest their established pedagogical views. They themselves (especially those who have been teaching for many years) are products of a teacher-centred approach to learning. This, therefore, means they may have a product orientation rather than a process orientation to curriculum development. What may have been overlooked is that challenges and successes of curricular reform or revision may also be influenced by challenges to the established identity and role of teachers involved, and that some teachers’ perceptions about teaching may be in conflict with the recommended changes or innovations. The purpose of this study therefore, was to explore the influence (if any) on South African dental educators’ perceptions towards curriculum change or innovation which has occurred in the dental schools and to assess their orientation to modern pedagogic practice. The objectives of the study were twofold. Firstly to determine the South African dental educators’ perceptions and pedagogic practices to the following trends in health sciences education viz. curriculum organization, education for capability, community orientation, self-directed learning, problem-based learning, evidence-based health sciences education, communication and information technology and service learning. The second objective was to determine the influence of socio-demographic variables to the dental educators’ perceptions and pedagogic practices. Data was collected through a questionnaire which was sent to all educators at dental schools. At the time of conducting this study there were 220 educators; 168 educators responded to the questionnaire. There was a 76% response rate to the questionnaire. The data was processed utilizing responses and coding them into a computerized data set. It was coded, edited and checked using the procedures provided by the Statistical Analysis System (SAS) in order to work out the various calculations relevant to the study. The SAS FREQ procedure was used to calculate the descriptive statistics needed. The study indicated that the teacher-centred paradigm is still predominant, even though the educators claimed to be using some aspects of modern pedagogic practice. One socio-demographic variable that had a significant influence (p<0,05) on community orientation was the age of the educator. Another variable that had a significant influence on evidence-based health sciences education was number of years in academic dentistry.
9

Strategic Planning in Dental Education

Miranda, Francis L. (Francis Louis) 08 1900 (has links)
The extent of the application of the strategic planning process on dental education institutions was the problem in this descriptive study. The specific purpose was to describe the status of strategic planning based on the perceptions of the respondents. The organization, the characteristics and the impact of the strategic planning process would be investigated and described by this research. The total population of the doctoral and post-doctoral dental education institutions were included in the study. A specifically developed research instrument was used to elicit the perceptions of the respondents, both experts and chief executive officers (deans). All the experts (100 percent) completed and validated the research instrument and 65 percent of the dental education institutions completed the research instrument. The research instrument evaluated three areas of strategic planning: organization, characteristics, and the impact of strategic planning on their institutions. It was concluded that all dental education institutions participate in the strategic planning process and that the organization in the strategic planning process and that the organization and characteristics are generally similar to those in higher education institutions. The application of the strategic planning process has been proven beneficial in higher education institutions and there are perceived benefits in dental education. The study also concluded that there were conflicting perceptions that showed differences between dental and higher education institutions. These differences demonstrated that the dental education^institutions were not using the strategic planning process at the same functioning level as higher education institutions.
10

Students’ Perceptions of Blended Learning and its Effectiveness As a Part of Second Year Dental Curriculum

Varthis, Spyridon January 2016 (has links)
The field of dental medical education is one of the most rapidly evolving fields in education. Newer teaching methods are being evaluated and incorporated in dental institutions. One of the promising new methods is the blended learning approach that may involve a “flipped” instructional sequencing, where online instruction precedes the group meeting, allowing for more sophisticated learning through discussion and critical thinking. The author conducted a mixed method, experimental study that focused on second year dental students’ perceptions of blended learning and its effectiveness. A sample size of 40 dental students in their second year from a Northeastern Regional Dental School were invited to participate in this study to evaluate a blended learning approach in comparison to a more traditional lecture format. Students who participated in the study, participated in group problem-solving, responded to Likert-type surveys, completed content exams, and were interviewed individually. Based on Likert survey data and interview responses, the participants in the blended learning treatment reported very positive opinions including positive perceptions of the organization, support of meaningful learning and potential merits for use in dental education. There also was evidence that the blended learning group achieved at least as well as the traditional lecture group, and excelled on certain content test items. The results of this study support the conclusion that blended instruction promotes active, in-depth and self-regulated learning. During blended learning, students set standards or goals regarding their learning, evaluate their progress toward these goals, and then adapt and regulate their cognition, motivation, and behavior in order to accomplish their goals. Overall, the results of this research on blended learning, including the use of problem-based learning in group discussions, supports the merits of incorporating blended earning in dental education curricula.

Page generated in 0.0614 seconds