• Refine Query
  • Source
  • Publication year
  • to
  • Language
  • 1826
  • 726
  • 595
  • 290
  • 180
  • 120
  • 75
  • 58
  • 42
  • 27
  • 20
  • 18
  • 17
  • 12
  • 12
  • Tagged with
  • 5160
  • 1287
  • 908
  • 782
  • 724
  • 640
  • 573
  • 557
  • 508
  • 442
  • 409
  • 392
  • 383
  • 383
  • 379
  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
111

Maternity rolls/roles : an autoethnography on an embodied experience of pregnancy, childbirth, and disability

Kuttai, Heather Roberta 13 April 2009
As a woman with a spinal cord injury who uses a wheelchair, my thesis is an autoethnography that is based largely on the journals I have written in over the last twenty years, and in particular the journals I kept while I was pregnant and giving birth to my two children. Disability is a pervasive ideology that informs many of our cultural ideas of self and other, what constitutes acceptable and celebratory bodies, political stances, public policy, and language. Much of the literature that examines the female bodily experience excludes the stories and experiences of women with disabilities. Because the body with disabilities is often seen for what it can not do, taking on the role of mother can give the body a different value, status, and worth. I feel that my experiences as a woman with a disability experiencing pregnancy and childbirth offers insights and understanding into what it is already known about womens bodies. I display multiple levels of personal and cultural consciousness while connecting to the larger understandings of the culture of pregnancy, childbirth, and disability
112

Sport gave me something to wake up for : aboriginal adults with disabilities speak about sport

Elliott, Melanie Dawn 05 July 2007
The purpose of this exploratory and descriptive study was to understand the experience of disability from the perspective of Aboriginal adults and the meaning they give to the importance of sport in their communities. The experiences of 3 Aboriginal adults with physical disabilities were captured using the phenomenological methods of one-on-one interviews, artifact collection, and field notes. The co-participants were provided the opportunity for collaboration at each research stage, from clarifying the purpose to finalizing and interpreting the emerging themes, in an effort to demonstrate sensitivity and respect for their Aboriginal culture, beliefs, and community. The conceptual framework utilized was the minority group model, which provided a framework for interpreting the sport experiences of the co-participants. The thematic analysis and interpretation of the findings facilitated by the co-participants revealed four themes: (a) we have to get out first, (b) not being a priority, (c) pride through accomplishments, and (d) the gift to grab others. We Have to Get Out First expressed the co-participants feelings that persons with disabilities were somewhat invisible in their rural Aboriginal communities as they did not venture far from their homes. The second theme, Not Being a Priority, recognized the lack of sport opportunities for people with disabilities. However, according to the third theme, Pride through Accomplishments, for these co-participants it was their involvement in their Aboriginal community and sport that gave them a sense of self-worth and dignity. The final theme, The Gift to Grab Others, empowered them to share the richness of their experiences with other Aboriginal people with disabilities. The results reflected the need to educate and build awareness of sport opportunities for Aboriginal people with disabilities. Furthermore, the co-participants expressed the need to encourage and support people with disabilities to get out of their homes and become active, visible members of society.
113

Walking Through a Wavering With-itness: An Exploration of Disability Pride and Shame

Chandler, Eliza 10 December 2009 (has links)
This is a thesis about disability pride and shame. Here, I explore how these two characters appear in theoretical texts, personal stories and my experience of disability on the streets as an identity which connects me to others and the world as an interpretative being. This project begins by demonstrating how the popular imagination of disability pride describes the prideful person as one who relates to their embodiment with constant satisfaction. I trouble this version of pride, a version that requires one to turn away from shame, for being exclusive of disabled people who, like me, experience their disability through a wavering bodily relation. I conclude by crafting out a pride that remains with us in troubling times rather than in the abandonment of shame. This pride is accessible to us all and the never-steady stories of disability we tell.
114

Walking Through a Wavering With-itness: An Exploration of Disability Pride and Shame

Chandler, Eliza 10 December 2009 (has links)
This is a thesis about disability pride and shame. Here, I explore how these two characters appear in theoretical texts, personal stories and my experience of disability on the streets as an identity which connects me to others and the world as an interpretative being. This project begins by demonstrating how the popular imagination of disability pride describes the prideful person as one who relates to their embodiment with constant satisfaction. I trouble this version of pride, a version that requires one to turn away from shame, for being exclusive of disabled people who, like me, experience their disability through a wavering bodily relation. I conclude by crafting out a pride that remains with us in troubling times rather than in the abandonment of shame. This pride is accessible to us all and the never-steady stories of disability we tell.
115

Disabled Young People, Support and the Dialogical Work of Accomplishing Citizenship

Ignagni, Esther 09 January 2012 (has links)
Governments, human rights bodies and disability studies scholars all have suggested that disabled people’s citizenship – the legal status and lived practices that enable membership, participation and belonging in one’s community - depends on consistent, adequate and readily available home and personal supports. Yet, little theoretical or empirical work examines disabled young people’s citizenship or their use of support, particularly from their standpoints. Consequently, the ‘work’ disabled young people do to accomplish citizenship remains unrecognized, as are their unique requirements for support to do that work. Normative non-disabled citizenship assumptions remain unproblematized. This study explores what disabled young people do to accomplish citizenship, using home and personal support as the empirical foci. I used a dialogic theoretical and methodological approach, drawing on Mikhail Bakhtin and Dorothy Smith. Both posit that our talk, consciousness and actions respond to and anticipate the voices of others. Through participatory media arts techniques with disabled young people, ethnographic observation and interviews with gatekeepers to formal and informal care, I describe the work that a group of disabled young people did to secure and maintain support and how this in turn shaped their opportunities for specific citizenship practices: self-determination, community participation and social contribution. I argue that disabled young people's work to secure and maintain support requires that they mobilize the authoritative discourse of 'the poster child': a set of objectified values and views encapsulated in utterances about disabled people as futureless, deficient and deferential, originating in images to promote charitable giving. I trace three sequences of activities in which participants assimilated, resisted or brought poster child utterances into ‘dialogue’. The findings raise questions about the extent to which formal entitlements to supports influence how citizenship is lived. Drawing attention to the gaps and tensions in support provision, the findings illuminate the tremendous invisible, tacit work these participants do to strengthen fragile supports. This work, organized by philanthropic rather than rights discourses, leads to a qualified or fragile citizenship. Finally, the study raises questions about the normative and material demands that we may all experience with respect to achieving citizenship, regardless of disability or age.
116

Disabled Young People, Support and the Dialogical Work of Accomplishing Citizenship

Ignagni, Esther 09 January 2012 (has links)
Governments, human rights bodies and disability studies scholars all have suggested that disabled people’s citizenship – the legal status and lived practices that enable membership, participation and belonging in one’s community - depends on consistent, adequate and readily available home and personal supports. Yet, little theoretical or empirical work examines disabled young people’s citizenship or their use of support, particularly from their standpoints. Consequently, the ‘work’ disabled young people do to accomplish citizenship remains unrecognized, as are their unique requirements for support to do that work. Normative non-disabled citizenship assumptions remain unproblematized. This study explores what disabled young people do to accomplish citizenship, using home and personal support as the empirical foci. I used a dialogic theoretical and methodological approach, drawing on Mikhail Bakhtin and Dorothy Smith. Both posit that our talk, consciousness and actions respond to and anticipate the voices of others. Through participatory media arts techniques with disabled young people, ethnographic observation and interviews with gatekeepers to formal and informal care, I describe the work that a group of disabled young people did to secure and maintain support and how this in turn shaped their opportunities for specific citizenship practices: self-determination, community participation and social contribution. I argue that disabled young people's work to secure and maintain support requires that they mobilize the authoritative discourse of 'the poster child': a set of objectified values and views encapsulated in utterances about disabled people as futureless, deficient and deferential, originating in images to promote charitable giving. I trace three sequences of activities in which participants assimilated, resisted or brought poster child utterances into ‘dialogue’. The findings raise questions about the extent to which formal entitlements to supports influence how citizenship is lived. Drawing attention to the gaps and tensions in support provision, the findings illuminate the tremendous invisible, tacit work these participants do to strengthen fragile supports. This work, organized by philanthropic rather than rights discourses, leads to a qualified or fragile citizenship. Finally, the study raises questions about the normative and material demands that we may all experience with respect to achieving citizenship, regardless of disability or age.
117

"individual yet as one": Performing Deafness and Performing Community in Mark Medoff's Children of a Lesser God

Crilley, Mariah 15 April 2015 (has links)
In this thesis, I examine the relationship between deafness, women, and performance in Mark Medoff's Children of a Lesser God. The play was a massive popular success, both in its run on Broadway and its movie adaptation. Deafness and deaf people had never been so visible in American hearing culture. More importantly, the play coincided with civil rights movements by people with disabilities, which culminated in the passage of the Americans with Disabilities Act. Disabilities, including deafness, were called into being as part of a national identity. These movements posited self-determination but ultimately relied and thrived on a communal and relational sense of identity. I argue that the play challenges individualistic modes of identification through its protagonist, Sarah, a deaf woman whose "voice" is always translated through the audience. The play overtly and politically calls for a reconceptualization of American identity along the lines of deaf or disability and female identity theories, which typically value community and interdependence over individualism. Moreover, the genre amplifies this call for community. / McAnulty College and Graduate School of Liberal Arts; / English / MA; / Thesis;
118

Sport gave me something to wake up for : aboriginal adults with disabilities speak about sport

Elliott, Melanie Dawn 05 July 2007 (has links)
The purpose of this exploratory and descriptive study was to understand the experience of disability from the perspective of Aboriginal adults and the meaning they give to the importance of sport in their communities. The experiences of 3 Aboriginal adults with physical disabilities were captured using the phenomenological methods of one-on-one interviews, artifact collection, and field notes. The co-participants were provided the opportunity for collaboration at each research stage, from clarifying the purpose to finalizing and interpreting the emerging themes, in an effort to demonstrate sensitivity and respect for their Aboriginal culture, beliefs, and community. The conceptual framework utilized was the minority group model, which provided a framework for interpreting the sport experiences of the co-participants. The thematic analysis and interpretation of the findings facilitated by the co-participants revealed four themes: (a) we have to get out first, (b) not being a priority, (c) pride through accomplishments, and (d) the gift to grab others. We Have to Get Out First expressed the co-participants feelings that persons with disabilities were somewhat invisible in their rural Aboriginal communities as they did not venture far from their homes. The second theme, Not Being a Priority, recognized the lack of sport opportunities for people with disabilities. However, according to the third theme, Pride through Accomplishments, for these co-participants it was their involvement in their Aboriginal community and sport that gave them a sense of self-worth and dignity. The final theme, The Gift to Grab Others, empowered them to share the richness of their experiences with other Aboriginal people with disabilities. The results reflected the need to educate and build awareness of sport opportunities for Aboriginal people with disabilities. Furthermore, the co-participants expressed the need to encourage and support people with disabilities to get out of their homes and become active, visible members of society.
119

Maternity rolls/roles : an autoethnography on an embodied experience of pregnancy, childbirth, and disability

Kuttai, Heather Roberta 13 April 2009 (has links)
As a woman with a spinal cord injury who uses a wheelchair, my thesis is an autoethnography that is based largely on the journals I have written in over the last twenty years, and in particular the journals I kept while I was pregnant and giving birth to my two children. Disability is a pervasive ideology that informs many of our cultural ideas of self and other, what constitutes acceptable and celebratory bodies, political stances, public policy, and language. Much of the literature that examines the female bodily experience excludes the stories and experiences of women with disabilities. Because the body with disabilities is often seen for what it can not do, taking on the role of mother can give the body a different value, status, and worth. I feel that my experiences as a woman with a disability experiencing pregnancy and childbirth offers insights and understanding into what it is already known about womens bodies. I display multiple levels of personal and cultural consciousness while connecting to the larger understandings of the culture of pregnancy, childbirth, and disability
120

PROCESS OF PHYSICAL DISABILITY AMONG OLDER ADULTS : CONTRIBUTION OF FRAILTY IN THE SUPER-AGED SOCIETY

KUZUYA, MASAFUMI 02 1900 (has links)
No description available.

Page generated in 0.0454 seconds