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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
1

A Framework to Support the Assignment of Active Structure and Behavior in Enterprise Modeling Approaches

ARPINI, R. H. 31 August 2012 (has links)
Made available in DSpace on 2016-08-29T15:33:18Z (GMT). No. of bitstreams: 1 tese_5494_.pdf: 2904195 bytes, checksum: c6fded7753ec6bae38735ba2962dbb09 (MD5) Previous issue date: 2012-08-31 / The need to relate the various architectural domains captured in partial descriptions of an enterprise is addressed in virtually all enterprise modeling approaches. One of these domains, namely that of organizational behavior, has received significant attention in recent years in the context of business process modeling and management. Another important domain, that of organizational structure is strongly inter-related with the process domain. While the process domain focuses on how the business process activities are structured and performed, the organizational structure domain focuses on who performs these activities, i.e., which kinds of entities in an organization are capable of performing work. Given the strong connection between the organizational behavior and organizational resources, we argue that any comprehensive enterprise modeling technique should explicitly establish the relations between the modeling elements that represent organizational behavior, called here behavioral elements, and those used to represent the organizational resources (organizational actors) involved in these activities, called here active structure elements. Despite the importance of the relations between these architectural domains, many of the current enterprise architecture and business process modeling approaches lack support for the expressiveness of a number of important active structure allocation scenarios. This work aims to overcome these limitations by proposing a framework for active structure assignment that can be applied to enterprise architecture and business process modeling approaches. This framework enriches the expressiveness of existing techniques and supports the definition of precise active structure assignments. It is designed such that it should be applicable to a number of enterprise architecture and business process modeling languages, i.e., one should be able to use and apply different (enterprise and business process) modeling languages to the framework with minor changes.
2

Explaining the influence of enterprise architecture planning on information technology performance : a resource based view of the firm

Huni, Thaku 25 February 2013 (has links)
The concept of Architecture has received widespread acceptance within the construction industry. However, its importance within the Information Technology industry is a contested one. Critics of Architecture in the Information Technology (IT) industry posit that there is inadequate evidence to assume that it makes a difference to performance of IT. Enterprises increasingly need to ensure that they leverage their IT benefits not only within their silos but across business units. This need has driven ideas to introduce enterprise-wide blueprints or Enterprise Architecture (EA) Planning solutions to guide them in the design and implementation of IT. This study uses a quantitative survey to attempt to answer two questions: 1) What factors influence EA Planning within organizations? 2) To what extent does EA Planning improve IT performance? The Diffusion of Innovation theory (Compatibility, Ease of Use and Relative Advantage) was used to investigate the use of EA Planning whilst the Resource Based View of the Firm was used to investigate the performance impact of EA Planning. IT Performance is measured by Heterogeneity of Physical IT Infrastructure, Replication of IT Infrastructure Services, Business Application Integration and Enterprise Data Integration. EA Planning is measured by EA Planning Human Capital, IT Infrastructure Flexibility and Partnership Quality. Data was collected from 90 architects, some from South African consulting companies and the rest from architects around the world linked to popular Enterprise Architecture virtual communities. The key findings were significant relationships between the following for the factors that influence use of EA Planning: Compatibility and IT Infrastructure Flexibility; Ease of Use of EA Planning Policies and EA Planning Human Capital; Relative Advantage and EA Planning Partnership Quality. Significant relationships were found between the following for factors that influence IT Performance: EA Planning Human Capital and IT Performance (a combination of Enterprise Data Integration, Business Application Integration, Replication of IT Infrastructure Service and Heterogeneity of Physical IT Infrastructure); EA Planning IT Infrastructure Flexibility and Heterogeneity of Physical IT Infrastructure; EA Planning IT Infrastructure Flexibility and Business Application Integration. EA Planning Partnership Quality was rejected as a determinant of IT Performance. This study sheds light on how resistance to EA Planning can be reduced and also highlights the potential benefits of EA Planning in organizations. The implications will directly affect the relationship between EA practitioners and IT projects.
3

Representing organizational structures in enterprise architecture : an ontology-based approach

Pereira, Diorbert Corrêa 27 February 2015 (has links)
Submitted by Maykon Nascimento (maykon.albani@hotmail.com) on 2015-08-04T18:13:02Z No. of bitstreams: 2 license_rdf: 23148 bytes, checksum: 9da0b6dfac957114c6a7714714b86306 (MD5) Representing organizational structures in interprise architecture. An ontology-based approach.pdf: 3456991 bytes, checksum: 2e36c744e2b5c568d62369459629f26e (MD5) / Approved for entry into archive by Patricia Barros (patricia.barros@ufes.br) on 2015-08-14T17:28:22Z (GMT) No. of bitstreams: 2 license_rdf: 23148 bytes, checksum: 9da0b6dfac957114c6a7714714b86306 (MD5) Representing organizational structures in interprise architecture. An ontology-based approach.pdf: 3456991 bytes, checksum: 2e36c744e2b5c568d62369459629f26e (MD5) / Made available in DSpace on 2015-08-14T17:28:22Z (GMT). No. of bitstreams: 2 license_rdf: 23148 bytes, checksum: 9da0b6dfac957114c6a7714714b86306 (MD5) Representing organizational structures in interprise architecture. An ontology-based approach.pdf: 3456991 bytes, checksum: 2e36c744e2b5c568d62369459629f26e (MD5) Previous issue date: 2015 / Arquitetura Corporativa promove o estabelecimento de uma visão holística da estrutura e forma de trabalho de uma organização. Um dos aspectos abordados em Arquitetura Corporativa está associada a "estrutura ativa" da organização, que diz respeito a “quem" realiza as atividades organizacionais. Várias abordagens têm sido propostas a fim de proporcionar um meio para a representação de Arquitetura Corporativa, entre as quais ARIS, RM-ODP, UPDM e ArchiMate. Apesar da aceitação por parte da comunidade, as abordagens existentes se concentram em propósitos diferentes, têm limitações de escopo e algumas não têm semântica de mundo real bem definida. Além das abordagens de modelagem, muitas abordagens de ontologias têm sido propostas, a fim de descrever o domínio de estrutura ativa, incluindo as ontologias de SUPER Project, TOVE, Enterprise Ontology e W3C Org Ontology. Embora especificadas para fundamentação semântica e negociação de significado, algumas das abordagens propostas têm fins específicos e cobertura limitada. Além disso, algumas das abordagens não são definidas usando linguagens formais e outras são especificadas usando linguagens sem semântica bem definida. Este trabalho apresenta uma ontologia de referência bem fundamentada para o domínio organizacional. A ontologia organizacional de referência apresentada abrange os aspectos básicos discutidos na literatura organizacional, tais como divisão do trabalho, relações sociais e classificação das unidades estruturais. Além disso, também abrange os aspectos organizacionais definidos em abordagens existentes, levando em consideração tanto abordagens de modelagem quanto abordagens ontológicas. A ontologia resultante é especificada em OntoUML e estende os conceitos sociais de UFO-C. / Enterprise Architecture (EA) promotes the establishment of a holistic view of the structure and way of working of an organization. One of the aspects covered in EA is associated with the organization’s “active structure”, which concerns “who” undertakes organizational activities. Several approaches have been proposed in order to provide a means for representing enterprise architecture, among which ARIS, RM-ODP, UPDM and ArchiMate. Despite the acceptance by the community, existing approaches focus on different purposes, have limitations on their conceptual scopes and some have no real world semantics well-defined. Besides modeling approaches, many ontology approaches have been proposed in order to describe the active structure domain, including the ontologies in the SUPER Project, TOVE, Enterprise Ontology and W3C Org Ontology. Although specified for semantic grounding and meaning negotiation, some of proposed approaches have specific purposes and limited coverage. In addition, some of them are not defined using formal languages and others are specified using languages without welldefined semantics. This work presents a well-founded reference ontology for the organizational domain. The organizational reference ontology presented covers the basic aspects discussed in the organizational representation literature, such as division of labor, social relations and classification of structuring units. Further, it also encompasses the organizational aspects defined in existing approaches, both modeling and ontology approaches. The resulting ontology is specified in OntoUML and extends the social concepts of UFO-C.
4

IT Consumerization & Enterprise Architecture: An Exploratory Case Study

Zhou, Eric January 2017 (has links)
IT Consumerization is the phenomenon of consumer-originated and consumer-oriented technologies entering organizations and their corresponding organizational impacts, risks, and opportunities. IT Consumerization has fundamentally changed the way organizations respond to the technology needs of business users as well as the corresponding governance, management, and operational maintenance of information technology. Enterprise Architecture (EA), a practice and body of knowledge that views organizations and enterprises through architectural layers, has been posited as an effective tool in supporting the needs of IT Consumerization. This thesis addresses the question of what roles EA can play in the context of IT Consumerization as well as the general effectiveness and comprehensiveness of current EA frameworks in addressing IT Consumerization needs. Using a single case study design, this research study applied directed content analysis and a deductive thematic analysis approach to answer these questions. The initial set of codes and themes were derived from sensitizing concepts within The Open Group Architectural Framework (TOGAF). Findings from this research suggest that IT Consumerization is a complex domain characterized with unpredictability, unknown decision variables, and no single correct answer in the context of problem solving and decision making. Our research suggests that in order for an EA practice to help in IT Consumerization initiatives, organizations must ensure that EA practices are not limited to technical problem solving, and that they have the resources and skills required for business problem solving. While EA has often been positioned as an information technology function within many organizations, we argue that based on our findings, EA’s role within organizations can go beyond this traditionally technical focus, to include both advisory and strategic roles leveraging business skillsets to solve business problems. Our EA role framework is a significant departure from the widespread belief that EA practices start at the translation of business strategy to technology strategy, by proposing that EA can play a valuable role earlier in strategic processes such as business strategy development, direction setting, and change prioritization. This inquiry highlights some of the key interrelationships between EA and IT Consumerization.
5

Study on Architecture-Oriented Manufacturing Management Model

Liu, Chih-cheng 03 January 2011 (has links)
As the external environment changing continuously, strict control of production, urgent demand, information of manufacturing management need to immediately, transparently, and digitally respond to the market and improve the quality of decision. Therefore, manufacturing execution systems (MES) are chosen to replace shop floor control systems (SFCs) by enterprises. For a long time being, the small and medium-sized enterprises contribute a great deal to Taiwan¡¦s economy. After the global trend of information technology and the rapid development of internet, many chief executive officers realized the important role of information technology played within an enterprise. Can the information system fit seamlessly into the business management? Since there is short of an integrated tool to communicate effectively, most projects of information systems channel into time delay and fail to obtain applause. Still, most companies adopt the process-oriented approach, which is not an integrated tool, to model the manufacturing management. This study, concluding that there is a better choice, selects TOGAF enterprise architecture (EA) Method (ArchiMate) to model the manufacturing management. Through architectural thinking and analysis, ArchiMate tool is able to integrate the organizational structure and organizational behavior, thus improve the communication efficiency and decision quality within an enterprise.
6

Study on Architecture-Oriented Government Procurement Management Model

Hsueh, Yu-Hsiang 11 June 2012 (has links)
The Public Construction Commission was established on July 20, 1995. In order that government departments have a rule to follow, the Government Procurement Act is promulgated by presidential decree on May 27, 1998. Furthermore, its spirit was established on the Chapter I- General Principle, the Article one ¡§This Act is enacted to establish a government procurement system that has fair and open procurement procedures, promotes the efficiency and effectiveness of government procurement operation, and ensures the quality of procurement.¡¨ There are more than 40 seed laws and 10 types of operating regulations enacted by the administration, the Public Construction Commission, since the implementation of the Government Procurement Law. Hence, the Government Procurement Act tends to be more complete. However, the act is not only applied to the public departments, but also applicable to other organizations, such as public schools. It can be observable from the Act 3 ¡§Procurement conducted by any government agency, public school or government-owned enterprise (hereinafter referred to as the "entity") shall be governed by the provisions of this Act. With regard to the matters not provided for in this Act, other relevant laws shall govern.¡¨; Act4 ¡§A juridical person or organization which takes a grant from an entity shall conduct a procurement in accordance with this Act and be under supervision by the entity provided that the amount of the grant is not less than half of the procurement value and also reaches the threshold for publication.¡¨ and Act 5 ¡§An entity may entrust a juridical person or organization to conduct its procurement.¡¨ From the above, it is obvious that they should abide by the Government Procurement Act, and the purchasing behavior of organization, which takes the financial subsidy over 50% from government, also should obey the act. Therefore, regardless of whether a formal civil servant, as long as the purchasing behaviors are relevant to the government procurement, the contractor personnel must to follow the Government Procurement Law. In this study, the architecture-oriented government procurement management model (AOGPMM) is constructed which is based on six fundamental diagrams of the structure-behavior coalescence (SBC) architecture. AOGPMM represents multiple views of procurement management by integrating the structure and behavior of government procurement. So, the purchasing officers can effectively understand the whole picture of government procurement through AOGPMM. Keywords: Enterprise Architecture, Government Procurement, AOGPMM
7

Study of A Structure-Process-Integrated Enterprise Architecture

Yang, Jen-Way 12 January 2006 (has links)
In recent years, the concept of Enterprise Architecture with business organization, management, and operation have called lots of attention. The construction of Enterprise Architecture is art. It needs not only the concrete structure but integrated with the operational process. The enterprise must emphasize architecture planning and management more than technique application or goods production. Therefore, we need to analyze the organization and process of an enterprise to establish a detail and unique strategy while building up an enterprise architecture. To use the concept of structure-process-integrated, enterprise architecture will optimize and improve business operations and flexibility. The most popular models of enterprise architecture always have bias. Either it emphasizes functional business structures or information system platforms. Note that business structure is applied to support operations. A company will fail without the support of business structure. It will bring great advantage to a company to adopt the concept of a structure-process-integrated enterprise architecture to maximize operations and communications of a company. This study is to review and analyze the current theories of enterprise architecture and explore the factors to ensure successes of an enterprise. It also mentions how to establish an integrated architecture through interaction of all factors besides the necessary of individual factor. We strongly think this study contributes a great deal to the current enterprise architecture research.
8

The architecture of information in organisations

Iyamu, T 11 July 2011 (has links)
Over the last two decades competition amongst organisations including financial institutions has increased tremendously. The value of information is critical to competition in different organisations. In addition, the management of cost of delivery and cohesiveness of information flow and use in the organisations continue a challenge to information technology (IT). In an attempt to address these challenges, many organisations sought various solutions, including enterprise information architecture (EIA). The EIA is intended to address the needs of the organisation for competitive advantage. This research article focused on the role of principles in the development and implementation of EIA. The article aimed to investigate how EIA could be best leveraged, exploited, or otherwise used to provide business value. The research brings about a fresh perspective and new methodological principles required in architecting the enterprise information.
9

Towards a framework for managing enterprise architecture acceptance / Sonja Gilliland

Gilliland, Sonja January 2014 (has links)
An enterprise is a complex and changing entity, which is managed and maintained by humans. Enterprise architecture has been identified as an organisational strategy designed to assist enterprises with the understanding of complexity and the management of change. Acceptance, implementation and maintenance of enterprise architecture in organisations are complex and time-consuming. Work roles, responsibilities, common vocabulary, and buy-in are some of the cooperative human factors of stakeholders and participants and are believed to have an effect on the process of enterprise architecture acceptance in organisations. This study focused on identifying human factors affecting enterprise architecture acceptance and the question of how knowledge of these human factors can be used to assist organisations in the management of enterprise architecture acceptance. The research addressed two main research objectives: the development of a work-level-related model for enterprise architecture acceptance and a proposed method for assisting organisations with enterprise architecture acceptance. An initial set of human factors affecting enterprise architecture acceptance were identified through an exploratory study in one organisation. A study of existing literature was used to identify other human factors affecting enterprise architecture acceptance and to compile a more comprehensive list of human factors. The resulting comprehensive list of human factors was categorised into six constructed work-level-related human concerns and confirmed in more organisations. A work-level-related model for enterprise architecture acceptance was established based on the work-level-related human concerns and associated human factors. A method for organisational use and management of enterprise architecture acceptance based on the model was proposed. The result of the research is the Work-level acceptance framework for enterprise architecture (WoLAF for EA), which could contribute to understanding and managing the important aspect of human acceptance of enterprise architecture in organisations. / PhD (Information Technology)--North-West University, Vaal Triangle Campus, 2015
10

Towards a framework for managing enterprise architecture acceptance / Sonja Gilliland

Gilliland, Sonja January 2014 (has links)
An enterprise is a complex and changing entity, which is managed and maintained by humans. Enterprise architecture has been identified as an organisational strategy designed to assist enterprises with the understanding of complexity and the management of change. Acceptance, implementation and maintenance of enterprise architecture in organisations are complex and time-consuming. Work roles, responsibilities, common vocabulary, and buy-in are some of the cooperative human factors of stakeholders and participants and are believed to have an effect on the process of enterprise architecture acceptance in organisations. This study focused on identifying human factors affecting enterprise architecture acceptance and the question of how knowledge of these human factors can be used to assist organisations in the management of enterprise architecture acceptance. The research addressed two main research objectives: the development of a work-level-related model for enterprise architecture acceptance and a proposed method for assisting organisations with enterprise architecture acceptance. An initial set of human factors affecting enterprise architecture acceptance were identified through an exploratory study in one organisation. A study of existing literature was used to identify other human factors affecting enterprise architecture acceptance and to compile a more comprehensive list of human factors. The resulting comprehensive list of human factors was categorised into six constructed work-level-related human concerns and confirmed in more organisations. A work-level-related model for enterprise architecture acceptance was established based on the work-level-related human concerns and associated human factors. A method for organisational use and management of enterprise architecture acceptance based on the model was proposed. The result of the research is the Work-level acceptance framework for enterprise architecture (WoLAF for EA), which could contribute to understanding and managing the important aspect of human acceptance of enterprise architecture in organisations. / PhD (Information Technology)--North-West University, Vaal Triangle Campus, 2015

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