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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
1

Nuo : shamanism among the Tujia of southwestern China

Li, Lan January 1998 (has links)
No description available.
2

Once were Japanese: a study of the elder native Taiwanese

Zhou, Fang, 周芳 January 2008 (has links)
published_or_final_version / Japanese Studies / Master / Master of Philosophy
3

The evolution of Ulster Unionism 1960-9 : causes and consequences

Mulholland, Marc January 1997 (has links)
No description available.
4

Presenting unity, performing diversity: Sto:lo identity negotiations in venues of cultural representation

Hiwasaki, Lisa 11 1900 (has links)
In the process of negotiating land claims, First Nations in British Columbia and Canada face the challenging task of presenting a unified identity without trampling on the inevitable diversity within their communities. This thesis explores the perceived conflict between unity and diversity amongst Native populations. It brings together fieldwork in St6:l o territory in the Fraser Valley of British Columbia, performance theory, and contemporary discourse surrounding identity production at this particular point in time. The work examines performance of identity as a form of social action and the variability of identity performances. Data was gathered from interviews with people involved with two sites where educational programmes are being developed for local students: Xa:ytem Longhouse Interpretive Centre at Hatzic Rock, near Mission, and Longhouse Extension Programme/ Shxwt'a:selhawtxw on St6:l o Nation grounds in Chilliwack. The theme explored in this thesis is that just as unity is politically expedient, diversity and its management is an important facet of the performance of identity.
5

A ware Afrikaner : an examination of the role of Eugene Marais (1871-1936) in the making of Afrikaner identity

Swart, Sandra Scott January 2001 (has links)
This thesis investigates the creation of Afrikaner identity, more particularly the role of an individual in the shaping of public consciousness, in order to help comprehend how 'Afrikaner' identity was propagated. The focus is on Eugene Marais's career from 1890 to 1936, a period in which the Afrikaner language was standardised and changing socio-economic forces produced the conditions under which class and regional fragmentation yielded to pan-South African Afrikaner identity. This thesis does not retell the story of Marais's life. Neither does it give an overview of the rise of Afrikaner nationalism. Instead, it lies between these two poles. Marais represents two important foci of research: those who assisted in the self-conscious construction of Afhkanerdom and those who came to be seen as ware Afrikaners (true Afrikaners) and volkshelde (heroes of the people). This thesis tells a story woven from two contrapuntal narratives. The first speaks of an individual's life and work, the second, of a wider context of culture-brokers and the process of creating ethnic consciousness. The initial two chapters trace the workings of Afrikaner identity from the pre-South African War interaction between politics and those coming increasingly to define themselves as Afrikaners, to the interplay of ethnicity and language within the divided cultural elite. The discussion then turns to the use of popular science by this elite, in the making and propagation of an Afrikaner identity. The following two chapters consider the interaction of the Afrikaner with other groups, exploring cultural osmosis between ethnic communities and the image of another race in Afrikaans literature. Finally, the myth-making of the Afrikaner, particularly the creation of a volksheld, is considered, to examine the interplay of ethnicity, politics and memory.
6

Gibraltar, identity and imperialism : a study of an evolving Gibraltarian community

Archer, Edward Gilbert January 2002 (has links)
This study provides an account of the influences which have contributed to the creation of a Gibraltarian sense of identity, with particular reference to the British imperial presence. Primary sources are of considerable importance, especially when no previous studies are available as in the case of key aspects of the history of education and informal cultural influences. Much use is made of oral evidence. Secondary sources are also used extensively. The prologue sets the scene, establishes the structure and outlines the methodology, while chapter one explores the changing contexts and values which form the background to the study. An account of geographical, environmental and ethnic factors follows, outlining how British interests have played their part. Economic and political factors are then reviewed and they indicate both past and present dependence on the British and a substantial legacy of British ideas and practices. In the case of religion and language both British and non -British influences are shown to have been at work. The Anglican and other non-conformist churches have been vehicles for British influence while Roman Catholicism, with its direct link to Rome, has been the religion of the people. As regards language, the British imposed English as the prestigious language, in direct competition with the language of the area, Spanish. Thus, Gibraltarians have become bilingual but, as is demonstrated, with their own linguistic idiosyncrasies. The study goes on to show that the formal educational system, first religious later largely secular, has been among the most powerful formative factors. The colonial government began to take charge after 1945, prior to a Gibraltaradministered system being put in place. Practice has followed and continues to follow English examples closely and higher education has come to rely entirely on provision in the United Kingdom. Informal influences, through a wide range of social, sporting and cultural activities, have also been of very great importance. Equally, they have reflected British ideas and values. They are given due weight in the last two chapters. In particular, they have furthered the development of Gibraltar's class structure while reinforcing a Gibraltarian sense of identity. The epilogue draws the overall conclusion that the Gibraltarian people and the Gibraltarian community, while separate and unique, are largely the product of the British colonial presence on The Rock. Gibraltar is very much an "offspring of empire". The present strong allegiance of Gibraltarians to Britain makes this clear.
7

Khmer-Americans : the shaping of a diasporic identity through traumatic memory

Koo, Ryan Jonathan January 2007 (has links)
Thesis (M.A.)--University of Hawaii at Manoa, 2007. / Includes bibliographical references (leaves 154-159). / v, 159 leaves, bound 29 cm
8

Lorsque la mère immigrée et sa fille font leurs achats ensemble : interactions et construction de l'identité ethnique dans la dyade / When the immigrant mother and her daughter shop together : interactions and construction of ethnic identity in the dyad

Regany, Fatima 29 November 2012 (has links)
Lorsque la mère immigrée et sa fille font leurs achats ensemble : interactions et construction de l'identité ethnique dans la dyade / When the immigrant mother and her daughter shop together : interactions and construction of ethnic identity in the dyad
9

Presenting unity, performing diversity: Sto:lo identity negotiations in venues of cultural representation

Hiwasaki, Lisa 11 1900 (has links)
In the process of negotiating land claims, First Nations in British Columbia and Canada face the challenging task of presenting a unified identity without trampling on the inevitable diversity within their communities. This thesis explores the perceived conflict between unity and diversity amongst Native populations. It brings together fieldwork in St6:l o territory in the Fraser Valley of British Columbia, performance theory, and contemporary discourse surrounding identity production at this particular point in time. The work examines performance of identity as a form of social action and the variability of identity performances. Data was gathered from interviews with people involved with two sites where educational programmes are being developed for local students: Xa:ytem Longhouse Interpretive Centre at Hatzic Rock, near Mission, and Longhouse Extension Programme/ Shxwt'a:selhawtxw on St6:l o Nation grounds in Chilliwack. The theme explored in this thesis is that just as unity is politically expedient, diversity and its management is an important facet of the performance of identity. / Arts, Faculty of / Anthropology, Department of / Graduate
10

Khoisan ancestry and coloured identity: A study of the korana royal house under chief Josiah Kats

Gabie, Sharon 26 February 2014 (has links)
The advent of democracy in South Africa in 1994 coincided with International Legislation where the International Labour Organisation ILO Convention 1969 – Indigenous & Tribal Peoples Convention, 1989 was prominent in their ‘rights to roots’ campaign, closely followed by the 1994 United Nations Draft - Universal Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples. These international debates filtered through to local communities in South Africa, who was still in the infant stages of democracy. The newly installed government glanced off ethnic loyalty in favour of the spirit of nationalism as the building blocks to unity in the new State. Under leadership of the African National Congress (ANC), resurgent voices of Khoisan revivalist groups appeared to reassert an identity linked to particularity. This was done in the wake of a colonial and apartheid past, where these institutions destabilised identities hence the formation and mobilization of new political structures amongst neo-Khoisan Revivalist groups. Many of these neo-Khoisan groups are spearheaded by self-appointed leaders to mobilize support on the basis of ethnic loyalty to foster notions of ‘belonging’ to an ethnic society and the scramble for resources. This thesis looked at the contemporary view of those who are in the process of identity reclamation. It has done so by using the Korana Royal House as a vignette to look at the broader Khoisan movement. The thesis looked at the evolution of naming rules and customs and how these interrelate in different contexts and the international discourse about concepts like indigenous and traditional groups.

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