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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
41

A refinement calculus for nondeterministic expressions

Ward, Nigel Thomas Edgar Unknown Date (has links)
No description available.
42

Theoretical Foundations for Practical ‘Totally Functional Programming’

Colin Kemp Unknown Date (has links)
Interpretation is an implicit part of today’s programming; it has great power but is overused and has significant costs. For example, interpreters are typically significantly hard to understand and hard to reason about. The methodology of “Totally Functional Programming” (TFP) is a reasoned attempt to redress the problem of interpretation. It incorporates an awareness of the undesirability of interpretation with observations that definitions and a certain style of programming appear to offer alternatives to it. Application of TFP is expected to lead to a number of significant outcomes, theoretical as well as practical. Primary among these are novel programming languages to lessen or eliminate the use of interpretation in programming, leading to better-quality software. However, TFP contains a number of lacunae in its current formulation, which hinder development of these outcomes. Among others, formal semantics and type-systems for TFP languages are yet to be discovered, the means to reduce interpretation in programs is to be determined, and a detailed explication is needed of interpretation, definition, and the differences between the two. Most important of all however is the need to develop a complete understanding of the nature of interpretation. In this work, suitable type-systems for TFP languages are identified, and guidance given regarding the construction of appropriate formal semantics. Techniques, based around the ‘fold’ operator, are identified and developed for modifying programs so as to reduce the amount of interpretation they contain. Interpretation as a means of language-extension is also investigated. Finally, the nature of interpretation is considered. Numerous hypotheses relating to it considered in detail. Combining the results of those analyses with discoveries from elsewhere in this work leads to the proposal that interpretation is not, in fact, symbol-based computation, but is in fact something more fundamental: computation that varies with input. We discuss in detail various implications of this characterisation, including its practical application. An often more-useful property, ‘inherent interpretiveness’, is also motivated and discussed in depth. Overall, our inquiries act to give conceptual and theoretical foundations for practical TFP.
43

Theoretical Foundations for Practical ‘Totally Functional Programming’

Colin Kemp Unknown Date (has links)
Interpretation is an implicit part of today’s programming; it has great power but is overused and has significant costs. For example, interpreters are typically significantly hard to understand and hard to reason about. The methodology of “Totally Functional Programming” (TFP) is a reasoned attempt to redress the problem of interpretation. It incorporates an awareness of the undesirability of interpretation with observations that definitions and a certain style of programming appear to offer alternatives to it. Application of TFP is expected to lead to a number of significant outcomes, theoretical as well as practical. Primary among these are novel programming languages to lessen or eliminate the use of interpretation in programming, leading to better-quality software. However, TFP contains a number of lacunae in its current formulation, which hinder development of these outcomes. Among others, formal semantics and type-systems for TFP languages are yet to be discovered, the means to reduce interpretation in programs is to be determined, and a detailed explication is needed of interpretation, definition, and the differences between the two. Most important of all however is the need to develop a complete understanding of the nature of interpretation. In this work, suitable type-systems for TFP languages are identified, and guidance given regarding the construction of appropriate formal semantics. Techniques, based around the ‘fold’ operator, are identified and developed for modifying programs so as to reduce the amount of interpretation they contain. Interpretation as a means of language-extension is also investigated. Finally, the nature of interpretation is considered. Numerous hypotheses relating to it considered in detail. Combining the results of those analyses with discoveries from elsewhere in this work leads to the proposal that interpretation is not, in fact, symbol-based computation, but is in fact something more fundamental: computation that varies with input. We discuss in detail various implications of this characterisation, including its practical application. An often more-useful property, ‘inherent interpretiveness’, is also motivated and discussed in depth. Overall, our inquiries act to give conceptual and theoretical foundations for practical TFP.
44

Simulation and performance evaluation of a graph reduction machine architecture

Sarangi, Ananda G. 07 1900 (has links) (PDF)
M.S. / Computer Science & Engineering / The Graph Reduction Machine (G-Machine) is an architecture intended to achieve high performance in executing functional language programs. The success or failure of this novel architecture can only be determined by its performance in executing "real" programs. The simulator of the G-Machine, described in this thesis, makes possible detailed studies of the performance of the G-Machine architecture even though the hardware implementation of a G-Machine is not complete.
45

Generalized algebraic datatypes a different approach /

Le Normand, Jacques. January 1900 (has links)
Thesis (M.Sc.). / Written for the Dept. of Computer Science. Title from title page of PDF (viewed 2007/08/30). Includes bibliographical references.
46

Algebraic specification and verification of processor microarchitectures /

Matthews, John Robert, January 2000 (has links)
Thesis (Ph. D.)--Oregon Graduate Institute, 2000.
47

Space cost analysis using sized types /

Vasconcelos, Pedro Baltazar. January 2008 (has links)
Thesis (Ph.D.) - University of St Andrews, October 2008.
48

Nízkoúrovňový funkcionální programovací jazyk / Nízkoúrovňový funkcionální programovací jazyk

Kratochvíl, Miroslav January 2015 (has links)
The goal of this thesis is to explore the current possibilities of implementation of compilers of low-level functional languages. It is expected to evaluate theoretical possibilities of functional programming languages, possible limitations that arise from the absence of run-time code support in low-level environment, and to implement a language compiler that demonstrates some chosen properties. Powered by TCPDF (www.tcpdf.org)
49

Typované funkcionání genetické programování / Typed Functional Genetic Programming

Křen, Tomáš January 2013 (has links)
In this thesis is presented design and implementation of a system performing genetic programming in simply typed lambda calculus. Population initialization method based on term generating technique producing typed lambda terms in long normal form is introduced. This method is parameterized by simple search strategy. Several search strategies are presented, such as strategy for systematic generation or strategy corresponding to standard ramped half-and-half method. Another such a strategies called \textit{geometric} strategy is further examined in experiments and shown to have various desirable effects such as improved success rate, lesser time consumption and smaller average term size in comparison with standard ramped half-and-half generating method. Other performance enhancements are proposed and supported by experiments such as eta-normalization of generated individuals and @-tree representation of individuals. Abstraction elimination is utilized to enable use of simple tree- swapping crossover. Powered by TCPDF (www.tcpdf.org)
50

Elmulating JavaScript

Eriksson, Nils, Ärleryd, Christofer January 2016 (has links)
Functional programming has long been used in academia, but has historically seen little light in industry, where imperative programming languages have been dominating. This is quickly changing in web development, where the functional paradigm is increasingly being adopted. While programming languages on other platforms than the web are constantly competing, in a sort of survival of the fittest environment, on the web the platform is determined by the browsers which today only support JavaScript. JavaScript which was made in 10 days is not well suited for building large applications. A popular approach to cope with this is to write the application in another language and then compile the code to JavaScript. Today this is possible to do in a number of established languages such as Java, Clojure, Ruby etc. but also a number of special purpose language has been created These are languages that are made for building front-end web applications. One such language is Elm which embraces the principles of functional programming. In many real life situation Elm might not be possible to use, so in this report we are going to look at how to bring the benefits seen in Elm to JavaScript.

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