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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
1

A fundamental study of hydroelasticity theory

Miao, Shi-Hua January 1995 (has links)
No description available.
2

Hydroelastic analyses of non-beamlike ships in waves

Wu, Yongshu January 1990 (has links)
No description available.
3

On the rheology of dense pastes of soft particles

Seth, Jyoti Ravishanker, January 1900 (has links)
Thesis (Ph. D.)--University of Texas at Austin, 2008. / Vita. Includes bibliographical references.
4

Elastohydrodynamic simulator

Bakman, Aleksandr Israel 05 1900 (has links)
No description available.
5

An interfacing strategy for fluid-structure interaction with application to linear hydroelasticity

Huang, Linlin. January 2004 (has links)
Thesis (Ph. D.)--University of Hawaii at Manoa, 2004. / Includes bibliographical references (leaves 145-149).
6

Hydroelasticity of High-Speed Planing Craft Subject to Slamming Events: An Experimental and Numerical Investigation of Wedge Water Entry

Ren, Zhongshu 27 August 2020 (has links)
High-speed planing craft operating in waves are subject to frequent water impact, or slamming, as a portion or whole of the craft exits the water and re-enters at high velocity. The global load induced by slamming can cause fatigue-related damages to structures. The local slamming can cause local damage to structures and its induced acceleration can cause damage to equipment and personnel aboard. Therefore the slamming loads in high-speed craft are critical design loads. Nowadays, due to the increasing use of composite materials in high-speed craft, the interaction between the hydrodynamic loading and structural response, or hydroelasticity, must be considered. In this work, a flexible V-shaped wedge, which vertically enters the calm water with an impact velocity, was examined experimentally and numerically to characterize the slamming of a representative cross-section of high-speed craft. Physical quantities of interest include rigid-body kinematic motions, spray root propagation, hydrodynamic loading, and structural response. In the experimental work, with varied impact velocity and flexural rigidity of the wedge bottom plate, a wide range of hydroelasticity factors were investigated. The intersection between the bottom plate and side plate is called chine. The phases before and after the spray root reached the chine are called chine-unwetted and chine-wetted phase, respectively. It was found that the maximum deflection and strain occur in the chine-unwetted phase while a structural vibration with rapidly decaying magnitude is observed in the chine-wetted phase. Furthermore, the kinematic effect of hydroelasticity changes the spray root propagation and hence the pressure, while the inertial effect elongates the natural period of the plate. Inspired by the experimental work, a computational framework was proposed to focus on the chine-unwetted phase. Several hydroelastic models can be obtained from this framework. The hydroelastic models were validated to show reasonable agreement with experiments. Various parameters were studied through the computational framework. The hydroelasticity factor was modified to account for the mass and boundary conditions. It was found that the nondimensional rigid-body kinematic motions and maximum deflection showed little dependence on the hydroelasticity factor. Hydroelastic effects increased the time it takes for the peak maximum deflection to be reached for small values of the hydroelasticity factor. Hydroelastic effects also have little influence on the magnitude of the maximum deflection. These discoveries further the understanding of hydroelastic slamming and show the potential to guide the structural optimization and design of high-speed craft. / Doctor of Philosophy / High-speed planing craft operating in waves are prone to frequent water impact, or slamming, as a portion or whole of the craft exits the water and re-enters at high velocity. The slamming loads in high-speed craft are critical design loads as the slamming can cause damage to the structures and equipment as well as injure personnel aboard. Nowadays, due to the increasing use of composite materials in high-speed craft, the interaction between the hydrodynamic loading and structural response, or hydroelasticity, must be considered. In this work, a flexible V-shaped wedge entering water is studied experimentally and computationally to characterize the slamming of a representative cross-section of high-speed craft. The contact point between the water surface and the wedge bottom is called the spray root. It was found that the hydrodynamic loading and structural response interact with each other through the spray root. The maximum deflection and strain occur when the wedge bottom is partially submerged while a structural vibration with rapidly decaying magnitude is observed when the wedge bottom is fully submerged. Using the hydroelasticity factor proposed by other researchers, the extent of fluid-structure interaction was quantified. Hydroelastic effects manifest themselves when the hydroelasticity factor is small These discoveries further the understanding of hydroelastic slamming and show the potential to guide the structural optimization and design of high-speed craft.
7

On the role of aeration, elasticity and wave-structure interaction on hydrodynamic impact loading

Mai, Trí Cao January 2017 (has links)
Local and global loadings, which may cause the local damage and/or global failure and collapse of offshore structures and ships, are experimentally investigated in this study. The big research question is how the aeration of water and the elasticity of the structural section affect loading during severe environmental conditions. A further question is how the scattered waves from ships and offshore structures, the mooring line force and the structural response, which are known to affect local load and contribute to global load, will be affected by wave-structure interaction of a ship or offshore structure under non-breaking wave conditions. Three different experiments were undertaken in this study to try to answer these questions: (i) slamming impacts of a square flat rigid/elastic plate, which represents a plate section of the bottom or bow of ship structure, onto pure and aerated water surface with zero degree deadrise angle; (ii) wave impacts on a truncated vertical rigid/elastic wall in pure and aerated water, where the wall represents a plate section of a hull; and (iii) wave-structure interactions of different FPSO-shaped models, where the models were fixed or taut moored. The experiments were carried out at Plymouth University’s COAST Laboratory. Spatial impact pressure distributions on the square plate have been characterised under different impact velocities. It was found that the impact pressures and force in pure water were proportional to the square of impact velocity. There was a significant reduction in both the maximum impact pressure and force for slamming in aerated water compared to that in pure water. An exponential relationship of the maximum force and the void fraction is proposed and its coefficients are found from drop test in this study. There was also a significant reduction in the first phase of the pressure and force impulse for slamming into aerated water compared with pure water. On the truncated wall, aeration also significantly reduced peak wave loads (both pressure and force) but impulses were not reduced by very much. For the case considered here, elasticity of the impact plate has a significant effect on the impact loads, though only at high impact velocities; here the impact loads were considerably reduced with increasing elasticity. Wave loading on the truncated wall was found to reduce with increasing elasticity of the wall for all investigated breaking wave types: high aeration, flip-through and slightly breaking wave impacts. In particular, impact pressure decreases with increasing elasticity of the wall under flip-through wave impact. As elasticity increases, the impulse of the first positive phase of pressure and force decreases significantly. This significant effect of hydroelasticity is also found for the total force impulse on the vertical wall under wave impacts. Scattered waves were generated from the interaction of focused wave groups with an FPSO model. The results show that close to the bow of the FPSO model, the highest amplitude scattered waves are observed with the most compact model, and the third- and fourth-harmonics are significantly larger than the incident bound harmonic components. At the locations close to the stern, the linear harmonic was found to increase as the model length was decreased, although the nonlinear harmonics were similar for all three tested lengths, and the second- and third-harmonics were strongest with the medium length model. The nonlinear scattered waves increased with increasing wave steepness and a second pulse was evident in the higher-order scattered wave fields for the fixed and free floating models. In addition, the higher harmonics of the mooring line force, and the heave and pitch motions all increased with increasing wave steepness. Incident wave angles of 0 (head-on), 10 and 20 degrees were experimentally investigated in this study. As the incident wave angle between the waves and the long axis of the vessel was increased from 0 to 20 degrees, the third- and fourth-harmonic scattered waves reduced on the upstream side. These third- and fourth-harmonic diffracted waves are important in assessing wave run-up and loading for offshore structure design and ringing-type structural response in fixed and taut moored structures. The second-, third- and fourth-harmonics of the mooring line force, and the heave and pitch motions decreased as the incident wave angle increased from 0 to 20 degrees.
8

Elastohydrodynamic model of reciprocating hydraulic rod seals

Yang, Bo 23 April 2010 (has links)
Reciprocating rod seals are widely used in hydraulic systems to prevent the hydraulic fluid from leaking into and polluting the environment. In this research an elastohydrodynamic model of a generalized reciprocating hydraulic rod seal, including mixed lubrication and surface roughness, has been successfully developed. This model consists of coupled fluid mechanics, contact mechanics, thermal analysis and deformation analyses. Such model is capable of predicting the key seal performance characteristics, especially net leakage and friction force. This allows evaluation of potential seal designs and serves as design tools. Also as this model has been developed, the basic physics of seal operation has been clarified, which stimulates the development of innovative seal concepts, such as seals with engineered sealing surfaces. The results of this study indicate that in general, hydraulic rod seals operate in the mixed lubrication regime, although under certain conditions full film lubrication may occur over a portion of the sealing zone. The roughness of the seal surface and the rod speeds play important roles in determining whether or not a seal will leak. Cavitation during the outstroke and partial full film lubrication during the instroke tend to prevent net leakage. The behavior of a reciprocating hydraulic rod seal with a double lip or two seals in tandem arrangement can be very different from that of a similar seal with a single lip. For the double lip seal, the secondary lip can strongly affect the behavior of the primary lip by producing an elevated pressure in the interlip region. The same seal characteristics that promote effective sealing in a single lip seal and, in addition structural decoupling of multiple lips, are found to promote effective sealing in a multiple lip seal. The model is validated through comparisons of model predictions with experimental measurements and observations by industry partners. The results have shown the predicted leakage and friction force for various seal and operation conditions are consistent with the measurements. A seal with micro-pattern on the sealing surface also has been investigated. The results indicate that an elaborately designed pattern can improve the sealing characteristics of the seal, without significantly affecting the friction force. In the end, the selection of the rod seal for a specific application using this analytical model is demonstrated. The best design can be picked up before a prototype being built.
9

Dynamic response of a mobile offshore base hydroelastic test model /

Venkataraman, Vijay, January 2001 (has links)
Thesis (M.S.) in Mechanical Engineering--University of Maine, 2001. / Includes vita. Includes bibliographical references (leaves 123-125).
10

The numerical solution of the elastohydrodynamically lubricated line- and point contact problem, using multigrid techniques proefschrift /

Lubrecht, A. A. January 1900 (has links)
Thesis (Ph. D.)--Universiteit Twente, 1987.

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