• Refine Query
  • Source
  • Publication year
  • to
  • Language
  • 1804
  • 748
  • 595
  • 142
  • 72
  • 48
  • 46
  • 43
  • 41
  • 29
  • 27
  • 24
  • 21
  • 17
  • 14
  • Tagged with
  • 4090
  • 1628
  • 685
  • 636
  • 595
  • 572
  • 555
  • 493
  • 449
  • 388
  • 367
  • 365
  • 358
  • 352
  • 333
  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
1

Indicators of economic and social progress an assessment and an alternative /

Natoli, Riccardo. January 2008 (has links)
Thesis (Ph.D.)--Victoria University (Melbourne, Vic.), 2008.
2

Sustainability indicators in marine capture fisheries

Potts, Tavis William. January 2003 (has links)
Thesis (Ph. D.)--University of Tasmania, 2003. / Title from PDF title page (viewed on June 11, 2005). Includes bibliographical references (p. 373-393).
3

Social indicators for health in Hong Kong

Chan, Wai. January 1900 (has links)
Thesis (M.Soc.Sc.)--University of Hong Kong, 1989. / Also available in print.
4

Survival of Microbial Indicators In constructed Wetlands

Vinluan, Edlin Artuz January 1996 (has links) (PDF)
Thesis (M.S. - Soil, Water and Environmental Science)--University of Arizona. / Includes bibliographical references (leaves 61-65).
5

Evaluation of indicators of stress in populations of polar bears (Ursus maritimus) and grizzly bears (Ursus arctos)

Hamilton, Jason 07 January 2008 (has links)
Grizzly and polar bears are both species at the top of the food chain in their respective ecosystems, and as such are indicative of the overall health of the ecosystem. Presently there is little data regarding the stress status of these animals. The development of reliable indicators of stress is important as both species face rapid environmental change. Polar bears from Hudson’s Bay (Ontario, Canada) and grizzly bears from Alberta, Canada, were anaesthetized and blood samples retrieved. Samples were assayed for changes in serum-based indicators of stress. Serum cortisol levels, the predominant corticosteroid in mammals and a commonly used indicator of stress, was measured to evaluate its potential as a chronic stress indicator in bears. The induction time of the cortisol response to stressor exposure is rapid and will be influenced by the stress relating to capture. Hence, serum levels of heat shock proteins (hsps), specifically the 60 (hsp60) and 70 kilodalton (hsp70) families of hsps were also measured to evaluate their reliability as a stress indicator in bears. Traditionally, heat shock proteins have been measured in tissues; however recent studies have indicated their presence in serum in response to chronic stress. In addition, the study examined the feasibility of using corticosteroid-binding globulin (CBG), a serum protein that binds cortisol, as a stress indicator in bears. CBG regulates the availability of cortisol to the tissues (only unbound cortisol elicits a response) but unlike cortisol is not rapidly regulated by acute stress. Bear CBG was isolated and a specific anti-bear CBG antibody was generated. The development of an enzyme-linked immunoadsorbant assay (ELISA) using this bear anti-CBG has the potential to be a useful tool to determine longer-term stress response in bears. Known life-history variables were correlated to the observed levels of serum indicators to elucidate which environmental factors impact bears. The length of sea ice coverage was the strongest determinant of serum cortisol and hsp70 levels in polar bears; the longer ice cover reflects more feeding time and this is reduced through climatic warming. This suggests that fasting associated metabolic changes may be impacting serum cortisol response and hsp70 levels in polar bears. For grizzly bears the proportion of protected homerange had the strongest correlation with stress indicators. This suggests that human impact on the environment, including resource extraction and landscape changes, result in altered levels of serum cortisol and hsp70 levels. Hsp60 was not observed to vary significantly in the face of changing environmental variables, and as such no correlation could be made between serum hsp60 levels and environmental variables in bears. Serum hsp70 was observed to change significantly in response to environmental variables in both polar and grizzly bears. These data along with the changes in cortisol and other health based indicators have the potential to make hsp70 a useful indicator of altered health status in bears. This study is the first attempt to integrate the usefulness of a suite of serum indicators of stress as a tool for detecting the health status of bears. The lack of a control group for comparison to wild population limits the utility of the observed variables as a tool to detect stressed states in bears. However, as these serum indicators are also modulated by the animals health life-history, including food limitation, the monitoring of these serum stress indicators, along with other indicators of fed and fasted states, may give a better picture of the health status of the animal related to nutrient availability.
6

Evaluation of indicators of stress in populations of polar bears (Ursus maritimus) and grizzly bears (Ursus arctos)

Hamilton, Jason 07 January 2008 (has links)
Grizzly and polar bears are both species at the top of the food chain in their respective ecosystems, and as such are indicative of the overall health of the ecosystem. Presently there is little data regarding the stress status of these animals. The development of reliable indicators of stress is important as both species face rapid environmental change. Polar bears from Hudson’s Bay (Ontario, Canada) and grizzly bears from Alberta, Canada, were anaesthetized and blood samples retrieved. Samples were assayed for changes in serum-based indicators of stress. Serum cortisol levels, the predominant corticosteroid in mammals and a commonly used indicator of stress, was measured to evaluate its potential as a chronic stress indicator in bears. The induction time of the cortisol response to stressor exposure is rapid and will be influenced by the stress relating to capture. Hence, serum levels of heat shock proteins (hsps), specifically the 60 (hsp60) and 70 kilodalton (hsp70) families of hsps were also measured to evaluate their reliability as a stress indicator in bears. Traditionally, heat shock proteins have been measured in tissues; however recent studies have indicated their presence in serum in response to chronic stress. In addition, the study examined the feasibility of using corticosteroid-binding globulin (CBG), a serum protein that binds cortisol, as a stress indicator in bears. CBG regulates the availability of cortisol to the tissues (only unbound cortisol elicits a response) but unlike cortisol is not rapidly regulated by acute stress. Bear CBG was isolated and a specific anti-bear CBG antibody was generated. The development of an enzyme-linked immunoadsorbant assay (ELISA) using this bear anti-CBG has the potential to be a useful tool to determine longer-term stress response in bears. Known life-history variables were correlated to the observed levels of serum indicators to elucidate which environmental factors impact bears. The length of sea ice coverage was the strongest determinant of serum cortisol and hsp70 levels in polar bears; the longer ice cover reflects more feeding time and this is reduced through climatic warming. This suggests that fasting associated metabolic changes may be impacting serum cortisol response and hsp70 levels in polar bears. For grizzly bears the proportion of protected homerange had the strongest correlation with stress indicators. This suggests that human impact on the environment, including resource extraction and landscape changes, result in altered levels of serum cortisol and hsp70 levels. Hsp60 was not observed to vary significantly in the face of changing environmental variables, and as such no correlation could be made between serum hsp60 levels and environmental variables in bears. Serum hsp70 was observed to change significantly in response to environmental variables in both polar and grizzly bears. These data along with the changes in cortisol and other health based indicators have the potential to make hsp70 a useful indicator of altered health status in bears. This study is the first attempt to integrate the usefulness of a suite of serum indicators of stress as a tool for detecting the health status of bears. The lack of a control group for comparison to wild population limits the utility of the observed variables as a tool to detect stressed states in bears. However, as these serum indicators are also modulated by the animals health life-history, including food limitation, the monitoring of these serum stress indicators, along with other indicators of fed and fasted states, may give a better picture of the health status of the animal related to nutrient availability.
7

Quantitative methods for performance measurement systems

Suwignjo, Patdono January 1999 (has links)
The business environment has changed dramatically since the 1980s. Many researchers have shown that the traditional financially-based performance measurement systems have failed to cope with the current dynamic business environment. Even although new performance measurement systems have been proposed, such as Activity-Based Costing, the Balanced Scorecard, the SMART system, the Performance Measurement Questionnaires and the Cambridge model, the problem of quantifying the interaction of the factors affecting business performance still remains. The objectives of this thesis are: 1. To develop a performance measurement system model that can be used to quantify the effects of factors on performance and consolidate them into a single performance indicator. 2. To develop a model for reducing the number of performance reports. 3. To carry out experiments for testing the validity, applicability and stability of the models developed. To achieve these objectives this thesis reviews research methodology literature, studies the traditional and new performance measurement systems, identifies the current problems of performance measurement systems, reviews existing methods for identifying, structuring and prioritising performance measures, reviews the multicriteria methods, studies the analytic hierarchy process (AHP) and its controversy, develops quantitative methods for performance measurement systems and carries out experiments to test the validity, stability and applicability of the methods developed. To quantify the effect of factors on performance and consolidate them into a single performance indicator a quantitative method for performance measurement system (QMPMS) was developed. The method uses cognitive maps for identifying factors affecting performance and their relationship, structured diagrams for structuring the factors hierarchically and analytic hierarchy process for quantifying the effects of factors on performance. The method was then extended to reduce the number of performance reports. The QMPMS and its extension were implemented in three case studies to test their theoretical and application validity. The first case study applied the models to 'J&B Scotland Ltd.' to identify whether the models can produce the intended outputs. The second case study applied the QMPMS to 'Seagate Distribution (UK) Ltd.' to test the validity (accuracy) and stability of the QMPMS. Finally, the third case implemented the QMPMS to quantify and consolidate Inland Revenue, Cumbernauld's performance measures. It was found from the experiments that the QMPMS is quite accurate (the mean percentage of deviation is less than 4 percent), stable for a reasonable period of time and it can be applied comfortably to real cases. The QMPMS is now being used by the Inland Revenue - Cumbernauld for producing a single performance indicator of their business processes and overall office.
8

The water quality of the Ouseburn : a part urban, part rural catchment

Turnbull, David Andrew January 1994 (has links)
No description available.
9

The content evaluation of British scientific research

Cunningham, Scott Woodroofe January 1996 (has links)
No description available.
10

Health status in Bangladesh: a critical review

Rashed, Shifa Rahman. January 2000 (has links)
published_or_final_version / Medical Sciences / Master / Master of Medical Sciences

Page generated in 0.0617 seconds