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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
11

The developing rat kidney : the dopamine system and related serine/threonine kinases and phosphatases /

Svennilson, Johan, January 1900 (has links)
Diss. (sammanfattning) Stockholm : Karol. inst. / Härtill 5 uppsatser.
12

Some cultural and environmental factors affecting snap bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) growth and root rot incidence

Mohamed, Ali Khalafalla, January 1900 (has links)
Thesis--Wisconsin. / Vita. Includes bibliographical references (leaves 112-125).
13

Recurrent selection for increased seed yield and percentage seed protein in the common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) using a selection index; and Isolation and analysis of major genes controlling phaseolin.

Sullivan, Joseph G. January 1981 (has links)
Thesis (Ph. D.)--University of Wisconsin--Madison, 1981. / Typescript. Vita. Description based on print version record. Includes bibliographical references (leaves 104-114).
14

Tissue analysis for Mn in snapbeans (Phaseolus vulgaris, L.)

Ricker, Maryann Hamilton. January 1979 (has links)
Thesis (M.S.)--University of Wisconsin--Madison. / Typescript. eContent provider-neutral record in process. Description based on print version record. Includes bibliographical references (leaves 68-73).
15

Systems of renal physiology before Malpighi

Triolo, Victor Anthony, January 1900 (has links)
Thesis (Ph. D.)--University of Wisconsin--Madison, 1962. / Typescript. Vita. eContent provider-neutral record in process. Description based on print version record. Includes bibliographical references.
16

Combining ability analysis and evaluation of near-homozygous lines of snap beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L.)

Leal, Nilton Rocha. January 1978 (has links)
Thesis--University of Wisconsin--Madison. / Typescript. Vita. eContent provider-neutral record in process. Description based on print version record. Includes bibliographical references (leaves 62-65).
17

Mechanisms and inheritance of resistance to ozone in Phaseolus vulgaris L

Butler, Linda Knudson. January 1978 (has links)
Thesis--Wisconsin. / Vita. Includes bibliographical references (leaves 71-75).
18

In vitro kidney storage

Ackermann, John Richard Wilson 08 May 2017 (has links)
No description available.
19

Outcome of HIV positive patients presenting with renal failure at Charlotte Maxeke Johannesburg Academic Hospital

Vachiat, Ahmed Ismail 24 January 2013 (has links)
Outcome of HIV positive patients presenting with renal failure at Charlotte Maxeke Johannesburg Academic Hospital (CMJAH) Background The majority of the 33.4 million people infected with HIV worldwide reside in sub-Saharan Africa. The HIV prevalence amongst young South Africans (ages 15- 49) is 16%. HIV is the third leading cause of ESRD in African - Americans aged 20-64 in the United States. There is a paucity of data regarding the prevalence of acute kidney injury (AKI) in HIV patients in sub-Saharan Africa. Methods A retrospective review of 101 HIV positive patients presenting with renal failure at the CMJAH from 1st October 2005 until 31st October 2006 was undertaken. There were 50 HIV positive patients with presumed AKI that were compared to 90 HIV negative patients with AKI. Results A total of 684 patients presented with renal failure, 101(14.8%) of whom were HIV positive. Ninetynine of the HIV positive patients were black and 56 were male. The mean age of HIV positive patients with renal failure was 38 years. Fifty-seven patients presented with AKI (seven patients were excluded due to lack of records), 21 with acute on chronic renal failure and 23 with chronic renal failure. The causes of AKI in the HIV positive group included sepsis (62%), haemodynamic instability (20%), toxins (10%), urological obstruction (8%) and miscellaneous (10%). The common underlying aetiologies of the 90 HIV negative patients studied presenting with AKI were sepsis (43%), haemodynamic instability (17%), toxins (7%), urological obstruction (8%) and miscellaneous (23%). Forty-seven (52%) of these HIV negative patients recovered. Forty-two (47%) patients died, compared with 22 (44%) patients in the HIV positive group. Hyponatraemia, hyperkalaemia, hypochloraemia and acidosis were more common in the HIV positive patients. Dialysis was initiated in 36% of HIV positive patients with AKI. There were more HIV positive patients that recovered with supportive care, including fluid therapy when compared to HIV negative patients. Recovery was noted to be more rapid in the HIV positive group. Using survival and death as the outcome there was no difference between the HIV positive and the HIV negative group presenting with AKI (p<0.7173). Discussion HIV positive patients presented with renal failure at a younger age – a mean age of 38 years in this study. Previous studies have shown mean ages ranging from 35 years to 46.7 years. The majority of the HIV positive patients presenting with renal failure were black (98%). The racial predominance is different to that of other countries which might be due to epidemiological factors. The gender differences were similar when compared to other studies. Sepsis was the more common aetiological factor of AKI (62% of HIV positive patients compared to 43% of HIV negative patients). HIV positive patients with AKI presented at an advanced stage of immunosuppression (more than 50% had CD4<100cells/μl). Electrolyte disturbances were common in HIV positive patients with AKI. Conclusion HIV positive patients with AKI presented with advanced immunosuppression. Sepsis was the most common aetiology of AKI. Supportive management or renal replacement therapy resulted in recovery in a large number of patients.HIV positive patients should be treated acutely just as HIV negative patients and should not be excluded on the basis of their HIV status. Dialysis should be offered when indicated and aggressive fluid resuscitation should be emphasized. Outcomes were similar in HIV positive and HIV negative patients presenting with AKI.
20

Characterization of the Role of Shroom3 in Nephron Formation

KITALA, PATRICIA January 2019 (has links)
Proper development of the nephron, the functional unit of the kidney, is essential for kidney function. The nephron develops from a pool of cap mesenchymal cells, as defined by a cluster of cells adjacent to the ureteric bud tips of branching ureteric epithelium, giving rise to two subset populations: the self renewing cells and the nephron progenitors. These nephron progenitors undergo mesenchymal-epithelial transition (MET) to develop into polarized renal vesicles (RV), and eventually fuse with the epithelial tubule to develop into a mature nephron. Although these processes are essential for the formation of functional kidneys, little is known about the molecular mechanisms that regulate them. In this study, we characterize several steps during cap mesenchyme and renal vesicle formation using our Shroom3 knockout mouse kidney as our model. Previous researchers have associated Shroom3 with chronic kidney disease. Detecting and analyzing the genetic components of CKD is needed to improve our understanding of its pathogenesis. Shroom3 encodes an actin-binding protein that regulates cell shape changes through induction of apical constriction. However, there is a lack of evidence about Shroom3’s expression pattern and functional role upstream of developed nephrons. Here, I defined the spatial and temporal expression of Shroom3 within the cap mesenchyme region. I investigated the nephron progenitors between Shroom3 wildtypes and mutants. Lastly, I analyzed the renal vesicle polarity in mutants, by analyzing apical membrane markers on RVs to characterize any abnormalities in their orientation and establishment of polarity. / Thesis / Master of Science in Medical Sciences (MSMS)

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