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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
1

Mangrove wetlands in Bangladesh /

Begum, Fatema. January 1998 (has links) (PDF)
Thesis (M. Env. Sc.)--University of Adelaide, Mawson Graduate Centre for Environmental Studies, 1998. / Includes bibliographical references (leaves 65-71).
2

Modeling the response of mangrove ecosystems to herbicide spraying, hurricanes, nutrient enrichment and economic development

Sell, Maurice George, January 1977 (has links)
Thesis--University of Florida. / Description based on print version record. Typescript. Vita. Includes bibliographical references (leaves 382-389).
3

Mangrove and saltmarsh surface elevation dynamics in relation to environmental variables in Southeastern Australia

Rogers, Kerrylee. January 2004 (has links)
Thesis (Ph.D.)--University of Wollongong, 2004. / Typescript. Includes bibliographical references: leaf 237-270.
4

An appraisal of warm temperate mangrove estuaries as food patches using zooplankton and RNA: DNA ratios of Gilchristella aestuaria larvae as indicators

Bornman, Eugin January 2018 (has links)
Mangrove habitats are considered as the ideal fish nursery as they are known to increase the growth and survival of juvenile fishes by providing enhanced food availability and protection. However, most studies have focused on tropical mangroves with a few recent warm temperate studies finding conflicting results. Furthermore, the nursery value of South African mangroves to fishes remain understudied in subtropical areas, while warm temperate mangroves are yet to be evaluated. This study aimed to assess whether mangrove presence leads to any advantage to the larvae of an important estuarine resident fish species, Gilchristella aestuaria, by comparing the food patch quality of South African warm temperate mangrove and non-mangrove estuaries. Results indicate that larvae fed primarily on the dominant prey species, Pseudodiaptomus hessei, Paracrtia longipatella, and Acartiella natalensis. However, postflexion larvae consumed more of the larger species, P. hessei, within the two mangrove estuaries (16.09 %V in Nahoon and 13.79 %V in Xhora) than the two nonmangrove estuaries (12.20 %V in Gonubie and 7.05 %V in Qora), despite other prey species occurring at similar densities. Results indicate that mangrove habitats acted as sediment sinks, slightly reducing the turbidity of these estuaries which resulted in postflexion larvae actively selecting larger, more nutritious prey, which in turn, significantly increased their individual instantaneous growth rates (0.11 ± 0.21 Gi) when compared to postflexion larvae in non-mangrove estuaries (0.09 ± 0.12 Gi). This study found that mangrove presence was significantly related to postflexion larval densities when coupled with abiotic (such as temperature and turbidity) and biotic factors (such as predator-prey interactions). Understanding the spatial and temporal dynamics, predator-prey interactions as well as the growth and survival of G. aestuaria is particularly important as they are key zooplanktivores that are prey to other species in estuarine food webs.
5

Nutrient dynamics at Matapouri Estuary, Northern New Zealand

Soliman, Nabil Zaki Gadalla Unknown Date (has links)
Mangrove forests are an integral part of coastal wetlands in temperate and tropical regions of the world, including New Zealand. These coastal plants act as a shelter,feeding and breeding grounds for marine and terrestrial organisms. Many overseas studies have investigated the importance of mangrove and seagrass habitats in sustaining coastal food chains. In New Zealand, however, only a few studies have addressed the ecology and food web dynamics of these temperate ecosystems.As a first step to investigate the nutrient dynamics of estuarine food webs in temperate estuaries, this study aimed to quantify the nutrient concentrations in the catchment and the estuary of Matapouri, northern New Zealand. Field studies involved the collection of surface fresh and estuarine water (during low and high tides). Plant material (mangrove and seagrass), and sediment samples were collected at various sites within the estuary. Chemical analyses were carried out to determine the concentration of C, N, P and Si macronutrients and Fe and Zn micronutrients during different seasonal rainfall events.The results suggest that mangrove habitats may act as a source of POC, but not DOC for the adjacent aquatic habitats (i.e., seagrass, sand flats, channels), while seasgrass beds contribute more N to the estuarine system than the mangrove forests. The concentrations of N and P nutrients are strongly influenced by both the freshwater inputs and the bio-chemical processes within the estuary. The results obtained point to the freshwater streams as the main source of Si and Fe in the estuary. However, Zn was higher in the estuarine water compared to the catchment freshwater. NO3 -, NH4 +, Fe and Zn concentrations showed strong responses to the higher rainfall months reaching their highest level during the winter and early spring seasons. Conversely, P concentrations showed a negative seasonal pattern, which was linked to monthly rainfall events.Mangrove sediments may operate as a sink for the heavy metal Zn in Matapouri estuary. Iron concentration in seagrass leaves exceeded that in mangrove leaves by 65 orders of magnitude. The study suggests that seagrass plants could be used as a biological indicator of iron concentration in the estuary. The complex dynamics of bio-chemical cycles in Matapouri indicate that each habitat within the estuary has specific nutrient contributions to the estuarine food web system. However, the catchment and oceanic influences must also be considered in the nutrient balance of these coastal environments.
6

Temperate urban mangrove forests : their ecological linkages with adjacent habitats

Yerman, Michelle N., University of Western Sydney, College of Science, Technology and Environment, School of Natural Sciences January 2003 (has links)
Estuarine habitats along the temperate south-eastern shores of Australia are generally made up of salt marsh, mangrove forests and seagrass beds. In urban areas these habitats have been progressively fragmented as a result of population increase and industrial expansion. Salt marshes in particular have been vulnerable to urban expansion and reclamation because of their close proximity to densely populated areas, while mangrove forests have been less often reclaimed because of frequent tidal inundation. The effect of reclamation of salt marshes on the biotic assemblages and functioning of mangrove forests with an adjacent salt marsh, park or bund wall was examined at nine separate locations on the Parramatta River, Sydney NSW. A mensurative approach was used to describe the patterns of distribution and abundance of macro fauna at several temporal and spatial scales. The implications for management are that salt marshes are an integral part of estuaries, and smaller patches of salt marsh are just as important as larger patches in maintaining the diversity of faunal assemblages and ecosystem functioning in mangrove forests in urban areas / Master of Science (Hons)
7

Temperate urban mangrove forests : their ecological linkages with adjacent habitats

Yerman, Michelle N., University of Western Sydney, College of Science, Technology and Environment, School of Natural Sciences January 2003 (has links)
Estuarine habitats along the temperate south-eastern shores of Australia are generally made up of salt marsh, mangrove forests and seagrass beds. In urban areas these habitats have been progressively fragmented as a result of population increase and industrial expansion. Salt marshes in particular have been vulnerable to urban expansion and reclamation because of their close proximity to densely populated areas, while mangrove forests have been less often reclaimed because of frequent tidal inundation. The effect of reclamation of salt marshes on the biotic assemblages and functioning of mangrove forests with an adjacent salt marsh, park or bund wall was examined at nine separate locations on the Parramatta River, Sydney NSW. A mensurative approach was used to describe the patterns of distribution and abundance of macro fauna at several temporal and spatial scales. The implications for management are that salt marshes are an integral part of estuaries, and smaller patches of salt marsh are just as important as larger patches in maintaining the diversity of faunal assemblages and ecosystem functioning in mangrove forests in urban areas / Master of Science (Hons)
8

Coastal landforms and vegetation associations of the straits of Infiernillo Region, Sonora, Mexico: a poleward habitat for mangroves

Sherwin, Robert Winslow, 1945- January 1971 (has links)
No description available.
9

Nutrient dynamics at Matapouri Estuary, Northern New Zealand thesis submitted in (partial) fulfilment of the degree of Master of Applied Science, Auckland University of Technology, June 2004.

Soliman, Nabil Zaki Gadalla. January 2004 (has links) (PDF)
Thesis (MAppSc) -- Auckland University of Technology, 2004. / Also held in print (214 leaves, 30 cm.) in Wellesley Theses Collection (T 577.698 SOL)
10

Mangroves, shrimp aquaculture and coastal livelihoods in the Estero Real, Gulf of Fonseca, Nicaragua

Benessaiah, Karina. January 1900 (has links)
Thesis (M.Sc.). / Written for the Dept. of Geography. Title from title page of PDF (viewed 2008/12/04). Includes bibliographical references.

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