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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
1

The role of MAP kinases in the regulation of mechanical load induced procollagen gene expression in cardiac fibroblasts

Papakrivopoulou, Eugenia Spyridoula January 2001 (has links)
No description available.
2

Glucose-regulated gene transcription in pancreatic islet #beta#-cells

Da Silva Xavier, Gabriela January 2000 (has links)
No description available.
3

Role of phosphatases in controlling arabidopsis mapk signalling cascades

Lee, Jin Suk 05 1900 (has links)
Plants possess integrated signalling networks that mediate the responses to various environmental conditions. Mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) constitute a highly conserved family of enzymes in eukaryotes, and in plants MAPK-based signal transduction modules regulate a large number of physiological processes, including responses to environmental stresses and phytohormones. Regulated dephosphorylation of active MAPKs is a key component of the control of MAPK signalling cascades, and in mammals, members of the MAPK phosphatase (MKP) sub-class of dual-specificity tyrosine phosphatases have been recognized as key players for inactivating MAPKs. Five MKP homologues are found in Arabidopsis thaliana, but only limited information is available concerning their properties and biological roles. Based on initial data derived from my reverse genetics and protein interaction studies of these five potential MKPs, as well as gene function information in the literature, I chose to focus on two putative Arabidopsis MKPs, AtMKP2 and Indole-3-Butyric Acid-response 5 (IBR5). By using a combination of genetic and biochemical studies, I established that the previously uncharacterized MKP designated AtMKP2, participates in the regulation of cellular homeostasis in ozone-challenged tissue, and can influence the activation state of two MAPKs, MPK3 and MPK6. AtMKP2-suppressed plants displayed significantly prolonged MPK3 and MPK6 activation during ozone treatment, and recombinant AtMKP2 was able to dephosphorylate both phospho-MPK3 and phospho-MPK6 in vitro, providing direct evidence that AtMKP2 may target these oxidant-activated MAPKs. A mutation in IBR5, one of the five potential AtMKPs, was previously reported to confer reduced sensitivity to auxin and ABA in Arabidopsis. My protein interaction studies demonstrated that IBR5 and MPK12 are physically coupled and that the C-terminus of MPK12 is essential for its interaction with IBR5. In vitro dephosphorylation assays indicated that recombinant phosphoMPK12 is efficiently dephosphorylated by IBR5. In transgenic plants with reduced expression of the MPK12 gene, root growth is hypersensitive to exogenous auxins, consistent with the lower auxin sensitivity reported for ibr5 mutants. Taken together, my data demonstrate for the first time that both AtMKP2 and IBR5 are bona fide Arabidopsis MAPK phosphatases and that they serve as important regulators of oxidative stress and auxin signalling, respectively, in Arabidopsis.
4

Role of phosphatases in controlling arabidopsis mapk signalling cascades

Lee, Jin Suk 05 1900 (has links)
Plants possess integrated signalling networks that mediate the responses to various environmental conditions. Mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) constitute a highly conserved family of enzymes in eukaryotes, and in plants MAPK-based signal transduction modules regulate a large number of physiological processes, including responses to environmental stresses and phytohormones. Regulated dephosphorylation of active MAPKs is a key component of the control of MAPK signalling cascades, and in mammals, members of the MAPK phosphatase (MKP) sub-class of dual-specificity tyrosine phosphatases have been recognized as key players for inactivating MAPKs. Five MKP homologues are found in Arabidopsis thaliana, but only limited information is available concerning their properties and biological roles. Based on initial data derived from my reverse genetics and protein interaction studies of these five potential MKPs, as well as gene function information in the literature, I chose to focus on two putative Arabidopsis MKPs, AtMKP2 and Indole-3-Butyric Acid-response 5 (IBR5). By using a combination of genetic and biochemical studies, I established that the previously uncharacterized MKP designated AtMKP2, participates in the regulation of cellular homeostasis in ozone-challenged tissue, and can influence the activation state of two MAPKs, MPK3 and MPK6. AtMKP2-suppressed plants displayed significantly prolonged MPK3 and MPK6 activation during ozone treatment, and recombinant AtMKP2 was able to dephosphorylate both phospho-MPK3 and phospho-MPK6 in vitro, providing direct evidence that AtMKP2 may target these oxidant-activated MAPKs. A mutation in IBR5, one of the five potential AtMKPs, was previously reported to confer reduced sensitivity to auxin and ABA in Arabidopsis. My protein interaction studies demonstrated that IBR5 and MPK12 are physically coupled and that the C-terminus of MPK12 is essential for its interaction with IBR5. In vitro dephosphorylation assays indicated that recombinant phosphoMPK12 is efficiently dephosphorylated by IBR5. In transgenic plants with reduced expression of the MPK12 gene, root growth is hypersensitive to exogenous auxins, consistent with the lower auxin sensitivity reported for ibr5 mutants. Taken together, my data demonstrate for the first time that both AtMKP2 and IBR5 are bona fide Arabidopsis MAPK phosphatases and that they serve as important regulators of oxidative stress and auxin signalling, respectively, in Arabidopsis.
5

Role of phosphatases in controlling arabidopsis mapk signalling cascades

Lee, Jin Suk 05 1900 (has links)
Plants possess integrated signalling networks that mediate the responses to various environmental conditions. Mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) constitute a highly conserved family of enzymes in eukaryotes, and in plants MAPK-based signal transduction modules regulate a large number of physiological processes, including responses to environmental stresses and phytohormones. Regulated dephosphorylation of active MAPKs is a key component of the control of MAPK signalling cascades, and in mammals, members of the MAPK phosphatase (MKP) sub-class of dual-specificity tyrosine phosphatases have been recognized as key players for inactivating MAPKs. Five MKP homologues are found in Arabidopsis thaliana, but only limited information is available concerning their properties and biological roles. Based on initial data derived from my reverse genetics and protein interaction studies of these five potential MKPs, as well as gene function information in the literature, I chose to focus on two putative Arabidopsis MKPs, AtMKP2 and Indole-3-Butyric Acid-response 5 (IBR5). By using a combination of genetic and biochemical studies, I established that the previously uncharacterized MKP designated AtMKP2, participates in the regulation of cellular homeostasis in ozone-challenged tissue, and can influence the activation state of two MAPKs, MPK3 and MPK6. AtMKP2-suppressed plants displayed significantly prolonged MPK3 and MPK6 activation during ozone treatment, and recombinant AtMKP2 was able to dephosphorylate both phospho-MPK3 and phospho-MPK6 in vitro, providing direct evidence that AtMKP2 may target these oxidant-activated MAPKs. A mutation in IBR5, one of the five potential AtMKPs, was previously reported to confer reduced sensitivity to auxin and ABA in Arabidopsis. My protein interaction studies demonstrated that IBR5 and MPK12 are physically coupled and that the C-terminus of MPK12 is essential for its interaction with IBR5. In vitro dephosphorylation assays indicated that recombinant phosphoMPK12 is efficiently dephosphorylated by IBR5. In transgenic plants with reduced expression of the MPK12 gene, root growth is hypersensitive to exogenous auxins, consistent with the lower auxin sensitivity reported for ibr5 mutants. Taken together, my data demonstrate for the first time that both AtMKP2 and IBR5 are bona fide Arabidopsis MAPK phosphatases and that they serve as important regulators of oxidative stress and auxin signalling, respectively, in Arabidopsis. / Science, Faculty of / Botany, Department of / Graduate
6

Molecular Correlates of Adaptation and Apoptosis: p38 Signaling in Hippocampus

Niswander, Julie M. 27 May 2004 (has links)
No description available.
7

Molecular cloning of mitogen-activated protein kinase cDNA and study of ethylene signaling in senescent sweet potato leaves

Shen, Che-yu 08 April 2011 (has links)
Ethylene is a plant growth regulator and plays a key role in leaf senescence. Its signaling, however, remains mostly unclear in sweet potato. Ethephon, an ethylene releasing compound, induced sweet potato detached leaf senescence and associated gene expression, and the effects were repressed by mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) kinase inhibitor PD98059. These data suggest that MAPK cascade is likely involved in ethylene signaling leading to leaf senescence and associated gene expression. With gene-specific primers and RT-PCR methods, a full-length cDNA, SPMAPK, was isolated from ethephon-treated sweet potato leaves. SPMAPK contained 1098 nucleotides (365 amino acids) in the open reading frame. Sweet potato SPMAPK also exhibited high amino acid sequence identities (ca. 79.8% to 83.4%) with plant MAPKs, and was most close to Arabidopsis MPK3 and MPK6 in phylogenetic tree analysis. RT-PCR analysis showed that SPMAPK gene expression was detected in roots, stems, and leaves. The mature and partial yellowing leaves expressed higher amount. SPMAPK gene expression was also inducible and significantly enhanced by ethephon. Results from studies with inhibitors or effectors showed that ethephon treatment resulted in acceleration of leaf senescence in detached sweet potato leaves, promotion of leaf chlorophyll content reduction and decrease of photochemical Fv/Fm, and induction of associated gene expression. These ethephon-mediated effects were all delayed or repressed by pretreatment with ethylene receptor inhibitor 1-methylcyclopropene (1-MCP), MAPK kinase inhibitor PD98059, NADPH oxidase inhibitor diphenyleneiodonium (DPI), antioxidant reduced glutathione, calcium ion chelator EGTA, and de novo protein synthesis inhibitor cycloheximide, respectively. Based on these results we conclude that an ethylene-inducible mitogen-activated protein kinase SPMAPK was isolated from sweet potato leaves, and expressed higher amount in mature and partial yellowing leaves. Ethephon-induced sweet potato SPMAPK expression was significantly repressed by 1-MCP, PD98059, DPI, reduced glutathione, EGTA and cycloheximide. These data also suggest that the possible signal components in ethephon-mediated leaf senescence and associated gene expression in sweet potato leaves likely include ethylene receptor, MAPK cascade, elevated H2O2 , external calcium influx, and de novo synthesized proteins. A possible ethylene signaling model leading to sweet potato leaf senescence and associated gene expression was also proposed.
8

Krylov and Finite State Projection methods for simulating stochastic biochemical kinetics via the Chemical Master Equation

Shevarl MacNamara Unknown Date (has links)
Computational and mathematical models of cellular processes promise great benets in important elds such as molecular biology and medicine. Increasingly, researchers are incorporating the fundamentally discrete and stochastic nature of biochemical processes into the mathematical models that are intended to represent them. This has led to the formulation of models for genetic networks as continuous-time, discrete state, Markov processes, giving rise to the so-called Chemical Master Equation (CME), which is a discrete, partial dierential equation, that governs the evolution of the associated probability distribution function (PDF). While promising many insights, the CME is computationally challenging, especially as the dimension of the model grows. In this thesis, novel methods are developed for computing the PDF of the Master Equation. The problems associated with the high-dimensional nature of the Chemical Master Equation are addressed by adapting Krylov methods, in combination with Finite State Projection methods, to derive algorithms well-suited to the Master Equation. Variations of the approach that incorporate the Strang splitting and a stochastic analogue of the total quasi-steady-state approximation are also derived for chemical systems with disparate rates. Monte Carlo approaches, such as the Stochastic Simulation Algorithm, that simulate trajectories of the process governed by the CME have been a very popular approach and we compare these with the PDF approaches developed in this thesis. The thesis concludes with a discussion of various implementation issues along with numerical results for important applications in systems biology, including the gene toggle, the Goldbeter-Koshland switch and the Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Cascade.
9

Krylov and Finite State Projection methods for simulating stochastic biochemical kinetics via the Chemical Master Equation

Shevarl MacNamara Unknown Date (has links)
Computational and mathematical models of cellular processes promise great benets in important elds such as molecular biology and medicine. Increasingly, researchers are incorporating the fundamentally discrete and stochastic nature of biochemical processes into the mathematical models that are intended to represent them. This has led to the formulation of models for genetic networks as continuous-time, discrete state, Markov processes, giving rise to the so-called Chemical Master Equation (CME), which is a discrete, partial dierential equation, that governs the evolution of the associated probability distribution function (PDF). While promising many insights, the CME is computationally challenging, especially as the dimension of the model grows. In this thesis, novel methods are developed for computing the PDF of the Master Equation. The problems associated with the high-dimensional nature of the Chemical Master Equation are addressed by adapting Krylov methods, in combination with Finite State Projection methods, to derive algorithms well-suited to the Master Equation. Variations of the approach that incorporate the Strang splitting and a stochastic analogue of the total quasi-steady-state approximation are also derived for chemical systems with disparate rates. Monte Carlo approaches, such as the Stochastic Simulation Algorithm, that simulate trajectories of the process governed by the CME have been a very popular approach and we compare these with the PDF approaches developed in this thesis. The thesis concludes with a discussion of various implementation issues along with numerical results for important applications in systems biology, including the gene toggle, the Goldbeter-Koshland switch and the Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Cascade.
10

The roles of ERK₁ and ERK₂ MAP kinase in neural development and disease

Samuels, Ivy S. January 2008 (has links)
Thesis (Ph. D.)--Case Western Reserve University, 2008. / [School of Medicine] Department of Neurosciences. Includes bibliographical references.

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