• Refine Query
  • Source
  • Publication year
  • to
  • Language
  • 1166
  • 234
  • 220
  • 109
  • 44
  • 37
  • 35
  • 15
  • 14
  • 13
  • 12
  • 9
  • 8
  • 8
  • 8
  • Tagged with
  • 2198
  • 2198
  • 850
  • 420
  • 306
  • 271
  • 251
  • 245
  • 234
  • 198
  • 193
  • 172
  • 164
  • 161
  • 158
  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
41

Faculty integration of computer-mediated learning technologies into teaching praxis

Parchoma, Gale Ann 23 April 2007
The purpose of the study was to examine organizational structural, cultural, pedagogical, and economic (reward system) elements of a traditional research-oriented university for influences on faculty adoption of computer-mediated learning technologies (CMLTs). Emergent driving and restraining societal and organizational influences (Lewin, 1951) on faculty members adoption of CMLTs were examined. Faculty members perceptions of the extent to which university policies and practices were aligned to support the successful design, development, and implementation of CMLTs were explored. <p>A case study of faculty members, who had led CMLT development teams in a provincially funded Technology Enhanced Learning (TEL) initiative at one university between 2000 and 2005, was conducted in four stages. In the first stage of the study, focus groups and members checks were held with instructional designers in order to identify potentially information-rich CMLT projects. Findings from this included an examination of the social negotiation process among members of CMLT development teams, and provided the bases for selecting faculty members to invite to participate in the study. Stage Two was a pilot of the faculty interview protocol that resulted in protocol refinement. In Stage Three, seven faculty members and one graduate student participated in interviews and members checks of the results. Faculty members were asked to describe their motivations for adopting CMLTs into teaching praxis, any resultant changes to their scholarship of teaching, the compensation they received for time invested in pedagogical and technological innovation, and the extent to which institutional structures, cultures, and policies had supported or impeded their efforts. Stage Four involved an environmental scan of institutional and provincial documentation of the TEL initiative as an avenue to corroborating interview data.<p>In this study, it was found that faculty motivations for CMLT adoption included individual responses to departmental initiatives, curricular renewal and standardization activities, personal-professional development, integrating research into teaching, enhancing student learning, increasing the flexibility of student access to learning opportunities, and improving communications with students. Participants reported a variety of resultant changes to their scholarship of teaching: (1) a shift away from traditional lectures and toward learner-focused tutorials, small group and peer-to-peer discussions, and independent learning opportunities for students accessing electronic learning resources; (2) a new or renewed interest in using innovative instructional strategies and learning environments; and (3) a new or heightened interest in researching educational effectiveness. Organizational support for CMLT projects included fiscal support from the TEL program, and in some cases, additional funding provided by departments or colleges; project management support from the institution; pedagogical support from instructional designers; technical and aesthetic support from information technologists, media developers, graphic artists, and a medical illustrator. Organizational and cultural impediments to successful completion of projects varied across college settings. Lack of sufficient time to devote to CMLT development projects, balancing competing research, teaching, and administrative responsibilities with project activities, and therefore, coping with a mismatch between tenure and promotion requirements and necessary time commitments to CMLT projects were pervasive. Difficulties in coordinating large development teams, the slow pace of acquiring approvals for new programs, problematic project management models, and colleagues skepticism about and fear of integrating technology into teaching were common themes. <p>This study surfaced implications for organizational change that could better enable faculty efforts to adopt CMLTs. Expanding tenure and promotion criteria to include CMLT development work (Archer, Garrison, & Anderson, 1999; Hagner & Schneebeck, 2001) and revising intellectual property policies for CMLT artifacts to better acknowledge faculty efforts (Hilton & Neal, 2001; Tallman, 2000) could do much to encourage the integration of technology into teaching. Promoting educational effectiveness research studies (Chyung, 2001), and bringing CMLT efforts in from the margins to become a core activity in the scholarship of teaching (Bates, 2001) could erode current skepticism and fear about technologies displacing faculty members (Olcott & Schmidt, 2000). <p>Finally, in this study, theoretical implications for organizational change were posited. Traditional centralized and bureaucratic management styles are not well suited to supporting CMLT initiatives in higher education (Bates, 2001). A more distributed approach to leadership (Knapper, 2006) could better support necessary efforts to innovate, experiment, prototype, evaluate in order to incrementally improve project outcomes (Suter, 2001), create synergies between teaching and research activities, and garner faculty commitment to integrating computer-mediated learning technologies into contemporary teaching praxis.
42

Transition to a focused factory of the future : a case study of an organization's cultural change

Huston, J. T. 03 June 2011 (has links)
The purpose of this study was to investigate and describe an organization's transition to a focused factory of the future. This transition entailed broad changes in manufacturing equipment/technology, manufacturing processes, and organizational culture.The findings of the study included:The organization focused one product model rather than focusing their two major product lines simultaneously. The result was new and stronger barriers emerging rather than the cited objective of breaking down barriers. There was a concentrated effort by the local labor union to resist the new changes while maintaining their own cultural identity.Many of the problems which impeded the transition resulted from external sources where the organization had limited control. These problems with external sources were:1. Conflicts with the organization's corporate headquarters who held an opposing interpretation as to the extent to which the organization should focus.2. Costly delays resulting from machine vendors not meeting their delivery dates.3. Time pressures resulting from deadlines administered by the organization's customer.4. Substantial quality problems experienced from a dependence on a single casting vendor.There is a critical need for frequent communications between management and hourly workers during a transition of this magnitude. The hourly workers have less access to information and make interpretations of events based on available information, real or rumored. The hourly workers are dependent on information from management and when events "suddenly" do not occur as expected a negative perception of management results.Many of the hourly workforce responded magnificently to the challenges of moving beyond "pushing buttons" to becoming a thinking and decision-making facet of the organization. Although some hourly workers who had been acculturated at a time when they were "not paid to think" did not respond well to the unsupervised environment, a large number of the workers demonstrated a voraciousness for the opportunity.RecommendationsPrior to initiating a major change in an organization a very detailed and thorough evaluation needs to be conducted of all potential sources of roadblocks to success. This evaluation should include research on organizations who have experienced similar transitions in the past. The planning should include: An assessment of the internal organizational culture.This would include the likelihood of union support even in lieu of a shift in union leadership.An analysis of the costs/benefits of initiating a new product within the existing plant or at a completely new location.A detailed assessment of all vendors with an alternate in case of utilization of one exclusive supplier. A careful assessment of a machine vendor's ability to meet delivery dates and stringent contractual guidelines which would maximize punctual delivery. Prior to initiating the project there needs to be communication and agreement between the organization and corporate headquarters in regards to the specific details of the changes.A thorough research of potential material vendors needs to be conducted in order to ensure a stable vendor who produces a quality product.A careful selection procedure should be developed which enlists individuals who are willing and able to make the transition along with the organization.
43

Faculty integration of computer-mediated learning technologies into teaching praxis

Parchoma, Gale Ann 23 April 2007 (has links)
The purpose of the study was to examine organizational structural, cultural, pedagogical, and economic (reward system) elements of a traditional research-oriented university for influences on faculty adoption of computer-mediated learning technologies (CMLTs). Emergent driving and restraining societal and organizational influences (Lewin, 1951) on faculty members adoption of CMLTs were examined. Faculty members perceptions of the extent to which university policies and practices were aligned to support the successful design, development, and implementation of CMLTs were explored. <p>A case study of faculty members, who had led CMLT development teams in a provincially funded Technology Enhanced Learning (TEL) initiative at one university between 2000 and 2005, was conducted in four stages. In the first stage of the study, focus groups and members checks were held with instructional designers in order to identify potentially information-rich CMLT projects. Findings from this included an examination of the social negotiation process among members of CMLT development teams, and provided the bases for selecting faculty members to invite to participate in the study. Stage Two was a pilot of the faculty interview protocol that resulted in protocol refinement. In Stage Three, seven faculty members and one graduate student participated in interviews and members checks of the results. Faculty members were asked to describe their motivations for adopting CMLTs into teaching praxis, any resultant changes to their scholarship of teaching, the compensation they received for time invested in pedagogical and technological innovation, and the extent to which institutional structures, cultures, and policies had supported or impeded their efforts. Stage Four involved an environmental scan of institutional and provincial documentation of the TEL initiative as an avenue to corroborating interview data.<p>In this study, it was found that faculty motivations for CMLT adoption included individual responses to departmental initiatives, curricular renewal and standardization activities, personal-professional development, integrating research into teaching, enhancing student learning, increasing the flexibility of student access to learning opportunities, and improving communications with students. Participants reported a variety of resultant changes to their scholarship of teaching: (1) a shift away from traditional lectures and toward learner-focused tutorials, small group and peer-to-peer discussions, and independent learning opportunities for students accessing electronic learning resources; (2) a new or renewed interest in using innovative instructional strategies and learning environments; and (3) a new or heightened interest in researching educational effectiveness. Organizational support for CMLT projects included fiscal support from the TEL program, and in some cases, additional funding provided by departments or colleges; project management support from the institution; pedagogical support from instructional designers; technical and aesthetic support from information technologists, media developers, graphic artists, and a medical illustrator. Organizational and cultural impediments to successful completion of projects varied across college settings. Lack of sufficient time to devote to CMLT development projects, balancing competing research, teaching, and administrative responsibilities with project activities, and therefore, coping with a mismatch between tenure and promotion requirements and necessary time commitments to CMLT projects were pervasive. Difficulties in coordinating large development teams, the slow pace of acquiring approvals for new programs, problematic project management models, and colleagues skepticism about and fear of integrating technology into teaching were common themes. <p>This study surfaced implications for organizational change that could better enable faculty efforts to adopt CMLTs. Expanding tenure and promotion criteria to include CMLT development work (Archer, Garrison, & Anderson, 1999; Hagner & Schneebeck, 2001) and revising intellectual property policies for CMLT artifacts to better acknowledge faculty efforts (Hilton & Neal, 2001; Tallman, 2000) could do much to encourage the integration of technology into teaching. Promoting educational effectiveness research studies (Chyung, 2001), and bringing CMLT efforts in from the margins to become a core activity in the scholarship of teaching (Bates, 2001) could erode current skepticism and fear about technologies displacing faculty members (Olcott & Schmidt, 2000). <p>Finally, in this study, theoretical implications for organizational change were posited. Traditional centralized and bureaucratic management styles are not well suited to supporting CMLT initiatives in higher education (Bates, 2001). A more distributed approach to leadership (Knapper, 2006) could better support necessary efforts to innovate, experiment, prototype, evaluate in order to incrementally improve project outcomes (Suter, 2001), create synergies between teaching and research activities, and garner faculty commitment to integrating computer-mediated learning technologies into contemporary teaching praxis.
44

Organizational innovation: the role of top management in different stages of innovation implementation

Davis, Carolyn D. 01 December 2003 (has links)
No description available.
45

Future uncertainty concerns and contingency measures of employees in the situation of business combination

Su, Hsiao-Pei 22 August 2011 (has links)
Abstract Taiwan's financial sector was earlier divided clearly into three sections, namely, banking, securities and insurance, each of which has its own targeted customers without conflict among themselves. Nowadays, however, the financial market has reached certain maturity over years of constant development as dazzling variety of financial products are highly correlated and closely intertwined. Corporate structure based on product classification has long been unable to effectively enhance the operational efficiency of enterprises, out of which financial reform emerges. Financiers, whether their main business involves banking, securities or insurance, are looking to expanding their territory by integrating resources, which evolves into the current financial holding pattern. Hand in hand with financial holding system comes significant change in corporate culture, the impact of which is not inconsiderable for securities. For instance, what traditional securities traders sell is mostly stocks, and for investors great importance is attached to professional analyses and business development interactions. In addition to daily challenges from strong performance pressure, securities traders also have to deal with pressure from investors' potential investment losses. So besides luring bonus incentives they must have devotion and passion for their profession. But within the financial holding system, the focus is comprehensive wealth management, customer resource sharing and joint product marketing; what matters is the overall outcome of financial holding; the goal is not only to make customer satisfied, but more importantly is to improve customer loyalty, because after all it is loyal investors that are the source and guarantee of company's long-term profitability. Constant purchase of the company's products or services is the key to building long-term relationship between the company and investors. However, for securities salespersons, growing diversification of products means more time to learn about unfamiliar products (time-consuming). In the competitive environment, improved service quality does not necessarily equal income increase; on the contrary undercutting is anything but new (small profit margins). And in order to enhance the efficiency of financial holding the establishment of departments such as IT, human resources, performance analysis, is essential, which inevitably will increase operating costs with cut-down on performance-based bonus as well as welfare (low reward). It is thus suggested that the slogan of all-round salesperson is more boastful than practical for primary salespersons on the front line. But how should branch managers how to deal with decline in operation performance caused by salespersons' negative emotions and passive resistance? How can they strike a balance between company operation and requirements for salespersons? How do they find effective management methods to motivate their employees?
46

The research on revolution of family corporation- A Case Study of B Company

Hsu, Chih-Chia 06 June 2012 (has links)
The enterprises running under Family Corporation are common business model all around the world. According to statistics of America, only 30% of family corporate can last its business to 2nd generation, but no more than 15% of companies do survive the transition from the founder to third generation. This indicates family corporation is facing one big dilemma which is business succession planning. Family business succession planning composed two key issues, which are culture and spirit. During succession planning, successfully transition is long-term process rather than one turning point. With family businesses, restructuring organization can be happened and management of leadership can also be changed even injection of ERP. Think of family business succession are broken into five main issues; succession planning, training, coaching, supporting or on his own. Between different capabilities of two generations, each step may be an obstacle for next development of succession planning. Examine the strengths of all possible successors as objectively as possible and think about what is best for the business. Early succession planning also gives successor adequate learning time to learn how to make right decision at right timing. Revolution is rethinking the meaning of self-existing. Family Corporation B starts from setting up specific goal. The transition of the business model from founder to next generation is owner¡¦s philosophy to management system. Opening a dialogue among family members is the best way to begin the process of a successful succession plan. By reorganizing corporation, some staffs may have side effects on new leadership. The new leader has to persuade each one of staff to accept new behavior by using different strategies and methods. Without fully supports of all employees for change, revolution won¡¦t be successful. In terms of the case study, this case shows the planning and design of behavior model how to minimize staff¡¦s resistance under execution of revolution. This is the most important issue to determine whether revolution is successful or not. Furthermore, succession planning in advance is good. The study tells that the longer you get to spend on family business succession planning the smoother the transition process is likely to be. A good succession plan can ensure that you have a good management system and maintain corporate value to keep the business alive and cohesiveness among family members.
47

Behind the scenes, or at least behind your back: hidden conflict during organizational change

Siepel, Jennifer Lynn 15 May 2009 (has links)
Throughout extant literature, there is a great deal of research on organizational change and organizational conflict; however, the two have rarely been studied together. Even less frequently studied is the existence and impact of hidden conflict during an organizational change. This study seeks to explore the meeting of these bodies of literature through the use of qualitative methods. Fifteen interviews were triangulated with artifact data and participant observation to examine hidden conflict during an organizational change in a student organization of a large, southern university. The organization studied had a long history of grassroots student leadership. However, per a directive of university administration, this pattern shifted. In order to comply with the new directive, the student leadership Council of the organization begrudgingly changed their structure. Many organizational members challenged the process taken to implement this change, not only because of the structural alteration it represented, but also for the lack of student input in developing the change plans. This study revealed that throughout the change process, organizational members used hidden conflict strategies extensively. These individuals aimed their hidden conflict behaviors at other organizational members in protest of others’ opinions of the change initiative. The use of hidden conflict behaviors had a significant impact on the change process and the efficacy of the organization as a whole. Most of the hidden conflict behaviors displayed are already identified in extant literature; however, this study also revealed new expressions of hidden conflict. In addition, this research explored the implications of emotion during an organizational change and the link between hidden conflict and resistance.
48

State-owned Banks¡¦ Strategy Development and Organizational change after Privatization -- Case Study on Land Bank of Taiwan

Chen, Yi-ru 20 June 2005 (has links)
In the past decade, the banking industry in Taiwan has faced growing competitions. Since the government announced ¡§the Commercial Bank Establishment Promotion Decree¡¨ with the object of opening up the bank market further in 1991, the deregulation of Taiwan's banking sector and the introduction of new private banks make the bank market more competitive. Moreover, with the approval of ¡§The Financial Institutions Merger Law¡¨ and ¡§The Financial Holding Company Act¡¨ in 2000 and 2001, the Ministry of Finance (MOF) has endeavored to make critical financial reforms to consolidate the financial market, to encourage financial innovation, and to establish a financial management system in accordance with international norms and standards. In addition, some of the state-owned banks are privatized to improve operational efficiency as well as competitive strength in recent years; the banking industry has faced a dramatic change of structure. However, the Land Bank of Taiwan is recommended to privatize at the end of 2006, it remains as a problem how the bank should keep its competitiveness advantages and take reform measures tie in the privatizing process. Firstly, the thesis is going to analyze the changes in both domestic and foreign financial environment, examining the operational condition of The Land Bank of Taiwan, as well as doing literature reviews about privatization, strategy, and organizational change. Then, distribute questionnaires is distributed to managers in the Land Bank of Taiwan; a conference is held with experts in banking and managers in the bank. Finally, the previous information will be integrated to scheme out the ideal suggestions about competitive strategies, business strategies, and organizational change after privatization for the Land Bank of Taiwan as a reference.
49

Intercultural competencies required by organization development consultants

Kothbauer, Teresa R. January 2001 (has links) (PDF)
Thesis--PlanB (M.S.)--University of Wisconsin--Stout, 2001. / Field problem. Includes bibliographical references.
50

Effective military innovation : technological and organizational dimensions /

Marling, Robin N. January 2002 (has links) (PDF)
Thesis (M.S.)--Naval Postgraduate School, 2002. / Thesis advisor(s): John Arquilla, Kenneth Hagan. Includes bibliographical references (p. 81-86). Also available online.

Page generated in 0.9901 seconds