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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
61

Organisational change management :

Ching, Boon Huat. Unknown Date (has links)
This research is designed to explore factors that influence success and failure of organisational change management as perceived by managers in Malaysia. / Thesis (DBA(DoctorateofBusinessAdministration))--University of South Australia, 2004.
62

Against the tide :

Cresshull, Errol Unknown Date (has links)
Thesis (MBus)--University of South Australia, 2000
63

Electronic government in organizational change process : a case study of the Sabah state government

Ajam, Moktar Yassin January 2005 (has links)
The extensive development of change management has offered organizations appropriate strategies, effective approaches and useful concepts to realise the anticipated change. The latest change manifestation that is being given major attention by public organizations is Electronic Government, which is realised through the expansion of Information Technology and the evolution of the Internet. / This research has found that the Electronic Government initiative has affected organisational change, particularly in the areas of Strategy, Structure and People. As a result, the performance of the organization has also improved. Therefore, the Electronic Government initiative has had an impact on organisational performance. The results of this research show that Electronic Government intervenes in and affects these three variables independently or/and collectively. Any change in one variable will influence the others and this change can take place in two ways. A model framework is proposed to illustrate this interdependency of all three variables of Strategy, Structure and People within an organization, and the intervention of Electronic Government. The new theoretical framework could contribute to the overall understanding of the intervention of Electronic Government in the organisational change process and its impact on organizational performance. / Thesis (DBA(DoctorateofBusinessAdministration))--University of South Australia, 2005
64

Bureaucratic politics and organisational reform at the University of Queensland, 1969-1982

Kidston, Robert Keith Unknown Date (has links)
No description available.
65

Bureaucratic politics and organisational reform at the University of Queensland, 1969-1982

Kidston, Robert Keith Unknown Date (has links)
No description available.
66

Bureaucratic politics and organisational reform at the University of Queensland, 1969-1982

Kidston, Robert Keith Unknown Date (has links)
No description available.
67

Bureaucratic politics and organisational reform at the University of Queensland, 1969-1982

Kidston, Robert Keith Unknown Date (has links)
No description available.
68

Renovating midwifery care : the complexity of organisational change for midwives in Victoria, Australia

Gilmour, Carole January 2009 (has links)
The importance of the role of the midwife in providing safe, quality care for women has until recently, been underrated in Victoria, Australia. Acknowledgement of the need for midwife-led models of care in state maternity service policies provided opportunities for midwives to become recognised within the healthcare system and the wider community. This professional doctorate aims to examine the ways in which the role of the midwife and her practice has been impacted on by organisational renovations of midwifery care. It identifies the complexity of the factors that affect the midwife’s ability or choice to work in midwife-led models of care. Furthermore this doctorate highlights the need for ongoing debate into midwifery in Australia. Concepts related to midwifery practice are examined as they form the foundations for the research and policy components of the portfolio. This includes an exploration of midwifery philosophy, the antecedents to autonomous practice and the experience midwives have of midwife-led care. An examination of the concepts of continuity of care and woman-centred care provides a platform upon which to review models of midwifery care. This review highlights the development of an ongoing relationship as a source of satisfaction for midwives and women. The second part of the doctorate reviews policies that guide the provision of maternity services in Victoria. Analysis of these policies using Kingdon’s multiple streams framework identifies the problems, the political actors and the policy developed, establishing the context for organisational change in maternity care. The antecedents for successful integration of organisational change are explored through a review of change theory and leadership. A case study approach utilised for the research component of the doctorate provides insights into organisational change that occurred at two maternity sites in Victoria. The findings of the study suggest there was a dichotomy between those midwives desiring autonomous practice and wanting to work in midwife-led care and those wishing to remain in one specialised area. Recommendations stemming from these findings include the need for sufficient education and support during change, a review of terminology used to describe midwifery models of care and research into the use of integrated maternity units. Complexity science is examined in order to bring the different strands of the doctorate together, providing an explanation for the different outcomes that occur despite the implementation of similar models. The connective leadership model was suggested as the means to provide leadership that is inclusive of providing direction, mentoring new leaders and providing support and opportunities for midwives to become empowered to practice autonomously. Attention to the complexity of organisational change is vital to ensure the future of midwifery.
69

Renovating midwifery care : the complexity of organisational change for midwives in Victoria, Australia

Gilmour, Carole January 2009 (has links)
The importance of the role of the midwife in providing safe, quality care for women has until recently, been underrated in Victoria, Australia. Acknowledgement of the need for midwife-led models of care in state maternity service policies provided opportunities for midwives to become recognised within the healthcare system and the wider community. This professional doctorate aims to examine the ways in which the role of the midwife and her practice has been impacted on by organisational renovations of midwifery care. It identifies the complexity of the factors that affect the midwife’s ability or choice to work in midwife-led models of care. Furthermore this doctorate highlights the need for ongoing debate into midwifery in Australia. Concepts related to midwifery practice are examined as they form the foundations for the research and policy components of the portfolio. This includes an exploration of midwifery philosophy, the antecedents to autonomous practice and the experience midwives have of midwife-led care. An examination of the concepts of continuity of care and woman-centred care provides a platform upon which to review models of midwifery care. This review highlights the development of an ongoing relationship as a source of satisfaction for midwives and women. The second part of the doctorate reviews policies that guide the provision of maternity services in Victoria. Analysis of these policies using Kingdon’s multiple streams framework identifies the problems, the political actors and the policy developed, establishing the context for organisational change in maternity care. The antecedents for successful integration of organisational change are explored through a review of change theory and leadership. A case study approach utilised for the research component of the doctorate provides insights into organisational change that occurred at two maternity sites in Victoria. The findings of the study suggest there was a dichotomy between those midwives desiring autonomous practice and wanting to work in midwife-led care and those wishing to remain in one specialised area. Recommendations stemming from these findings include the need for sufficient education and support during change, a review of terminology used to describe midwifery models of care and research into the use of integrated maternity units. Complexity science is examined in order to bring the different strands of the doctorate together, providing an explanation for the different outcomes that occur despite the implementation of similar models. The connective leadership model was suggested as the means to provide leadership that is inclusive of providing direction, mentoring new leaders and providing support and opportunities for midwives to become empowered to practice autonomously. Attention to the complexity of organisational change is vital to ensure the future of midwifery.
70

Electronic government in organizational change process : a case study of the Sabah state government

Ajam, Moktar Yassin January 2005 (has links)
The extensive development of change management has offered organizations appropriate strategies, effective approaches and useful concepts to realise the anticipated change. The latest change manifestation that is being given major attention by public organizations is Electronic Government, which is realised through the expansion of Information Technology and the evolution of the Internet. / This research has found that the Electronic Government initiative has affected organisational change, particularly in the areas of Strategy, Structure and People. As a result, the performance of the organization has also improved. Therefore, the Electronic Government initiative has had an impact on organisational performance. The results of this research show that Electronic Government intervenes in and affects these three variables independently or/and collectively. Any change in one variable will influence the others and this change can take place in two ways. A model framework is proposed to illustrate this interdependency of all three variables of Strategy, Structure and People within an organization, and the intervention of Electronic Government. The new theoretical framework could contribute to the overall understanding of the intervention of Electronic Government in the organisational change process and its impact on organizational performance. / Thesis (DBA(DoctorateofBusinessAdministration))--University of South Australia, 2005

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