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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
11

The role of oculomotor adjustments in the perception of size

Moore, Donovan Merle. January 1961 (has links)
Thesis (M.S.)--University of Wisconsin--Madison, 1961. / Typescript. eContent provider-neutral record in process. Description based on print version record. Includes bibliographical references (leaf 14).
12

The ontogenetic and microgenetic development of part-whole perception

Shaw, Martin Andrew. January 1900 (has links)
Thesis--Wisconsin. / Vita. Includes bibliographical references (leaves 145-150).
13

Phenomenal size perception

Tronick, Edward Charles, January 1969 (has links)
Thesis (Ph. D.)--University of Wisconsin--Madison, 1969. / Typescript. Vita. Description based on print version record. Includes bibliographical references.
14

Computerized methods and analysis of differential flicker sensitivity

Ting, Theodora Pu-san, January 1973 (has links)
Thesis (Ph. D.)--University of Wisconsin--Madison, 1973. / Typescript. Vita. Description based on print version record. Includes bibliographical references.
15

A study of the changes in size constancy with age in three illumination conditions

Woollard, Eleanore (McClintock) January 1964 (has links)
Thesis (M.A.)--University of Wisconsin--Madison, 1964. / eContent provider-neutral record in process. Description based on print version record. Bibliography: l. 54-56.
16

Comparison of perceptual adaptation to optical tilt and displacement

Redding, Gordon M. January 1972 (has links)
Thesis (Ph. D.)--University of Wisconsin--Madison, 1972. / Typescript. Vita. eContent provider-neutral record in process. Description based on print version record. Includes bibliographical references.
17

Die geistige aneignung eine psychologische analyse ...

Seitz, Franz. January 1906 (has links)
Pr.
18

Asymmetries of the visual space

Takala, Martti. January 1951 (has links)
Issued also as Thesis--Helsingfors. / Includes bibliographical references.
19

Perceived safety from crime in the outdoor environment

Loewen, Laura June January 1991 (has links)
Past research reports a number of environmental characteristics which can influence perceived safety in the outdoor public environment. Appleton's Prospect and Refuge Theory attempts to explain how the environment can affect people's feelings of perceived safety by its offering (or not) of the ability to see without being seen. According to Appleton, it is this ability which is the basis of all other activities and thus a place which offers a view and possible hiding places will be perceived to be attractive because it fulfils survival needs. The purpose of this research was to discover, first, which environmental characteristics people will name as being important when they are not prompted to consider any particular ones, and second, how those characteristics will affect feelings of perceived safety when presented visually and how they might interact with each other. Findings showed that subjects most often mentioned "light", "access to help", and "open space" as contributing to perceived safety in the outdoor environment. These three features can be seen to fit Prospect and Refuge Theory in that light and open space offer a good view and access to help offers unambiguous refuge. When tested in an experimental setting, the three features interact to create a number of possible environments some of which are considered to be safer than others: The situations which contained all three of the features (thus offered a balance of the values of each) were rated as being safer than situations which offered one or two of the features and compromised the other(s) and situations in which none of the three features was represented. Design implications and future research are discussed. / Arts, Faculty of / Psychology, Department of / Graduate
20

Location of clicks in short temporal intervals

Cameron, Norman David January 1971 (has links)
Two experiments examined the ability of subjects to locate clicks occupying various positions in unstructured 2, 4, and 6 sec. intervals of time. In Experiment I, it was found that the effects on the subjective location of the click of the experimental factors of interval filling, interval duration, click position, and daily testing sessions, were to modify underlying response tendencies. The apparent response tendencies were a central tendency and a right bias. Experiment II investigated the hypothesis that the right bias resulted from the subjective association of differential amounts of mental content with the durations preceding and following the click. The results did not support the hypothesis but did suggest that the right bias resulted from the misperception of the location of the click by a constant amount of time regardless of the objective position of the click within the interval. An alternate hypothesis based upon the perception of the click as having an appreciable duration was proposed to account for the right bias. / Arts, Faculty of / Psychology, Department of / Graduate

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