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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
31

An investigation of the effects of melodic perception instruction on the pitch discrimination and vocal accuracy of kindergarten children

Apfelstadt, Hilary Everett. January 1983 (has links)
Thesis (Ph. D.)--University of Wisconsin--Madison, 1983. / Typescript. Vita. eContent provider-neutral record in process. Description based on print version record. Includes bibliographical references (leaves 129-136).
32

The effects of practice on judgments of absolute pitch

Bacon, Evelyn January 1922 (has links)
Published also as Thesis (Ph. D.)--Columbia University, 1922. / "Columbia university contributions to philosophy and psychology."
33

The effect of training in pitch discrmination

Smith, Franklin Orion, January 1900 (has links)
Thesis (Ph. D.)--University of Iowa, 1912. / "Reprinted from Psychological review monograph. no. 69."
34

Correcting linear intonation on the trombone

Palmer, Bradley Everett. Drew, John. January 2005 (has links)
Treatise (D.M.A.) Florida State University, 2005. / Advisor: John Drew, Florida State University, College of Music. Title and description from dissertation home page (viewed 7-11-07). Document formatted into pages; contains 86 pages. Includes biographical sketch. Includes bibliographical references.
35

The kappa effect in pitch/time context

MacKenzie, Noah Aaron, January 2007 (has links)
Thesis (Ph. D.)--Ohio State University, 2007. / Title from first page of PDF file. Includes bibliographical references (p. 117-120).
36

Pitch organization and form in Bartók's sonata for piano (1926)

Kizas, Andrew James January 1999 (has links) (PDF)
No description available.
37

Temporal coding of the periodicity of monaural and binaural complex tones in the guinea pig auditory brainstem

Alsindi, Sami January 2017 (has links)
Humans report a strong pitch percept in response to a complex tone – the sum of a series of harmonics – presented to either a single ear (‘monaurally’) or both ears (‘diotically’). Interspike interval histograms of responses of neurons in the auditory system to monaural complex tones show a peak at the period of the pitch reported by humans – a ‘neural correlate of pitch’. However, the same pitch percept can be generated by presenting complexes with harmonics distributed across both ears (‘dichotically’). This requires combination of the neural signals underlying pitch from both sides of the auditory system, termed ‘binaural fusion’. Temporal coding generally deteriorates along the auditory pathway; binaural fusion should occur at a relatively early stage. One of the prime candidates is in the superior olivary complex (SOC). Although the guinea pig auditory system has been extensively studied, this work is the first in vivo investigation of the guinea pig SOC. Cells of the lateral superior olive (LSO) show sensitivity to interaural level differences; medial superior olive (MSO) cells show sensitivity to interaural time differences. Additionally, cells with responses similar to the medial nucleus of the trapezoid body (MNTB) and superior paraolivary nucleus (SPN) of other species were found in the guinea pig SOC. Presumed MNTB cells showed a three-component spike waveform shape; presumed SPN cells responded at the offset of contralaterally-presented stimuli. MSO and LSO cells respond to the overall pitch of complex tones, even if the monaural waveforms presented to each ear differ; this is consistent with the perception of humans. In contrast, cells of the ventral cochlear nucleus, which provide the main input to MSO and LSO cells, do not show evidence of a binaural pitch response. In conclusion, SOC cells are able to encode the pitch of binaural complex tones in their spike timing patterns.
38

Vocal Pitch-Matching: The Effect of Singing into the Right Ears of Fifth-Grade Students

Watkins, Sharon C. (Sharon Carp) 08 1900 (has links)
This study investigated whether fifth-grade students would sing more accurately when responding to pitch stimuli presented to the right ear as compared to left and both ears. Students were also classified as either strongly right-handed or other (left-handed or mixed) to see if ear treatment responses would differ with handedness. Sixty-six students were tested on their attempts to match 12 model pitches. Identical tests were given to each subject on 3 different days, with a different ear treatment each day. Vocal response scores were significantly better for both-ear presentation than for left-ear. No significant difference was found between right and both ears, right and left ears, or between handedness groups.
39

Pitch learning and the implications for music education

Byrd, Audrey S January 1977 (has links)
A study of pitch learning must outline first the procedures involved in such learning and then identify specific factors appearing to influence the learning of pitch. Once identified, each factor can then be evaluated by controlled experiment before confirming its influence. Since it is what is heard and perceived that is learnt, I have started with the process of Hearing and Perceiving, for as Arnold Abramovitz, Senior Lecturer in Psychology at Cape Town says, “the reception, processing and interpretation of acoustic symbols constitutes some of the most elusive and complex phenomena to attempt to examine, gauge and measure, due partly to the transient, ephemeral nature of sound itself.”
40

Pitch learning and the implications for music education

Byrd, Audrey S January 1977 (has links)
From introduction: A study of pitch learning must outlina first the procedures involved in such learning ar~d then identify specific factors appearing to influence the learning of pitch. Once identified, each factor can then be evaluated by controlled experiment before confirming its influence. Since it is \'lhat is heard and perceived that is learnt, I have started with the process of Hearing and Perceiving, for as Arnold Abramovitz, Senior Lecturer in Psychology at Cape Town says, "the reception, processing and interpretation of acoustic symbols constitutes some of the most elusive and complex phenomena to attempt to examine, gauge and measure, due partly to the transient, ephemeral nature of sound itself."

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