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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
1

An examination of religious plurality in America

Trumbull, Matthew H., January 2004 (has links)
Thesis (M.A.)--Gordon-Conwell Theological Seminary, South Hamilton, MA, 2004. / Abstract and vita. An integrative paper submitted to the Faculty of Gordon-Conwell Theological Seminary in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Arts in Religion. Includes bibliographical references (leaves 41-43).
2

A practical distinction in value theory qualitative and quantitative accounts /

Foresman, Galen A. January 2008 (has links)
Thesis (Ph.D.)--Bowling Green State University, 2008. / Document formatted into pages; contains vii, 127 p. Includes bibliographical references.
3

An examination of religious plurality in America

Trumbull, Matthew H., January 2004 (has links) (PDF)
Thesis (M.A.)--Gordon-Conwell Theological Seminary, South Hamilton, MA, 2004. / Abstract and vita. An integrative paper submitted to the Faculty of Gordon-Conwell Theological Seminary in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Arts in Religion. Includes bibliographical references (leaves 41-43).
4

State, groups and individuals : pluralist thinking in Britain and France (1900-25)

Laborde, Cecile January 1996 (has links)
No description available.
5

Socially inclusive governance? : a comparison of local anti-poverty strategies in the UK and the Netherlands

Beaumont, Justin R. January 2000 (has links)
It is commonplace for intellectuals and political figures to speak of popular involvement in decision-making as an essential basis for a well-functioning and legitimate democracy, while at the same time institutions of liberal democracy are under threat and face crisis in the west. In response a rhetoric of socially inclusive and participatory governance has taken hold as a means for democratic renewal - a 'third-way' between the outmoded dogma of the command state and free market - one that encourages participation of local people in a plurality of non-state organisations in civil society. Rather than banish ailing representative institutions, new perspectives seek to pluralise and radicalise them, particularly as existing socialism continues to decline, carrying with it a mounting impasse within traditional thinking on the Left. Debates on socially inclusive governance and the deep implications for a democratic and plural socialism are pressing, and require critical attention. Research for this thesis deals centrally with the debate on socially inclusive governance by comparing actual mechanisms for popular involvement in local anti-poverty strategies in the UK and the Netherlands. Comparing these issues in North Tyneside and Rotterdam, this research shows that despite novel attempts towards involvement at grassroots level, this ideal is belied by a more restricted reality. Radical democracy requires intervention along an explicit participatory ideology external to the internal logic of governance pluralism. Any project for radical and plural democracy, moreover, needs to be mindful of the nature of the relationship between state and civil society, and retain a normative conception of the 'third-sector'. Despite enduring institutional specificities and contextual path-dependence, a deepening process of international neo-liberalisation has engendered a tendency for welfare regime convergence in the UK and the Netherlands. Certain possibilities exist for policy transfer between these different institutional contexts.
6

The plural society and the problem of order

Bekker, Simon January 1974 (has links)
Pluralism, as a sociological perspective to study multi-ethnic and multi-racial societies, is a popular and well-known approach. It is also an approach which has been repeatedly and effectively criticized. This study focuses upon pluralism and the problem of order in society. Hereby, a new pluralist perspective is developed which avoids the pitfalls of the traditional approach, on the one hand, and yet retains the valid emphasis on pluralism, on the other. By applying this new perspective, it is possible to analyze the changing relationships he tween the cultural (and racial) characteristics in the society, and its structural characteristics. In this way, it is hoped, more may be learnt about the nature of a plural society and about the ways it can change.
7

The religious pluralism of John Hick a critique /

Krisak, Paul E. January 2000 (has links)
Thesis (M.A.)--Liberty University School of Religion, 2000. Thesis (M.A.)--Liberty University, 1990. / Includes bibliographical references.
8

Critical pluralism a new approach to religious diversity /

Konieczka, Matthew P. January 2007 (has links)
Thesis (Ph. D.)--University of Missouri-Columbia, 2007. / The entire dissertation/thesis text is included in the research.pdf file; the official abstract appears in the short.pdf file (which also appears in the research.pdf); a non-technical general description, or public abstract, appears in the public.pdf file. Title from title screen of research.pdf file (viewed on September 27, 2007) Vita. Includes bibliographical references.
9

Educating for pluralism from a Jewish perspective in an Israeli institution of informal education /

Ben-Chorin, Golan. January 2005 (has links)
Thesis (Ed.D.)--Jewish Theological Seminary of America. William Davidson Graduate School of Jewish Education, 2005. / Includes bibliographical references (p. 217-225). Also available on the Internet.
10

The ethic of pluralism in the Qu'rān and the Prophet's Medina /

Miraly, Mohammad N. January 2006 (has links)
This thesis deals with (1) the idea of pluralism in the Qur'an---that humanity's diverse communities are to co-exist and co-operate, and that no single group has a monopoly on 'salvation'; and (2) the practice of pluralism in the Prophet's Medina, wherein different religious groups were part of the ummah, 'community of believers'. This thesis will contend that pluralism is central to the Qur'an's vision for society as cooperative and inclusive, as exemplified in such verses as 2:62, 49:13, and 5:48. The Qur'anic doctrine of pluralism---buttressed by the notion of the commonality of humanity---influenced the Prophet's public policy, especially his actions and relations with other communities. This is seen especially in the 'Constitution of Medina', through which the Prophet aimed to establish a unified 'community of believers' (ummah) that included different religious groups, like Muslims and Jews.

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