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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
1

Masturbation and Relationship Satisfaction

Ramos, Marciana Julia 05 1900 (has links)
Relationship satisfaction often declines after marriage or cohabitation and between 40-50% of marriages end in divorce. Furthermore, many couples who stay together report feeling unsatisfied in their relationships. Thus, it is important to examine factors that contribute to enduring and satisfying relationships. One factor that has been closely linked to relationship satisfaction is the sexual relationship of the couple. One aspect of the sexual relationship that has received little attention is masturbation. Although most psychologists hold positive views about masturbation, and recommend masturbation in many instances, the empirical data examining the association between masturbation and relationship satisfaction has mixed findings, with the majority of studies reporting a small negative relationship between these variables. The purpose of the present study was to further explore the association between masturbation and relationship satisfaction, focusing on possible moderators and mediators of this relationship including: masturbation guilt, openness with an individual's partner about masturbation, gender, object of arousal during masturbation, and reason for masturbating. Overall, masturbation frequency did not have a significant association with relationship satisfaction. However, the object of arousal during masturbation and openness about masturbation moderated the association between masturbation frequency and relationship satisfaction. Specifically, individuals who (a) used objects of arousal other than the partner when masturbating and (b) were less open about the masturbation reported a more negative association between masturbation frequency and relationship satisfaction.
2

Emotion Regulation and Relationship Satisfaction in Clinical Couples

Rick, Jennifer Leigh 27 April 2015 (has links)
This study explored the relationship between the multidimensional construct of emotion regulation and relationship satisfaction in couples seeking couple or family therapy at an outpatient mental health clinic. Recognizing the necessarily interdependent nature of dyadic data, study data were analyzed via path analysis consistent with the Actor-Partner Interdependence Model (APIM; Kenny, Kashy, and Cook, 2006). While overall emotion regulation was not found to be significantly related to relationship satisfaction, results indicated differential effects for the various dimensions of emotion regulation. Perceived access to emotion regulation strategies was significantly positively associated with relationship satisfaction for both men and women. Awareness of emotions was significantly negatively associated with satisfaction for men, with women displaying a trend toward significance, and acceptance of emotions was significantly negatively associated with satisfaction for women, with men displaying a trend toward significance. Women's acceptance of emotions was also significantly negatively associated with her partner's relationship satisfaction, while her ability to control her impulses was significantly positively associated with her partner's satisfaction. No partner effects were found for men's emotion regulation dimensions. Study limitations as well as research and clinical implications are discussed. / Master of Science
3

Relationship satisfaction and mental health of parents of children with autism: A comparison of autism, ADHD, and normative children

Tarabek, Jessica 11 March 2011 (has links)
This research compares the relationship satisfaction and mental health of parents of children diagnosed with Autism or Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) to parents of children with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) or Attention Deficit Disorder (ADD) and parents of normative children. The analytical sample was obtained from the 2007 National Survey of Children's Health, and ANOVA statistical procedures were used to analyze the data. Results indicate that significant differences exist in relationship satisfaction and mental health between mothers of children with Autism or ASD and mothers of either children with ADHD or ADD or normative children. No significant differences were found between fathers. Implications for clinicians working with this population, as well as suggestions for future research are discussed. / Master of Science
4

Relationship satisfaction in dating relationships and same-sex friendships: a comparison and integration of Equity Theory and Attachment Theory

Kito, Mie 08 September 2006 (has links)
Past research has found support for Equity Theory and Attachment Theory in predicting relationship satisfaction. According to Equity Theory, individuals feel satisfied when they are engaged in equitable relationships, where the ratio of benefits to costs is the same across partners. On the other hand, Attachment Theory postulates that a secure attachment style predicts high relationship satisfaction. Although an extensive number of studies have supported these predictions, the present study was the first to compare or integrate Equity Theory and Attachment Theory in predicting relationship satisfaction. A total of 384 introductory psychology students completed questionnaires. Simultaneous multiple regression indicated that partner’s input and the avoidance dimension of attachment were the two largest predictors of relationship satisfaction among overall sample. Hypotheses regarding the relation between equity level and attachment styles were only partially supported. In addition, three proposed models for predicting satisfaction were tested. The first model, based on Equity Theory, showed that underbenefiting exchange orientation, communal orientation, and closeness predicted the level of equity, which in turn led to relationship satisfaction. The second model, based on Attachment Theory, indicated that attachment styles affected the level of self-disclosure leading to intimacy and closeness, which predicted satisfaction. The third model integrated the two theories and showed that attachment styles predicted equity, which influenced the level of self-disclosure. Self-disclosure influenced intimacy and closeness, which led to relationship satisfaction. The integrated model best predicted relationship satisfaction among the three proposed models. Finally, sex differences and differences between friendships and dating relationships were also discussed. / October 2005
5

Marital Communication Behaviour: The Role of Marital Satisfaction, Depressive Symptoms and Proximal Appraisals of Marital Problem-Solving Ability.

Sidhu, Ravinder January 2009 (has links)
According to Bradbury and Fincham’s contextual model of relationship conflict, communication behaviour is likely influenced by relationship factors at both the distal and proximal level. The overall goal of the present study was thus to build on previous research on marital conflict by examining the relations between relevant distal (i.e. marital satisfaction and depressive symptomatology), and proximal relationship variables (i.e. event-dependent expectancies and appraisals), and communication behaviour. Our specific aims were threefold: a) to explore the impact of marital satisfaction and depression on couples’ expectancies for marital problem-solving discussions; b) to examine the effect of such expectancies on actual communication behaviour, after controlling for marital satisfaction and depressive symptoms; and c) to determine whether expectancies and actual communication behaviour influence couples’ post-discussion appraisals, even after controlling for levels of depression and marital satisfaction. A total of 76 married and cohabitating couples across varying levels of marital satisfaction and depression participated in this study. All couples engaged in two marital problem-solving discussions, one in which the husband wanted change and the second in which the wife wanted change. Before engaging in these problem-solving discussions, spouses’ expectancies for resolving the topic of conflict were assessed using both affective and cognitive items. After each discussion ended, participants also rated their cognitive and affective appraisals of the interaction. Results showed that higher levels of marital satisfaction predicted more positive expectancies (both affective and cognitive) for successful communication in the upcoming interactions. Depressive symptoms, however, were only found to impact couples’ feelings in anticipation of the discussions, and not their cognitive expectancies. With regards to actual communication behaviour, after controlling for the effects of marital satisfaction and depressive symptoms, more positive expectations for an upcoming conflict discussion were associated with less negative communication behaviours during the discussion. Spouses’ cognitive post-discussion appraisals of the conflict interactions were positively associated with individuals’ own expectancies going in to these discussions, as well as their partners’ expectancies over and above the effects of depression and marital satisfaction. Finally, actual communication behaviour also influenced appraisals, such that those who spent more time during the conflict discussions engaging in positive behaviours and less time engaging in negative communication behaviours reported greater satisfaction with the discussions. Implications of these results for couples’ therapy are briefly discussed.
6

Marital Communication Behaviour: The Role of Marital Satisfaction, Depressive Symptoms and Proximal Appraisals of Marital Problem-Solving Ability.

Sidhu, Ravinder January 2009 (has links)
According to Bradbury and Fincham’s contextual model of relationship conflict, communication behaviour is likely influenced by relationship factors at both the distal and proximal level. The overall goal of the present study was thus to build on previous research on marital conflict by examining the relations between relevant distal (i.e. marital satisfaction and depressive symptomatology), and proximal relationship variables (i.e. event-dependent expectancies and appraisals), and communication behaviour. Our specific aims were threefold: a) to explore the impact of marital satisfaction and depression on couples’ expectancies for marital problem-solving discussions; b) to examine the effect of such expectancies on actual communication behaviour, after controlling for marital satisfaction and depressive symptoms; and c) to determine whether expectancies and actual communication behaviour influence couples’ post-discussion appraisals, even after controlling for levels of depression and marital satisfaction. A total of 76 married and cohabitating couples across varying levels of marital satisfaction and depression participated in this study. All couples engaged in two marital problem-solving discussions, one in which the husband wanted change and the second in which the wife wanted change. Before engaging in these problem-solving discussions, spouses’ expectancies for resolving the topic of conflict were assessed using both affective and cognitive items. After each discussion ended, participants also rated their cognitive and affective appraisals of the interaction. Results showed that higher levels of marital satisfaction predicted more positive expectancies (both affective and cognitive) for successful communication in the upcoming interactions. Depressive symptoms, however, were only found to impact couples’ feelings in anticipation of the discussions, and not their cognitive expectancies. With regards to actual communication behaviour, after controlling for the effects of marital satisfaction and depressive symptoms, more positive expectations for an upcoming conflict discussion were associated with less negative communication behaviours during the discussion. Spouses’ cognitive post-discussion appraisals of the conflict interactions were positively associated with individuals’ own expectancies going in to these discussions, as well as their partners’ expectancies over and above the effects of depression and marital satisfaction. Finally, actual communication behaviour also influenced appraisals, such that those who spent more time during the conflict discussions engaging in positive behaviours and less time engaging in negative communication behaviours reported greater satisfaction with the discussions. Implications of these results for couples’ therapy are briefly discussed.
7

Relationship satisfaction in dating relationships and same-sex friendships: a comparison and integration of Equity Theory and Attachment Theory

Kito, Mie 08 September 2006 (has links)
Past research has found support for Equity Theory and Attachment Theory in predicting relationship satisfaction. According to Equity Theory, individuals feel satisfied when they are engaged in equitable relationships, where the ratio of benefits to costs is the same across partners. On the other hand, Attachment Theory postulates that a secure attachment style predicts high relationship satisfaction. Although an extensive number of studies have supported these predictions, the present study was the first to compare or integrate Equity Theory and Attachment Theory in predicting relationship satisfaction. A total of 384 introductory psychology students completed questionnaires. Simultaneous multiple regression indicated that partner’s input and the avoidance dimension of attachment were the two largest predictors of relationship satisfaction among overall sample. Hypotheses regarding the relation between equity level and attachment styles were only partially supported. In addition, three proposed models for predicting satisfaction were tested. The first model, based on Equity Theory, showed that underbenefiting exchange orientation, communal orientation, and closeness predicted the level of equity, which in turn led to relationship satisfaction. The second model, based on Attachment Theory, indicated that attachment styles affected the level of self-disclosure leading to intimacy and closeness, which predicted satisfaction. The third model integrated the two theories and showed that attachment styles predicted equity, which influenced the level of self-disclosure. Self-disclosure influenced intimacy and closeness, which led to relationship satisfaction. The integrated model best predicted relationship satisfaction among the three proposed models. Finally, sex differences and differences between friendships and dating relationships were also discussed.
8

Relationship satisfaction in dating relationships and same-sex friendships: a comparison and integration of Equity Theory and Attachment Theory

Kito, Mie 08 September 2006 (has links)
Past research has found support for Equity Theory and Attachment Theory in predicting relationship satisfaction. According to Equity Theory, individuals feel satisfied when they are engaged in equitable relationships, where the ratio of benefits to costs is the same across partners. On the other hand, Attachment Theory postulates that a secure attachment style predicts high relationship satisfaction. Although an extensive number of studies have supported these predictions, the present study was the first to compare or integrate Equity Theory and Attachment Theory in predicting relationship satisfaction. A total of 384 introductory psychology students completed questionnaires. Simultaneous multiple regression indicated that partner’s input and the avoidance dimension of attachment were the two largest predictors of relationship satisfaction among overall sample. Hypotheses regarding the relation between equity level and attachment styles were only partially supported. In addition, three proposed models for predicting satisfaction were tested. The first model, based on Equity Theory, showed that underbenefiting exchange orientation, communal orientation, and closeness predicted the level of equity, which in turn led to relationship satisfaction. The second model, based on Attachment Theory, indicated that attachment styles affected the level of self-disclosure leading to intimacy and closeness, which predicted satisfaction. The third model integrated the two theories and showed that attachment styles predicted equity, which influenced the level of self-disclosure. Self-disclosure influenced intimacy and closeness, which led to relationship satisfaction. The integrated model best predicted relationship satisfaction among the three proposed models. Finally, sex differences and differences between friendships and dating relationships were also discussed.
9

Idealization, Intimate Partner Violence, and Relationship Satisfaction

January 2018 (has links)
abstract: Research has demonstrated that intimate partner violence (IPV) plays an important role in relationship satisfaction. Consistently, the research has indicated a negative association between the prevalence of IPV and relationship satisfaction (Cano & Vivian, 2003; Hotaling & Sugarman, 1990; Vivian & Langhrinrichsen-Rohling, 1994); however, more recent research has provided evidence of higher relationship satisfaction when IPV is present (Frieze, 2005; Hamby & Gray-Little, 2000; Williams & Frieze, 2005). There has been less emphasis placed on uncovering possible explanations for this inconsistency. Some researchers have suggested that victims find ways to rationalize their offender's behavior (Ackerman & Field, 2011), do not consider themselves victims of violence (Hamby & Gray-Little, 2000), or even fail to identify physical violence as IPV (Ferraro & Johnson, 1983) in order to maintain their desire to feel satisfied in their relationship. There is a need for additional research to understand why an individual might report higher relationship satisfaction when IPV is present in her/his intimate relationship and attempt to uncover underlying, contributing factors of IPV. This study sought understanding of the potential mediating role that idealization, the overly positive illusions of a partner or the intimate relationship (Murray, Holmes, & Griffin, 1996a; 1996b), may play on the association between IPV and relationship satisfaction. Additionally, gender was examined as a potential moderator between the predictor and outcome variables as IPV research has consistently documented the need for greater gender symmetry within this topic. One hundred and fifty-two adults (75 males and 77 females) who were currently involved in an intimate relationship (e.g., dating, engaged, married) or had been within the past 12-months completed a survey that assessed IPV, idealization, and relationship satisfaction. Three types of IPV were measured for the purposes of this study (i.e., psychological aggression, physical assault, and sexual coercion), and each was analyzed separately. Results indicated that idealization served as a mediating variable in the relationship between IPV and relationship satisfaction for all three types of IPV. Gender was not found to moderate the relationships for any of the three types of IPV and relationship satisfaction. Limitations, implications, and future research are discussed. / Dissertation/Thesis / Doctoral Dissertation Counseling Psychology 2018
10

Bisexual Relationships: Investigating the Impact of Attitudes Regarding Bisexuality on  Relationship Satisfaction Among Female Same-Gender Couples

Nedela, Mary Rachel 30 January 2020 (has links)
Bisexual individuals experience negativity toward their identities from heterosexual as well as gay and lesbian individuals. While there is a large body of research on the negative mental health consequences due to bi-negativity among individuals who identify as bisexual, little research exists exploring the relational impacts of bi-negativity. Informed by symbolic interaction theory and minority stress theory, this study investigated the impacts of attitudes regarding bisexuality on relationship satisfaction in female same-gender couples with at least one bisexual-identified individual through the following research questions: (a) How, if at all, do the attitudes toward bisexuality of individual partners influence perceptions of relationship satisfaction? and (b) How do partners negotiate the influence of attitudes toward bisexuality on their relationship? To address these questions, data from semi-structured interviews of eight female same-gender couples were analyzed using constructivist grounded theory methodology. Findings indicated that couples moved through a process of the following: pre-relationship factors, relationship formation, relational emotion work, and shared relational meaning. Couples additionally are influenced in each phase of the process by macrosystemic oppressions. Clinical implications to assist mental health professionals better serve these couples were determined. / Doctor of Philosophy / Bisexual individuals experience negativity toward their identities from heterosexual as well as gay and lesbian individuals. While there is a large body of research on the negative mental health consequences due to bi-negativity among individuals who identify as bisexual, more research is need on the relational impacts of bi-negativity. Informed by symbolic interaction theory and minority stress theory, this study investigated the impact of attitudes regarding bisexuality on relationship satisfaction in female same-gender couples with at least one bisexual-identified individual. Eight couples were interviewed, and data was analyzed using constructivist grounded theory methodology. Findings indicated that couples moved through a process of the following: pre-relationship factors, relationship formation, relational emotion work, and shared relational meaning. Couples additionally are influenced in each phase of the process by macrosystemic oppressions. Clinical implications to assist mental health professionals better serve these couples were determined.

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