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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
1

Creature comfort: anthropomorphism, sexuality and revitalization in the furry fandom

Morgan, Matt 03 May 2008 (has links)
This paper attempts to describe and analyze the culture of the furry fandom within the context of anthropologist Anthony Wallace’s model of cultural revitalization movements. This paper argues that the furry fandom represents a modern, subcultural revitalization movement in which values, identity, and sexuality are transformed through the mechanism of zoomorphic symbolism. Over one-hundred interviewees were formally and/or informally interviewed during the course of this study. Interviewees generally expressed a deep affinity for childhood and a negative perspective on adolescent culture. This paper argues that the transformation of identity present in the furry fandom is based on a synthesis of idealized concepts of childhood culture and reactions to negative-self images developed during adolescence. This revitalization process is most evident in the sexual practices of many furries. Rather than a conglomeration of fetishes, the sexual practices of the fandom represent an attempt to redefine individuals’ "mazeways" through the merging of childhood iconography with sexual empowerment and other traits desired by interviewees.
2

The different urban efforts to revitalize urban neighborhoods in the United States and the United Kingdom: comparative case study based on governmental responses focusing on urban neighborhood revitalization

Ko, Youngho 10 October 2008 (has links)
Many US inner cities that had once experienced enormous growth have suffered decline in physical, social, and economic respects. This experience has been limited not only to US urban areas but is also apparent in many UK cities. Because the forces of urban decline have been similar in both cases, so have efforts to address their consequences. Urban policies in each country were implemented to regenerate (UK) or revitalize (US) inner city areas and neighborhoods. This study focuses on one aspect of urban regeneration/revitalization. Change in housing characteristics is a key indicator of decline in inner cities, and captures many of the social, economic and physical aspects of decline. By examining changes in housing characteristics, as well as contextual variables such as poverty, income, and unemployment, this paper examines differences in policy approaches to reversing urban decline. A comparative case study of neighborhoods in representative urban areas in each country using secondary qualitative and quantitative data provides evidence of how each country's approach resulted in changes to the neighborhood's housing and social characteristics. Interpreting these changes leads to conclusions and implications for current and future policies in each country.
3

Culture is lived, language gives it life

Brown, Joan 24 August 2016 (has links)
The overall goal of this paper is to explore the various learning strategies of our Ancestors with one purpose in mind, to find a way to strengthen our hul’q’umi’num’ revitalization efforts. Particularly, the research considers hul’q’umi’num’ in the context of a much larger system, that is, its relationship to the land, the culture and its people. It is my idea that studying language within this cultural context and relating language recovery strategies to canoe ceremonial practices and experiences will reveal a preferred Coast Salish learning sequence, necessary values and the essential attitudes required for reclaiming an Indigenous language. In essence, it will teach us how to live and learn from a supernatural being like hul’q’umi’num’. What I have come to realize is that this canoe learning model, a gift from the Elders, has been left to help us understand that learning progresses through a sacred process that is reliant on two domains. To be exact our learning model is entrenched in two separate but mutually supporting worlds; a spiritual world and a physical world. I argue that defining these unique learning techniques will reveal a natural learning sequence and a natural learning framework that ultimately, will assist language teachers in developing lessons from a Coast Salish perspective. / Graduate
4

Lampung Language Revitalization Program Evaluation

Putra, Kristian Adi 24 February 2016 (has links)
Poster exhibited at GPSC Student Showcase, February 24th, 2016, University of Arizona. / This project was aimed at evaluating the implementation of Lampung language revitalization program in educational settings in Indonesia. The result of this project was used as input for the improvement of the design of the program and for the formulation of language planning and policies that could effectively support the success of the program. Lampung language is an indigenous language primarily spoken in the Province of Lampung, Indonesia. The language has two dialects: Lampung Api and Lampung Nyo. In 2000, Lampung Api had 827,000 speakers, and Lampung Nyo had 180,000 speakers (Lewis, et.al, 2015). In spite of these figures, native Lampung ethnics under 20 years old commonly do not speak the language anymore both at home and outside, as they prefer speaking in Indonesian. Gunarwan (1994) even predicted that in 75 – 100 years, the language could be extinct. Since 1997, the language has been taught for 2 hours a week in grade 1 – 12. However, the result has never been evaluated, although the trend of diglossia remains strong and more massive. This study, then, tried to fill this gap.
5

Yanatame Nisa Luhchi Yoroni: Lexicography, Language Revitalization, and the new Tunica Dictionary

January 2017 (has links)
acase@tulane.edu / Dictionaries play a unique role in the popular imagination of modern American English speakers; monolingual English dictionaries have the final say in language and are the gatekeepers between “good” language and “bad.” The supreme authority of dictionaries can lend authenticity and legitimacy to Native American languages undergoing revitalization. But revitalization dictionaries are more than just an authority on the language. Revitalization dictionaries can expand language use, legitimize neologisms and chronicle cultural practices associated with certain terminology. However, dictionaries do not appear from thin air, and many decisions made during compilation in regards to everything from content to format have lasting impact on the effectiveness and usability of a revitalization dictionary and on the way in which the language in general is used or valued. This dissertation describes the process of compiling the New Tunica Dictionary. It looks at the social legacy of dictionaries in English-speaking society and discusses the ways in which the authority ascribed to dictionaries is leveraged in Tunica language revitalization. The challenges inherent in revitalizing and codifying a once-sleeping language are explored, such as how ambiguities of meaning were resolved when choosing dictionary headwords. It outlines basic Tunica grammar and the ways in which the Tunica Language Project leverages grammar rules in the creation of neologisms for inclusion in the dictionary. It describes the lexicographic underpinnings of the New Tunica Dictionary and details the technical and practical decisions the author undertook as the primary lexicographer. Sample pages of the print and app versions of the dictionary are given. Finally, as a work grounded in community-engaged scholarship, this dissertation discusses the ways in which the process of dictionary compilation encouraged learner excitement and involvement in the overall revitalization project. The dictionary produced in conjunction with this dissertation is intended to be a resource for scholars, language activists, and Tunica language learners for generations to come. / 1 / Patricia Anderson
6

none

Liao, Ying-Shyan 22 July 2002 (has links)
none
7

Bringing the magic back to the Magic City: An examination of the factors responsible for Birmingham's downtown revitalization

January 2015 (has links)
1 / SPK / archives@tulane.edu
8

ARCHITECTURE FOR THE REVITALIZATION OF COMMUNITY

Riley, Erin 29 August 2014 (has links)
While human society has changed a great deal through time, our need for community has remained prevalent. Architecture is a reflection of this need for community in its ability to gather people together by its definition of space, even in that of the basic plane of the public plaza. Though there are many factors to creating a sense of community, architecture and the manipulation of our environment can act as a tool for drawing people together and encouraging interaction between them. The community of Holyoke was at one time a thriving industrial community in the 1900’s. With the passage of time, the mills have closed and industry has sharply declined, leading to an economic shift and the struggle for a new community identity. In addition, there has been a shift in the ethnic groups residing in the area. At its beginning, Holyoke was comprised of mostly Irish and French Canadian residents. Today, the composition of the city is almost 50% Latino. The challenge will be designing the built environment in a way that will create spaces to accommodate a new community, while allowing the existing community to flourish.
9

the Creative Destruction of Hamilton: a Cultural approach to the Urban Regeneration of a City in Economic Transition

Kisielewski, Mariusz January 2011 (has links)
Charles Darwin proclaimed, “It is not the strongest of the species that survives, nor the most intelligent that survives. It is the one that is the most adaptable to change”. At the time, he probably did not fathom the relevance of his statement to the economy of cities. As the manufacturing sector dissipates, industrial cities strive to adapt by diversifying their local economy. This research provides a narrative of Hamilton’s industrial development and its transformation in search of a new identity. It examines the city’s economical, social and physical decay and its current urban regeneration that is based on the re-appropriation of its cultural landscape. This thesis argues that when cities focus only on the economic dimension of development, it may have an adverse influence on their inherent cultural identity which serves to undermine their ability to adapt and diversify. For Hamilton, a case in point is urban transformation of James Street North in a city that was recently subject to decades of neglect. James Street North has become the centre of a bourgeoning arts scene that is beginning to revitalize its neighbourhood. The thesis proposes the adaptive re-use of a deteriorated yet historically significant urban block within the area. The design intervention advocates an urban intensification intended to materialize a social and aesthetic identity derived from the urban agendas of Jane Jacobs, Charles Landry, and Sharon Zukin. The design synthesis proposes to establish a ‘creative milieu’ that becomes a catalyst for social cohesion, sustainable regeneration and an incubator for creativity. The design strategy consists of a hybrid building typology that is able to intensify diversity, exhibit creativity and engage dialogue among its occupants.
10

the Creative Destruction of Hamilton: a Cultural approach to the Urban Regeneration of a City in Economic Transition

Kisielewski, Mariusz January 2011 (has links)
Charles Darwin proclaimed, “It is not the strongest of the species that survives, nor the most intelligent that survives. It is the one that is the most adaptable to change”. At the time, he probably did not fathom the relevance of his statement to the economy of cities. As the manufacturing sector dissipates, industrial cities strive to adapt by diversifying their local economy. This research provides a narrative of Hamilton’s industrial development and its transformation in search of a new identity. It examines the city’s economical, social and physical decay and its current urban regeneration that is based on the re-appropriation of its cultural landscape. This thesis argues that when cities focus only on the economic dimension of development, it may have an adverse influence on their inherent cultural identity which serves to undermine their ability to adapt and diversify. For Hamilton, a case in point is urban transformation of James Street North in a city that was recently subject to decades of neglect. James Street North has become the centre of a bourgeoning arts scene that is beginning to revitalize its neighbourhood. The thesis proposes the adaptive re-use of a deteriorated yet historically significant urban block within the area. The design intervention advocates an urban intensification intended to materialize a social and aesthetic identity derived from the urban agendas of Jane Jacobs, Charles Landry, and Sharon Zukin. The design synthesis proposes to establish a ‘creative milieu’ that becomes a catalyst for social cohesion, sustainable regeneration and an incubator for creativity. The design strategy consists of a hybrid building typology that is able to intensify diversity, exhibit creativity and engage dialogue among its occupants.

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