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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
61

Two-phase pressure drop: a literature survey and correlation analysis

Caughron, Raymond D. January 1967 (has links)
Call number: LD2668 .R4 1967 C33
62

Post critical heat flux heat transfer.

Ganić, Ejup N January 1976 (has links)
Thesis. 1976. Sc.D.--Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Dept. of Mechanical Engineering. / Microfiche copy available in Archives and Engineering. / Vita. / Bibliography: leaves 122-128. / Sc.D.
63

The Effect of Randomly Varying Added Mass on the Dynamics of a Flexible Cylinder in Two-Phase Axially Flowing Fluid

Klein, Christophe 10 1900 (has links)
No description available.
64

The effect of randomly varying added mass on the dynamics of a flexible cylinder in two-phase axially flowing fluid /

Klein, Christophe. January 1981 (has links)
No description available.
65

Response of a slotted plate flow meter to horizontal two phase flow

Muralidharan, Vasanth 17 February 2005 (has links)
The slotted plate flow meter has been widely tested as an obstruction flow meter during the past several years. It has been tested for both single-phase flows as well as for two-phase flows. Previous studies have revealed that the slotted plate flow meter is always better in performance and accuracy than the standard orifice plate flow meter. This study is primarily based on how a slotted plate responds to horizontal two-phase flow with air and water being used as the working fluids. The plates under consideration are those with beta ratios of 0.43 and 0.467. Experiments have been performed with six different configurations of the slotted plate test sections. The performances of the slotted plate flow meters will be compared to that of a standard orifice plate flow meter and then with a venturi. The effects of varying the upstream quality of the two-phase flow on the differential pressure and the coefficient of discharge of the slotted plates, the standard orifice plate and the venturi will be evaluated. Response characteristics at low differential pressures will be investigated. Tests for repeatability will be performed by studying the effects of the gas Reynolds number and the upstream quality on the differential pressure. The differential pressures across the slotted plates, the standard orifice plate and the venturi will be compared. Reproducibility will be evaluated by comparing the data obtained from all six different configurations. One of the main objectives of this study is to arrive at the best suitable procedure for accurately measuring the flow rate of two-phase flow using the slotted plate flow meter.
66

A Study of Intermittent Buoyancy Induced Flow Phenomena in CANDU Fuel Channels

Karchev, Zheko 12 February 2010 (has links)
The present work focuses on the study of two-phase flow behavior called “Intermittent Buoyancy Induced Flow” (IBIF) resulting from the loss of coolant circulation in a CANDU nuclear reactor core. The main objectives are to study steam bubble formation and migration through the pressure tube and into the feeder tubes and headers, and to study the effect of pressure tube sagging on the two-phase flow behavior during IBIF. Experiments are conducted using air and water flow at atmospheric pressure to qualitatively examine the IBIF phenomena. The test showed oscillating periodic behavior in the void fraction as the air vents. In addition to this, a mathematical model based on a simplified momentum balance for the liquid and gas phases was formulated. The model was further solved and compared to the experimental data. The model predictions showed a reasonable agreement within the investigated range of void fractions.
67

A Study of Intermittent Buoyancy Induced Flow Phenomena in CANDU Fuel Channels

Karchev, Zheko 12 February 2010 (has links)
The present work focuses on the study of two-phase flow behavior called “Intermittent Buoyancy Induced Flow” (IBIF) resulting from the loss of coolant circulation in a CANDU nuclear reactor core. The main objectives are to study steam bubble formation and migration through the pressure tube and into the feeder tubes and headers, and to study the effect of pressure tube sagging on the two-phase flow behavior during IBIF. Experiments are conducted using air and water flow at atmospheric pressure to qualitatively examine the IBIF phenomena. The test showed oscillating periodic behavior in the void fraction as the air vents. In addition to this, a mathematical model based on a simplified momentum balance for the liquid and gas phases was formulated. The model was further solved and compared to the experimental data. The model predictions showed a reasonable agreement within the investigated range of void fractions.
68

An experimental investigation into the correlation between Acoustic Emission (AE) and bubble dynamics

Husin, Shuib 08 1900 (has links)
Bubble and cavitation effects phenomena can be encountered in two-phase gas-liquid systems in industry. In certain industries, particularly high-risk systems such as a nuclear reactor/plant, the detection of bubble dynamics, and the monitoring and measurement of their characteristics are necessary in controlling temperature. While in the petro-chemical engineering industry, such as oil transportation pipelines, the detection and monitoring of bubbles/cavitation phenomena are necessary to minimise surface erosion in fluid carrying components or downstream facilities. The high sensitivity of Acoustic Emission (AE) technology is feasible for the detection and monitoring of bubble phenomena in a two phase gas-liquid system and is practical for application within the industry. Underwater measurement of bubble oscillations has been widely studied using hydrophones and employing acoustic techniques in the audible range. However, the application of Acoustic Emission (AE) technology to monitor bubble size has hitherto not been attempted. This thesis presents an experimental investigation aimed at exploring AEs from gas bubble formation, motion and destruction. AE in this particular investigation covers the frequency range of between 100 kHz to 1000 kHz. The AE waveform analysis showed that the AE parameter from single bubble inception and burst events, i.e. AE amplitude, AE duration and AE energy, increased with the increase of bubble size and liquid viscosity. This finding significantly extends the potential use of AE technology for detecting the presence of bubbles in two-phase flow. It is concluded that bubble activity can be detected and monitored by AE technology both intrusively and non-intrusively. Furthermore, the bubble size can be determined by measurement of the AE and this forms the significant contribution of this thesis.
69

Long Term Two-Phase Flow Analysis of the Deep Low Permeability Rock at the Bruce DGR Site

Guo, Huiquan 25 April 2011 (has links)
Abnormal pressures have been measured in the deep boreholes at the Bruce site, southern Ontario, where a deep geologic repository for low and intermediate level radioactive waste disposal has been proposed. The pressure regime in the stratigraphic units exhibits either higher than hydrostatic pressure (over-pressured) or lower than hydrostatic pressure (under-pressured) are considered to be abnormal. At the Bruce site, the Ordovician sediments are under-pressured while the underlying Cambrian sandstone and the overlying Guelph carbonate are over-pressured. Hypotheses have been documented in literature to explain the phenomenon of abnormal pressures. These hypotheses include osmosis, glacial loading and deglaciation unloading, exhumation of overlying sediments, crustal flexure and the presence of an immiscible gas phase. Previous work on the Bruce site has shown that the under-pressures in the Ordovician limestone and shales could not be explained by glaciation and deglaciation or by saturated analyses. The presence of a gas phase in the Ordovician formations has been determined to be a reasonable cause of the under-pressure developed in the Ordovician shales and limestones at the Bruce site. Support for the presence of a gas phase includes solution concentrations of methane, concentrations of environmental isotopes related to methane and estimates of water and gas saturations from laboratory core analyses. The primary contribution of this thesis is the sensitivity analyses performed on the hydrogeologic parameters with respect to a one dimensional two-phase flow model. First, a one dimensional two-phase air and water flow model was adopted and reconstructed to simulate the long-term evolution of the groundwater regimes at the DGR site. Then the hydrogeologic parameters which impact the presence of under-pressure in the groundwater are investigated. Data required to quantify the properties of geologic media and groundwater are adopted directly from borehole testing and laboratory testing results. The permeable boundaries of the domain are assumed to be water saturated and pressure specified (using hydrostatic conditions in the Guelph Formation and hydrostatic with 120 m over-pressure condition in the Cambrian and Precambrian). Isothermal conditions were assumed, thus constant water density and viscosity values are estimated for the average total dissolved solids (TDS) concentration of the modelled stratigraphic column. A constant diffusion coefficient (a diffusivity of $0.25\times10^{-8}$ m$^2$/s) of air in water is assumed with a saturation-dependent tortuosity. The air generation rate is assumed to simulate the gas phase generated in the Ordovician formations. The numerical simulation of up to 4 million years provides a means to explore the behaviour of gas phase dissipation due to partitioning into the water phase and diffusive transport in the solute phase. Results confirmed that the presence of a gas phase would result in the under-pressure in water.
70

Reduced gravity rankine cycle design and optimization with passive vortex phase separation

Supak, Kevin Robert 15 May 2009 (has links)
Liquid-metal Rankine power conversion systems (PCS) coupled with a fission reactor remain an attractive option for space power applications because system specific power and efficiency is very favorable for plant designs of 100 kW(e) or higher. Potential drawbacks to the technology in a reduced gravity environment include two-phase fluid management processes such as liquid-vapor phase separation. The most critical location for phase separation is at the boiler exit where only vapor must be sent to the turbine because blade erosion occurs from high velocity liquid droplets entrained by vapor flow. Previous studies have proposed that rotary separators be used to separate the liquid and vapor from a two phase mixture. However these devices have complex turbo machinery, require kilowatts of power and are untested for high vapor flow conditions. The Interphase Transport Phenomena (ITP) laboratory has developed a low-power, passive microgravity vortex phase separator (MVS) which has already proven to be an essential component of two-phase systems operating in low gravity environments. This thesis presents results from flight experiments where a Rankine cycle was operated in a reduced gravity environment for the first time by utilizing the MVS for liquid and vapor phase separation. The MVS was able to operate under saturated conditions and adjust to system transients as it would in the Rankine cycle by controlling the amount of liquid and vapor within the device. A new model is developed for the MVS to predict separation performance at high vapor flow conditions for sizing the separator at the boiler, condenser, and turbine locations within the cycle by using a volume limiting method. This model factors in the following separator characteristics: mass, pumping power, and available buffer volume for system transients. The study is concluded with overall Rankine efficiency and performance changes due to adding vortex phase separation and a schematic of the Rankine cycle with the integration of the MVS is presented. The results from this thesis indicate the thermal to electric efficiency and specific mass of the cycle can be improved by using the MVS to separate the two phases instead of a rotary separator.

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