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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
41

GRAAPHS: graphic representations of abstract and altruistic phenomenological hymns and stories

Volk, Mitchell James 01 May 2019 (has links)
No description available.
42

Double bind: splitting identity and the body as an object

Ishii, Kotoe January 2009 (has links)
Double Bind: Splitting identity and the body as an object is a research project consisting of studio-based practice presented mainly in video installation format. This work looks at hysterical symptoms as a performance of a body’s split identity. The project draws on the Lacanian theory of Mirror Stage which proposes that the self experienced by the subject, and the image of that self (represented in a mirror-like reflection, or an image) are different to each other, and the development of self-awareness as misrecognition of one’s self. As a conspicuous example of split body, Chapter One describes how the hysterical body, in clinical and artistic representation, is dissociated into multiple selves. In Chapter Two, I discuss some examples of contemporary performance artists who use themselves as subjects, but whose bodies become objects that do not portray the self. In the final chapter I explain how, in my video work, I objectify my own body and how I assess whether this is a mode of self-portraiture. / During the course of this research, I studied a wide range of medical resources and psychoanalytical literature, much of which employed visual illustration and documentation. For example, I have drawn inspiration from Jean-Martin Charcot’s photographic documents of female hysterics whom he treated as patients at the French hospital of La Salpêtrière in the late 19th century; in particular the figure of his most famous patient, known as Augustine. My research also involved studio-based investigation, such as experimentations with the performance of my own body in video format, and the contextual study of artistic and critical texts relating to contemporary media art. / The aim of this research is to demonstrate the ways in which my video performances split the body, creating an Other within one body that can be compared with the hysterical body of a patient, like Augustine, performing for her doctor. In this condition, I perform as the subject and the object of the gaze at the same time. My self-portrait is split in this way: it creates a body double, which I misrecognise as myself. But in doing so, I am both the director and the performer of the image. This is the double bind that my video work puts me into.
43

Dossier : truth /

Bogdanovska, Jasna. January 2007 (has links)
Thesis (M.F.A.)--Rochester Institute of Technology, 2007. / Typescript. Includes bibliographical references (leaves 45-46).
44

Visitor interaction with video art

Neumann, Sara Tess 28 February 2013 (has links)
The purpose of this study was to see how visitors to the Landmarks Video media station in the Art Building at The University of Texas at Austin described how they make meaning while watching video art and what learning models those visitors drew on in their responses. I conducted a qualitative case study using semi-structured interviews to see how visitors described their meaning making process. I used discourse analysis to compare the visitor’s responses to art and film theories to see where the responses and the existing theories overlapped. I applied the results of the discourse analysis to determine how visual literacy and media literacy could be used in museum education surrounding video art. Visitors drew on a variety of background experiences in their responses to the videos Sigalit Landau’s DeadSee (2005) and Dara Birnbaum’s Technology/Transformation: Wonder Woman (1978-1979) including past experiences with art and film as well as experiences with feminism, pop culture, and politics. Their responses also related to a variety of areas within art and film theory. While background knowledge helped the participants begin to make meaning with the videos, it also blocked them when the video touched on something beyond their comfort level. I researched current uses of visual literacy, including uses in the museum, and current trends in media literacy. Due to the fact that the visitors’ reactions related to art and film theory, but they were finding themselves blocked in their meaning making, I conclude that a museum education program that uses current museum education practices in visual literacy, but incorporates techniques from media literacy, would be successful in helping visitors articulate their interpretations of a piece of video art and move past what is limiting them. / text
45

Dokumentinis eksperimentinis filmas / Documentary/ experimental film

Žadeikytė, Asta 03 September 2010 (has links)
Diplominiame darbe „Eksperimentinis dokumentinis filmas“, nagrinėjama kaip dokumentinis kino žanras, perteikia realybę ekrane, kiek tiksliai ir nuosekliai dokumentiniai filmai sugeba fiksuoti realų gyvenimą. Dokumentinio žanro pakilimas, prasidėjo nuo XXI a. ir žengė koja kojon su dokumentalumo stiprėjimu šiuolaikiniame mene. Tai nurodo bendrumą tarp videomeno ir dokumentinio kino žanro. Menininkai norėdami išplėsti dokumentinio kino reprezentacijos rėmus pradėjo eksperimentuotu su dokumentinio kino raiška. Eksperimentai videomene ir dokumentiniame kine prasideda nuo bendro pagrindo – dokumentinio kino kalbos. Videomeninkai naudodami dokumentinio kino kalbas, sukuria realistinę atmosferą savo filmuose, eksperimentuodami menininkai nori pasakyti, kad ne tik standartinė dokumentinio kino raiška gali atspindėti realybę. Dokumentiniame videomene eksperimentės strategijos yra dokumentalumo sampratos laužymas ir kvestionavimas. Diplominiame darbe siekiama išanalizuoti videomeninkų eksperimentus su dokumentinio kino kalba ir kaip baigiamą rezultatą sukuti eksperimentinį dokumentinį filmą apie emigrantę iš Lietuvos. / Work "Experimental documentary film", examines how the documentary film genre, record and represent the reality on the screen, as an objective documentary shots may reflect real life. Strengthening of a documentary genre that began in the twenty-first century, entered and was held in conjunction with documentary brightening discourse in contemporary art. It encourages the consideration of video art and documentary genres in close contact. While artists can‘t fit representation in documentary film frames, experiment with the documentary film resolution and try to expand. Experimental video art and documentary cinema took off from the same ground - a documentary film language, it has become a constant of real representation on the screen. Video artists taking over the documentary film strategies, wants to create a realistic atmosphere of his films, with experiments artists wants to update the definition of documentary, through an extraordinary visual material, as the documentary shots, who pretends to be a direct reflection of reality, also mediated images. My work aims to analyze video artists experiments with language and as a culminating result create documentary film about the emigration from Lithuania.
46

Glimpses of grief

Leidig-Farmen, Pamela January 1992 (has links)
The purpose of this creative project was to represent the structure and dynamics of the emotion of grief through a visual medium. Grief, as a process that occurs over time, is usually represented sequentially and verbally as in the writings of Elisabeth Kubler-Ross. This project depicts the stages of grief by representing them both sequentially and simultaneously from a first person point of view by means of a visual medium, (i.e., videotape) in order to emotionally and personally involve the viewer in the process.The creative project is comprised of four video tapes each differing in length. of time between fifteen to thirtyfive minutes. The video tapes are presented as a documentary having a total of five participants who candidly express their experience with the death of a significant person in their lives and how they dealt with their grief. The four videos are shown all at the same time with the television monitors approximately twelve to fifteen feet apart.The video tapes are on file in the Art Department. / Department of Art
47

Francis Poulenc's sonata for two pianos : a multi-media presentation

Amos, Janet R. January 1996 (has links)
This project created a multi-media work that combined music and visual images in a video format to culminate my graduate studies. I explored computer graphics and video technology while drawing from a multi-faceted background in art. This project attempts to communicate through visual expression the innate qualities of music and sound, while reflecting my interests as an artist. I intend this work to be viewed as either a live performance piece to be accompanied by the piano duet, Sonata for Two Pianos, or as a recording on a computer monitor or television. / Department of Art
48

Urban metaphors in Hong Kong media art : reimagining place identity

Jim, Alice Ming Wai, 1970- January 2003 (has links)
This dissertation examines representations of the city and media art in Hong Kong from the late 1980s to the present to establish a link between the ways in which the city's place identity is re-imag(in)ed. Charting the course of media art in Hong Kong in relation to the parallel development of contemporary art in the region, it provides critical analyses of dominant urban metaphors that play a significant role, both locally and internationally, in the current representation of Hong Kong and its artistic practices. Specifically, the study explores how media artists have been dealing with four central urban metaphors that frequently arise in discussions of Hong Kong in relation to its place identity: City in Transition, Panoramic City, Compact City, and Mobile City. The hypothesis of this essay concerns the ways in which both the selected media artists and their works negotiate central urban metaphors in their search for Hong Kong's place identity. I designate each of these negotiations as a 'spatial portrait': a space of representation in which social experiences and relations are reconstructed and investigated. Through the critical analysis of these spatial portraits, I consider the development, shifts and imbrications of urban metaphors for Hong Kong and their contributions to, as well as their limitations for, understandings of artistic representations of urban space. Recognizing the local-global nexus from which these works emerge through considerations of the imaging of Hong Kong in the media and tourism industries, I propose an interpretation of the metaphor of the Mobile City as an updated version of the City of Transition. Ultimately, this dissertation offers an understanding of urban metaphors in Hong Kong media art in relation to the re-imag(in)ing of place identity situated between globalization discourse and the cultural politics of urban space, location and representation. It concludes that contemporary art's contribution to t
49

Me, my other self and I :

Crowest, Sarah, Unknown Date (has links)
The focus of this project is a creative investigation of the significance and function of the alter-ego in contemporary visual art, specifically in relation to sculpture, installation and video. / Artists, including myself, frequently develop characters or different personalities in and through their work in order to present an alternate, idealised or transformed self or as a tactic to investigate a different approach to their practice. These alternative constructed selves can function in diverse ways, often as a strategy for transgression, dispensing with accountability and/or for maintaining the freedoms and possibilities of a mutable identity. / Central to my research has been the development of a body of artefacts and texts that are made through, about or in response to a variety of my own alter-egos. Initially I inhabited three discrete alter-egos that were variations of myself, as an artist, in order to be able to observe and compare how they might operate and form an intra-subjective discourse. These version 'excursions', being Winifred, Edith and Sadie, can be more accurately described as semi-alter-egos because although the personalities are not entirely mine they are not different from mine they are not different from but simply 'mutilations' of my personality. They were initially outlined as Edith the struggling, self-effacing but creative loser, Winifred the straight faced, repressed, serious investigator brimming with curiosity and Sadie the successful, relaxed and happy self-enhancer for whom art and life flow. / The alter-egos evolved through changes of my appearance, behaviour and biographical data. Evidence of this approach is manifest through the amassing of fragments of images, artworks, video and photo documentation. The conception of Winifred, Edith and Sadie as artists allowed me to ground my activities in the studio around objects and materials through a project that was essentially a process. A critique of the art world is implied through the various strategies and responses of the alter-egos. The process eventually involved killing off these particular personae to more fully engage with questions of 'becoming' through a less contrived more unknowing approach to emerging alter-egos. / The artefacts were not conceived as an 'exhibition' but are residue of the research process and constitute the greater part of my thesis. The written exegesis elucidates the line of research undertaken within the studio practice with reference to personal perspectives and contemporary conceptions of the self. The exegesis also documents an exploration into the device and use of the alter-ego in recent visual arts practice and analyses how these constructed selves might permit, reveal, conceal or operate as projections of inner states or fulfilments of desire. My studio experiments and construction of artefacts have been informed by critical analysis of these functions and the ways in which they related or diverged from my own motivation and utilisation of the alter-ego. I briefly consider the area which includes abnormal psychological conditions such as the multiple personality and the splitting of the subject. / This project deals with complex philosophical issues without foregrounding a theoretical approach. The emphasis is on the generative potential through studio-based research in the area of visual arts. / Thesis (MVisualArts)--University of South Australia, 2007.
50

Double bind: splitting identity and the body as an object

Ishii, Kotoe January 2009 (has links)
Double Bind: Splitting identity and the body as an object is a research project consisting of studio-based practice presented mainly in video installation format. This work looks at hysterical symptoms as a performance of a body’s split identity. The project draws on the Lacanian theory of Mirror Stage which proposes that the self experienced by the subject, and the image of that self (represented in a mirror-like reflection, or an image) are different to each other, and the development of self-awareness as misrecognition of one’s self. As a conspicuous example of split body, Chapter One describes how the hysterical body, in clinical and artistic representation, is dissociated into multiple selves. In Chapter Two, I discuss some examples of contemporary performance artists who use themselves as subjects, but whose bodies become objects that do not portray the self. In the final chapter I explain how, in my video work, I objectify my own body and how I assess whether this is a mode of self-portraiture. / During the course of this research, I studied a wide range of medical resources and psychoanalytical literature, much of which employed visual illustration and documentation. For example, I have drawn inspiration from Jean-Martin Charcot’s photographic documents of female hysterics whom he treated as patients at the French hospital of La Salpêtrière in the late 19th century; in particular the figure of his most famous patient, known as Augustine. My research also involved studio-based investigation, such as experimentations with the performance of my own body in video format, and the contextual study of artistic and critical texts relating to contemporary media art. / The aim of this research is to demonstrate the ways in which my video performances split the body, creating an Other within one body that can be compared with the hysterical body of a patient, like Augustine, performing for her doctor. In this condition, I perform as the subject and the object of the gaze at the same time. My self-portrait is split in this way: it creates a body double, which I misrecognise as myself. But in doing so, I am both the director and the performer of the image. This is the double bind that my video work puts me into.

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