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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
1

Context-Based Intersectional Invisibility: memory for Black women in STEM

January 2016 (has links)
acase@tulane.edu / 1 / Sarah Podesta
2

The New Ontario Human Rights Code: Implications for an Intersectional Approach to Human Rights Claims

Steinberg, Kamini 15 February 2010 (has links)
This paper explores the theory of intersectionality and its viability for the analysis of human rights under the new legal process and institutional framework in Ontario. First, I examine the debate between essentialism and intersectionality and conclude that intersectionality is a more comprehensive and inclusive approach to anti-discrimination laws. Second, I examine Canadian Human Rights Code cases and Charter equality cases involving intersectional claims. These cases reveal three inadequate approaches to analyzing multiple grounds of discrimination and two positive developments in the intersectional analysis of human rights claims. After assessing the general congruence of the new institutional framework with the principles of administrative justice, I identify three recent changes to Ontario’s system that hinder the development of an intersectional analytical framework and I offer suggestions for improvement. I conclude that an intersectional approach to human rights claims is possible but is currently frustrated by the new institutional framework in Ontario.
3

The New Ontario Human Rights Code: Implications for an Intersectional Approach to Human Rights Claims

Steinberg, Kamini 15 February 2010 (has links)
This paper explores the theory of intersectionality and its viability for the analysis of human rights under the new legal process and institutional framework in Ontario. First, I examine the debate between essentialism and intersectionality and conclude that intersectionality is a more comprehensive and inclusive approach to anti-discrimination laws. Second, I examine Canadian Human Rights Code cases and Charter equality cases involving intersectional claims. These cases reveal three inadequate approaches to analyzing multiple grounds of discrimination and two positive developments in the intersectional analysis of human rights claims. After assessing the general congruence of the new institutional framework with the principles of administrative justice, I identify three recent changes to Ontario’s system that hinder the development of an intersectional analytical framework and I offer suggestions for improvement. I conclude that an intersectional approach to human rights claims is possible but is currently frustrated by the new institutional framework in Ontario.
4

Predictors of Drug Treatment Completion Among Black Women: A Black Feminist Intersectionality Approach

Miller, Carla Denise 02 December 2010 (has links)
This study used a national sample of substance abuse treatment centers to analyze predictors of drug treatment completion among a sample of black women compared to white women, white men, and black men. Data are drawn from the Treatment Episode Data Set - Discharges (TEDS-D) 2006, which is representative of treatment programs in 42 states and the District of Columbia. The sample consisted of black (n= 356,701) and whites (n=926,216). Results indicated that race, gender, and level of education (social class variable) all had statistically significant associations with drug treatment completion. That is, when compared to all the other respondents in the study, (i.e., black men, white women, and white males) black women were less likely to complete drug treatment. This study also found that blacks were underrepresented in drug treatment programs when compared to whites. This disparity is even more prevalent for black women. Overall, analyzing group differences in treatment outcomes and sociodemographic characteristics, black women appeared to be socioeconomically worse off than black men, white women, and white men. In fact, black women had significantly lower rates of employment and were almost twice as likely to report that their income source was from public assistance. Black women were less likely to be married, employed full-time, and were significantly more likely to report using cocaine or crack at the time of admission and indicate that cocaine or crack was their problem drug. Finally, when compared to other groups, black women were less educated, had lower drug treatment completion outcomes, were more likely to receive public assistance, and have lower employment rates. Again, these findings are not surprising and are consistent with a multitude of literature on drug treatment outcomes. / Ph. D.
5

KVINNOR ÄR SÄLLAN ”BARA” KVINNOR : en kvinnofokuserad intersektionell studie av två läroböcker i ämnena historia och engelska

Vodenicarevic, Alma, Roos, Christina January 2013 (has links)
In this study we have analysed from an intersectional perspective two textbooks Historia 1b and Progress Gold A which are purposed to be used as teaching material in Swedish schools in the subjects of History and English. Our question and reason for doing the analysis is to emphasise and make the variety of women in the books visible in order to compare that variety to the one that is demanded by the Swedish curriculum. The analysis is made from an ideology critical perspective and contains quantitative elements. Our conclusion is that the material contains both excluding and including features. Some intersectional categories are well represented while others, like functionality and religion, are not. This has a direct effect on the possibility to discover variation amongst the women represented in the material. Previous research states that it is not enough to leave the descriptions without problematizing them, which we found incoherent with the analysed books.
6

"We kind of bro out with each other too." Gender, race and sexuality on and off the rugby pitch

Adjepong, Lady Anima 12 September 2013 (has links)
This study examines the experiences of women rugby players to understand how gender informs their participation in a sport described as masculine. Considering how race, gender, and sexuality constitute women’s identities is important when answering the question of how women experience playing “masculine sports.” This project examines how race, specifically whiteness, and sexuality inform the gendered experiences of women athletes. Using interviews with women rugby players, I consider how women who play a sport characterized by masculinity describe their experiences as rugby players. I argue that reflecting on how race and sexuality constitute these athletes’ experiences illuminates the different ways in which the categories of masculinity and femininity are racially constructed, constantly in flux, and contested. / text
7

A Phenomenological Study of Transgender Youth With Disabilities High School Experiences

Ingram, Angela 11 January 2019 (has links)
The purpose of this study was to gain an in-depth understanding of the lived experiences of transgender youth with disabilties in high school. Utilizing in-depth phenomenological interviews and photography, this study sought to gain insights into how the lived experiences and intersections of transgender and disability identity impact high school experiences. The collection of interview data and photography allowed for a deeper understanding of the essence of the phenomenon under study. The aim was to understand the ways in which the complexities of ‘transgender’ and ‘disability’ identities impact high school experiences. The analysis of the data lead to six key themes including: gender as fluid, society and identity, conflation of identities, mental health, changes in school and difference as strength. This dissertation offers a more complete picture of the needs and barriers transgender youth with disabilities face to inform future research and practice. Results from this study extend the current research and provide a deeper understanding of the needs and challenges of transgendered youth with disabilities. Findings from this study also support implications for how educators work with transgender youth with disabilities and how schools can be more inclusive in meeting their needs.
8

Strengths in Intersecting Identities: The Experience of Being Black and a Sexual and Gender Minority

Cheperka, Ryan Anne 01 December 2012 (has links)
There has been a lack of inclusion of LGBTQ people of color within the psychological literature. It is important to attend to a number of diverse demographic variables in order to begin to understand a particular group's experience. The unique intersection of demographic variables or identities shapes a person's experience. Thus, the current study was designed to understand the experiences of those who are not typically represented within the literature. Specifically targeted were individuals who had some African American background and were both sexual and gender minorities. The focus of the current study was on life experiences and strengths due to researchers historically focusing on disadvantages of minority groups. This study was a qualitative investigation conducted in order to identify the strengths and influencing factors of strengths of those with multiple minority statuses. Twelve individuals that were at least in part African American and a sexual and gender (or gender identity) minority were interviewed in person. During the interview process participants discussed some of the challenges they faced, the support systems they had, and the various strengths they demonstrated throughout their lives. A grounded theory approach was utilized to analyze the data. The core phenomenon of this study, referred to as the storyline, revolved around participants' development and utilization of strengths, which included the working through various challenges and accessing support within their contexts. Consistent with past research, the development of strengths was impacted by sociocultural/societal factors, community, religion/spirituality, interpersonal relationships, life events, and intrapersonal concerns. Unique strengths included participants' tendency toward intrapersonal growth, perseverance, connections with others, activation of inner coping strategies, and activism.
9

LOTS OF AWFUL THINGS: INTERSECTIONS OF QUEERNESS AND CANCER THROUGH AUTOETHNOGRAPHY

Potter, Joshua Loren 01 August 2016 (has links)
Using autoethnography, this dissertation explores the relationship between my experiences through the treatment of papillary thyroid carcinoma and crip-queer theory. This dissertation seeks to bridge queer theory, disability studies, and medical discourse through personal experience. Additionally, by employing autoethnography, this study creates nuanced narratives of living with chronic illness at the intersections of disability and queerness. In Chapter One I provide a rationale and provide a cursory explanation of crip-queer theory. In my second chapter I employ Robert McRuer’s notion of the origin story to chart the development of crip-queer theory by looking to the similar activist histories of disability and sexuality within the United States. In Chapter Three I examine my solo performance Orphan Annie Eyes: Overcoming Narratives of Cancer and Loss, arguing that the performance challenges common narrative tropes surrounding disability. In my fourth chapter I use autoethnography to explore my experiences going through cancer treatment. Finally, my fifth chapter explores the implications of this dissertation and seeks to identify future research studies using crip-queer theory.
10

The Effectiveness Of Us Federal Hiv/aids Policy On Black Men Who Have Sex With Men: An Intersectionality Based Analysis & Evaluation

January 2015 (has links)
By the age of 35, Black Men who have Sex with Men (MSM’s) have a one in two chance of HIV infection. Black MSM’s, which represent less than one percent of the US population, is home to nearly a quarter of existing HIV cases, AIDS deaths as well as new HIV diagnosis. As early as 1987 studies were published revealing a paradoxical reality, that although Black MSM’s had no significant difference in risk behavior, there is a much larger HIV Prevalence among this group as nearly one in three Black MSM’s are HIV positive. Consistently and repeatedly, studies have shown Black MSM’s have fewer sexual partners than their White counterparts, and fewer occurrences of unprotected anal intercourse, yet significantly higher rates of HIV Incidence. The theoretical basis for this analysis is the concept Intersectionality, originated by Kimberlé Crenshaw, which states that cohorts comprised of multiple statuses of historic discrimination are qualitatively different from individual cohorts of component status. This qualitative difference requires the analysis of the composite cohort as an independent and unique entity as opposed to only looking at the components that it is made of. Therefore, Black MSM’s are a unique group and cannot be fully understood by looking at Black Men or MSM separately. This is particularly applicable for Black MSM’s because of the: history of oppression as Black Men, history of marginalization as MSM, isolation of Blacks within MSM community, isolation of MSM within the Black community and the history of HIV among Black MSM’s which dates back at least to 1969 (predating the publicly acknowledged epidemic in the White MSM community by 12 years) . This traditional policy analysis evaluated the 2010 National HIV/AIDS Strategy for its effectiveness in addressing HIV/AIDS among Black MSM’s. To accomplish this, a convergence of evidence approach was implemented, utilizing a key document review, qualitative interviews with key stakeholders, as well as quantitative surveys of 300 Black MSM’s. These methods were then applied to each of the four stages of Policy Analysis: agenda setting, formulation, implementation and evaluation. This analysis revealed a landmark policy that has comprehensively improved the Federal response to HIV in the US. Innovations developed and instituted because of this policy included the Community Listening Sessions of the formulation stage, and even more importantly the new metrics that better equip agencies to understand the nature of the epidemic. Further, the results of this study were compared with the August 2014 Kaiser Family Foundation study, which produced a nationally representative survey of Gay and Bisexual men (sampling error ±7%). The findings of this study paralleled and/or magnified those of Kaiser in several key areas. Kaiser found that Men of Color were more likely to know someone with HIV/AIDS and those that do are more likely to say it is a significant personal issue. The results of this study of Black MSM’s expose a sample where 97% knew someone who has/had HIV/AIDS and almost all considered this to be a significant personal issue. Both studies also confirmed the continuing presence of stigma and perceived discrimination by the general public. In both studies, evidence also indicates the opportunity for increasing frequency of HIV testing and the widespread lack of knowledge of PrEP (Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis). Several key recommendations should also be taken from this analysis to improve the policy moving forward. The first is that Black MSM’s should be an independent category for policy targeting. The next is that as Black MSM’s are the only group that is at high risk of infection and also makes up a large portion of the disease, Black MSM’s are a significant hotspot that should be a primary focus of the intervention. Finally, the greatest advances in fighting HIV have come through biomedical progress. Therefore, educating and implementing biomedical innovations such as PrEP should compliment behavioral change as intervention objectives. / 1 / Paul T. Winfield

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