• Refine Query
  • Source
  • Publication year
  • to
  • Language
  • 135
  • 108
  • 80
  • 26
  • 2
  • Tagged with
  • 382
  • 320
  • 164
  • 154
  • 153
  • 153
  • 153
  • 153
  • 68
  • 53
  • 47
  • 46
  • 43
  • 33
  • 28
  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
1

Concentric Circles for Orchestra

Shi , Fuhong 21 April 2010 (has links)
The concept for my thesis, titled Concentric Circles, as well as for its organizational framework, is inspired by the ancient Chinese book of divination called the I-Ching (Book of Changes). The I-Ching consists of sixty-four hexagrams and related texts. The hexagrams are formed by combinations of six unbroken (yang –) and/or broken (yin --) lines arranged on top of one another in a vertical sequence. There are sixty-four possible combinations which are distributed into four dynamic sections: Great Yin, Lesser Yang, Lesser Yin and Great Yang. I designed the four movements of Concentric Circles based on this order, and employed these terms as subtitles for each movement. Dualism and pluralism, along with the basic principles of simplicity, variability, and persistence, offer numerous possibilities for the construction of the musical parameters, and for development in the work. Concentric Circles is a hybrid of essential elements taken from various Western and Eastern composers, such as symmetry, multiple orchestral layers, and quartal and quintal harmony. From Debussy and Ravel, I have drawn orchestral colours and instrumentation. From Messiaen and Takemitsu, I have attempted to create a timeless atmosphere, poetic expressions, subtle timbres, and sounds drawn from nature. The polymetric process reflects the influence of Nancarrow and Ligeti. The extremes of orchestral dimensions and levels are drawn from Xenakis, while the melodic syntax which interlocks the ending and the beginning of the adjacent musical phrases reflects Chinese folk music. The movement and energy within the individual notes, textures such as the sustained long notes with vibrato, the timbral inter-relationships among different instrumental groups, the proportion and balance between silence (pauses) and music are all informed by the aesthetics of Chinese calligraphy. Four selected hexagrams from four different dynamic distributions are assigned odd and even numbers, forming minor and major seconds, which are used to construct four musical scales. These four scales are the basic musical material of each movement. Each movement is designed with different and specific orchestral colours. For example, the first movement focuses on rustling texture and exquisite softness in the strings; the second movement seeks transparent colours and echo effects in the woodwinds, strings and percussion; the third movement conjures up an energetic dance ritual with multiple timbral and textural layers in brass and the lower instruments; the last movement concludes the whole work with orchestral tutti.
2

Concentric Circles for Orchestra

Shi , Fuhong 21 April 2010 (has links)
The concept for my thesis, titled Concentric Circles, as well as for its organizational framework, is inspired by the ancient Chinese book of divination called the I-Ching (Book of Changes). The I-Ching consists of sixty-four hexagrams and related texts. The hexagrams are formed by combinations of six unbroken (yang –) and/or broken (yin --) lines arranged on top of one another in a vertical sequence. There are sixty-four possible combinations which are distributed into four dynamic sections: Great Yin, Lesser Yang, Lesser Yin and Great Yang. I designed the four movements of Concentric Circles based on this order, and employed these terms as subtitles for each movement. Dualism and pluralism, along with the basic principles of simplicity, variability, and persistence, offer numerous possibilities for the construction of the musical parameters, and for development in the work. Concentric Circles is a hybrid of essential elements taken from various Western and Eastern composers, such as symmetry, multiple orchestral layers, and quartal and quintal harmony. From Debussy and Ravel, I have drawn orchestral colours and instrumentation. From Messiaen and Takemitsu, I have attempted to create a timeless atmosphere, poetic expressions, subtle timbres, and sounds drawn from nature. The polymetric process reflects the influence of Nancarrow and Ligeti. The extremes of orchestral dimensions and levels are drawn from Xenakis, while the melodic syntax which interlocks the ending and the beginning of the adjacent musical phrases reflects Chinese folk music. The movement and energy within the individual notes, textures such as the sustained long notes with vibrato, the timbral inter-relationships among different instrumental groups, the proportion and balance between silence (pauses) and music are all informed by the aesthetics of Chinese calligraphy. Four selected hexagrams from four different dynamic distributions are assigned odd and even numbers, forming minor and major seconds, which are used to construct four musical scales. These four scales are the basic musical material of each movement. Each movement is designed with different and specific orchestral colours. For example, the first movement focuses on rustling texture and exquisite softness in the strings; the second movement seeks transparent colours and echo effects in the woodwinds, strings and percussion; the third movement conjures up an energetic dance ritual with multiple timbral and textural layers in brass and the lower instruments; the last movement concludes the whole work with orchestral tutti.
3

Exploring notions of national style : New Zealand orchestral music in the late twentieth century

Keam, Glenda Ruth January 2006 (has links)
The question of cultural identity in New Zealand literature, visual art and music has been an important one for many decades. New Zealand's relative isolation, sparse population, short history and colonial past have all contributed to a heightened national awareness of, and sensitivity to, its cultural condition. This study aims to explore, with an analyst's eye and ear, notions of national style through a group of orchestral works. Contemporary critical musicology, which flourished in the 1990s, typically integrates various frames of reference and suggests that analysis be framed in the broader cultural context of a work's genesis and performance. Examining the ways in which New Zealand's notions of national identity have affected its artistic production, this study considers claims that the particular environmental conditions of the land have imprinted themselves onto the nation's music. Furthermore, it investigates claims that New Zealand's remote and open spaces have generated perceptible effects in the nation's musical style, while also asking whether the purported importance of the landscape is not actually a myth which sits alongside the nation's other myths of identity. The literature regarding notions of 'musical space' is surveyed, bringing to light a number of musical elements which may connote space. Seven New Zealand orchestral works, composed between 1976 and 1995 and signalled by the composers as having some connection with the land, are found to share musical features, thus suggesting a national style insofar as 'landscape' works from this period are concerned. I then examine the works for 'space' elements, to investigate whether there are identifiable elements which connote a 'sense of space' in New Zealand music. A corollary of this belief in a national style is that any influences at work from New Zealand land(scapes) on New Zealand music will produce different musical results from those at work from other land(scapes) on music in other countries. After noting the most prevalent musical elements in the New Zealand works, four comparable 'landscape' orchestral works from other countries are also discussed, in order to offset and contextualize the New Zealand findings. This is the first detailed study of New Zealand music that has investigated national style, concepts of landscape-in-music, and musical space through analytical examination. It thus contributes to the small but growing body of New Zealand musical studies, and to an overall picture of New Zealand cultural identity.
4

Interrupted

Galbraith, Craig Lee 21 August 2012 (has links)
INTERRUPTED is a composition for a small orchestra that explores the process of creating a larger work from smaller, individual “moments.” The duration and structure of the individual movements are a response to a neurological dysfunction which limited the composer’s working memory and concentration. The composer’s former methodology of through-composing and evolving large structural elements over extended time spans was no longer possible. A new creative process was developed where the current moment at hand was the only moment that mattered. This new approach was both practical and philosophical, and allows the freedom of writing an idea that may have little to do with what precedes it, and may or may not influence what follows. The common thread linking the movements was a loose system of pitch structure that was developed from the intersection of overlapping enneatonic and octatonic scales. The resulting mini-compositions serve as individual “moments” which were then arranged and edited with some repeating variations, to create a cohesive whole. INTERRUPTED showed the composer that the perceived limitation of one’s creative process can be re-tuned to become a strength and an outlet for new directions in creative output.
5

Interrupted

Galbraith, Craig Lee 21 August 2012 (has links)
INTERRUPTED is a composition for a small orchestra that explores the process of creating a larger work from smaller, individual “moments.” The duration and structure of the individual movements are a response to a neurological dysfunction which limited the composer’s working memory and concentration. The composer’s former methodology of through-composing and evolving large structural elements over extended time spans was no longer possible. A new creative process was developed where the current moment at hand was the only moment that mattered. This new approach was both practical and philosophical, and allows the freedom of writing an idea that may have little to do with what precedes it, and may or may not influence what follows. The common thread linking the movements was a loose system of pitch structure that was developed from the intersection of overlapping enneatonic and octatonic scales. The resulting mini-compositions serve as individual “moments” which were then arranged and edited with some repeating variations, to create a cohesive whole. INTERRUPTED showed the composer that the perceived limitation of one’s creative process can be re-tuned to become a strength and an outlet for new directions in creative output.
6

Exploring notions of national style : New Zealand orchestral music in the late twentieth century

Keam, Glenda Ruth January 2006 (has links)
The question of cultural identity in New Zealand literature, visual art and music has been an important one for many decades. New Zealand's relative isolation, sparse population, short history and colonial past have all contributed to a heightened national awareness of, and sensitivity to, its cultural condition. This study aims to explore, with an analyst's eye and ear, notions of national style through a group of orchestral works. Contemporary critical musicology, which flourished in the 1990s, typically integrates various frames of reference and suggests that analysis be framed in the broader cultural context of a work's genesis and performance. Examining the ways in which New Zealand's notions of national identity have affected its artistic production, this study considers claims that the particular environmental conditions of the land have imprinted themselves onto the nation's music. Furthermore, it investigates claims that New Zealand's remote and open spaces have generated perceptible effects in the nation's musical style, while also asking whether the purported importance of the landscape is not actually a myth which sits alongside the nation's other myths of identity. The literature regarding notions of 'musical space' is surveyed, bringing to light a number of musical elements which may connote space. Seven New Zealand orchestral works, composed between 1976 and 1995 and signalled by the composers as having some connection with the land, are found to share musical features, thus suggesting a national style insofar as 'landscape' works from this period are concerned. I then examine the works for 'space' elements, to investigate whether there are identifiable elements which connote a 'sense of space' in New Zealand music. A corollary of this belief in a national style is that any influences at work from New Zealand land(scapes) on New Zealand music will produce different musical results from those at work from other land(scapes) on music in other countries. After noting the most prevalent musical elements in the New Zealand works, four comparable 'landscape' orchestral works from other countries are also discussed, in order to offset and contextualize the New Zealand findings. This is the first detailed study of New Zealand music that has investigated national style, concepts of landscape-in-music, and musical space through analytical examination. It thus contributes to the small but growing body of New Zealand musical studies, and to an overall picture of New Zealand cultural identity.
7

Exploring notions of national style : New Zealand orchestral music in the late twentieth century

Keam, Glenda Ruth January 2006 (has links)
The question of cultural identity in New Zealand literature, visual art and music has been an important one for many decades. New Zealand's relative isolation, sparse population, short history and colonial past have all contributed to a heightened national awareness of, and sensitivity to, its cultural condition. This study aims to explore, with an analyst's eye and ear, notions of national style through a group of orchestral works. Contemporary critical musicology, which flourished in the 1990s, typically integrates various frames of reference and suggests that analysis be framed in the broader cultural context of a work's genesis and performance. Examining the ways in which New Zealand's notions of national identity have affected its artistic production, this study considers claims that the particular environmental conditions of the land have imprinted themselves onto the nation's music. Furthermore, it investigates claims that New Zealand's remote and open spaces have generated perceptible effects in the nation's musical style, while also asking whether the purported importance of the landscape is not actually a myth which sits alongside the nation's other myths of identity. The literature regarding notions of 'musical space' is surveyed, bringing to light a number of musical elements which may connote space. Seven New Zealand orchestral works, composed between 1976 and 1995 and signalled by the composers as having some connection with the land, are found to share musical features, thus suggesting a national style insofar as 'landscape' works from this period are concerned. I then examine the works for 'space' elements, to investigate whether there are identifiable elements which connote a 'sense of space' in New Zealand music. A corollary of this belief in a national style is that any influences at work from New Zealand land(scapes) on New Zealand music will produce different musical results from those at work from other land(scapes) on music in other countries. After noting the most prevalent musical elements in the New Zealand works, four comparable 'landscape' orchestral works from other countries are also discussed, in order to offset and contextualize the New Zealand findings. This is the first detailed study of New Zealand music that has investigated national style, concepts of landscape-in-music, and musical space through analytical examination. It thus contributes to the small but growing body of New Zealand musical studies, and to an overall picture of New Zealand cultural identity.
8

Exploring notions of national style : New Zealand orchestral music in the late twentieth century

Keam, Glenda Ruth January 2006 (has links)
The question of cultural identity in New Zealand literature, visual art and music has been an important one for many decades. New Zealand's relative isolation, sparse population, short history and colonial past have all contributed to a heightened national awareness of, and sensitivity to, its cultural condition. This study aims to explore, with an analyst's eye and ear, notions of national style through a group of orchestral works. Contemporary critical musicology, which flourished in the 1990s, typically integrates various frames of reference and suggests that analysis be framed in the broader cultural context of a work's genesis and performance. Examining the ways in which New Zealand's notions of national identity have affected its artistic production, this study considers claims that the particular environmental conditions of the land have imprinted themselves onto the nation's music. Furthermore, it investigates claims that New Zealand's remote and open spaces have generated perceptible effects in the nation's musical style, while also asking whether the purported importance of the landscape is not actually a myth which sits alongside the nation's other myths of identity. The literature regarding notions of 'musical space' is surveyed, bringing to light a number of musical elements which may connote space. Seven New Zealand orchestral works, composed between 1976 and 1995 and signalled by the composers as having some connection with the land, are found to share musical features, thus suggesting a national style insofar as 'landscape' works from this period are concerned. I then examine the works for 'space' elements, to investigate whether there are identifiable elements which connote a 'sense of space' in New Zealand music. A corollary of this belief in a national style is that any influences at work from New Zealand land(scapes) on New Zealand music will produce different musical results from those at work from other land(scapes) on music in other countries. After noting the most prevalent musical elements in the New Zealand works, four comparable 'landscape' orchestral works from other countries are also discussed, in order to offset and contextualize the New Zealand findings. This is the first detailed study of New Zealand music that has investigated national style, concepts of landscape-in-music, and musical space through analytical examination. It thus contributes to the small but growing body of New Zealand musical studies, and to an overall picture of New Zealand cultural identity.
9

Exploring notions of national style : New Zealand orchestral music in the late twentieth century

Keam, Glenda Ruth January 2006 (has links)
The question of cultural identity in New Zealand literature, visual art and music has been an important one for many decades. New Zealand's relative isolation, sparse population, short history and colonial past have all contributed to a heightened national awareness of, and sensitivity to, its cultural condition. This study aims to explore, with an analyst's eye and ear, notions of national style through a group of orchestral works. Contemporary critical musicology, which flourished in the 1990s, typically integrates various frames of reference and suggests that analysis be framed in the broader cultural context of a work's genesis and performance. Examining the ways in which New Zealand's notions of national identity have affected its artistic production, this study considers claims that the particular environmental conditions of the land have imprinted themselves onto the nation's music. Furthermore, it investigates claims that New Zealand's remote and open spaces have generated perceptible effects in the nation's musical style, while also asking whether the purported importance of the landscape is not actually a myth which sits alongside the nation's other myths of identity. The literature regarding notions of 'musical space' is surveyed, bringing to light a number of musical elements which may connote space. Seven New Zealand orchestral works, composed between 1976 and 1995 and signalled by the composers as having some connection with the land, are found to share musical features, thus suggesting a national style insofar as 'landscape' works from this period are concerned. I then examine the works for 'space' elements, to investigate whether there are identifiable elements which connote a 'sense of space' in New Zealand music. A corollary of this belief in a national style is that any influences at work from New Zealand land(scapes) on New Zealand music will produce different musical results from those at work from other land(scapes) on music in other countries. After noting the most prevalent musical elements in the New Zealand works, four comparable 'landscape' orchestral works from other countries are also discussed, in order to offset and contextualize the New Zealand findings. This is the first detailed study of New Zealand music that has investigated national style, concepts of landscape-in-music, and musical space through analytical examination. It thus contributes to the small but growing body of New Zealand musical studies, and to an overall picture of New Zealand cultural identity.
10

Fiddle Grooves: Identity, Representation, and the Sound of Cape Breton Fiddle Music in Popular Culture

Hennessy, Jeffrey 20 January 2009 (has links)
This dissertation investigates Cape Breton fiddle music from a popular culture perspective. It introduces a conception of musical groove comprising two interrelated components: a social component wherein individual musical actors retain their own identities and relationships with the music while also uniting collectively in their response to the music, and a sonic component consisting of an acoustical repeating of a rhythmic idea that forms the metrical underpinning for a piece of groove music. Each of these two components is informed and mediated by the other. Cape Breton fiddle music is considered here as a form of groove-based popular music, similar to other groove musics. The two dimensions of the groove are analyzed in turn, revealing aspects of social identity, political and commercial representation, and processes of intercultural syncretism that have resulted in the evolution of the music within the pop culture mainstream. The dissertation is divided into two large sections. The first section concerns the social component of the Cape Breton fiddle groove, considering aspects of cultural representation, social identity, globalization and perceived external threats, and intersections with popular culture. The second section examines the sound of Cape Breton fiddle music as a form of groove-based music by first proposing a general model for the analysis of groove-based musics, and then applying the model to the Cape Breton fiddle context. The social and sonic components of Cape Breton fiddle grooves are treated as mutually reinforcing components of the same cultural product. Explorations of social identity and cultural representation of Cape Breton fiddle music determine those aspects of the sonic dimension of the music with the most social salience. In turn, analyses of the sound of Cape Breton fiddle grooves influence the understanding of the contemporary and historical socio-cultural community. Cape Breton fiddle music is therefore used here as a case study for combining the powerful modes of inquiry from the disciplines of music theory and ethnomusicology, leading to a richer and more nuanced understanding of musical traditions and cultures in general.

Page generated in 0.0249 seconds