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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
1

Exploring notions of national style : New Zealand orchestral music in the late twentieth century

Keam, Glenda Ruth January 2006 (has links)
The question of cultural identity in New Zealand literature, visual art and music has been an important one for many decades. New Zealand's relative isolation, sparse population, short history and colonial past have all contributed to a heightened national awareness of, and sensitivity to, its cultural condition. This study aims to explore, with an analyst's eye and ear, notions of national style through a group of orchestral works. Contemporary critical musicology, which flourished in the 1990s, typically integrates various frames of reference and suggests that analysis be framed in the broader cultural context of a work's genesis and performance. Examining the ways in which New Zealand's notions of national identity have affected its artistic production, this study considers claims that the particular environmental conditions of the land have imprinted themselves onto the nation's music. Furthermore, it investigates claims that New Zealand's remote and open spaces have generated perceptible effects in the nation's musical style, while also asking whether the purported importance of the landscape is not actually a myth which sits alongside the nation's other myths of identity. The literature regarding notions of 'musical space' is surveyed, bringing to light a number of musical elements which may connote space. Seven New Zealand orchestral works, composed between 1976 and 1995 and signalled by the composers as having some connection with the land, are found to share musical features, thus suggesting a national style insofar as 'landscape' works from this period are concerned. I then examine the works for 'space' elements, to investigate whether there are identifiable elements which connote a 'sense of space' in New Zealand music. A corollary of this belief in a national style is that any influences at work from New Zealand land(scapes) on New Zealand music will produce different musical results from those at work from other land(scapes) on music in other countries. After noting the most prevalent musical elements in the New Zealand works, four comparable 'landscape' orchestral works from other countries are also discussed, in order to offset and contextualize the New Zealand findings. This is the first detailed study of New Zealand music that has investigated national style, concepts of landscape-in-music, and musical space through analytical examination. It thus contributes to the small but growing body of New Zealand musical studies, and to an overall picture of New Zealand cultural identity.
2

Exploring notions of national style : New Zealand orchestral music in the late twentieth century

Keam, Glenda Ruth January 2006 (has links)
The question of cultural identity in New Zealand literature, visual art and music has been an important one for many decades. New Zealand's relative isolation, sparse population, short history and colonial past have all contributed to a heightened national awareness of, and sensitivity to, its cultural condition. This study aims to explore, with an analyst's eye and ear, notions of national style through a group of orchestral works. Contemporary critical musicology, which flourished in the 1990s, typically integrates various frames of reference and suggests that analysis be framed in the broader cultural context of a work's genesis and performance. Examining the ways in which New Zealand's notions of national identity have affected its artistic production, this study considers claims that the particular environmental conditions of the land have imprinted themselves onto the nation's music. Furthermore, it investigates claims that New Zealand's remote and open spaces have generated perceptible effects in the nation's musical style, while also asking whether the purported importance of the landscape is not actually a myth which sits alongside the nation's other myths of identity. The literature regarding notions of 'musical space' is surveyed, bringing to light a number of musical elements which may connote space. Seven New Zealand orchestral works, composed between 1976 and 1995 and signalled by the composers as having some connection with the land, are found to share musical features, thus suggesting a national style insofar as 'landscape' works from this period are concerned. I then examine the works for 'space' elements, to investigate whether there are identifiable elements which connote a 'sense of space' in New Zealand music. A corollary of this belief in a national style is that any influences at work from New Zealand land(scapes) on New Zealand music will produce different musical results from those at work from other land(scapes) on music in other countries. After noting the most prevalent musical elements in the New Zealand works, four comparable 'landscape' orchestral works from other countries are also discussed, in order to offset and contextualize the New Zealand findings. This is the first detailed study of New Zealand music that has investigated national style, concepts of landscape-in-music, and musical space through analytical examination. It thus contributes to the small but growing body of New Zealand musical studies, and to an overall picture of New Zealand cultural identity.
3

Exploring notions of national style : New Zealand orchestral music in the late twentieth century

Keam, Glenda Ruth January 2006 (has links)
The question of cultural identity in New Zealand literature, visual art and music has been an important one for many decades. New Zealand's relative isolation, sparse population, short history and colonial past have all contributed to a heightened national awareness of, and sensitivity to, its cultural condition. This study aims to explore, with an analyst's eye and ear, notions of national style through a group of orchestral works. Contemporary critical musicology, which flourished in the 1990s, typically integrates various frames of reference and suggests that analysis be framed in the broader cultural context of a work's genesis and performance. Examining the ways in which New Zealand's notions of national identity have affected its artistic production, this study considers claims that the particular environmental conditions of the land have imprinted themselves onto the nation's music. Furthermore, it investigates claims that New Zealand's remote and open spaces have generated perceptible effects in the nation's musical style, while also asking whether the purported importance of the landscape is not actually a myth which sits alongside the nation's other myths of identity. The literature regarding notions of 'musical space' is surveyed, bringing to light a number of musical elements which may connote space. Seven New Zealand orchestral works, composed between 1976 and 1995 and signalled by the composers as having some connection with the land, are found to share musical features, thus suggesting a national style insofar as 'landscape' works from this period are concerned. I then examine the works for 'space' elements, to investigate whether there are identifiable elements which connote a 'sense of space' in New Zealand music. A corollary of this belief in a national style is that any influences at work from New Zealand land(scapes) on New Zealand music will produce different musical results from those at work from other land(scapes) on music in other countries. After noting the most prevalent musical elements in the New Zealand works, four comparable 'landscape' orchestral works from other countries are also discussed, in order to offset and contextualize the New Zealand findings. This is the first detailed study of New Zealand music that has investigated national style, concepts of landscape-in-music, and musical space through analytical examination. It thus contributes to the small but growing body of New Zealand musical studies, and to an overall picture of New Zealand cultural identity.
4

Exploring notions of national style : New Zealand orchestral music in the late twentieth century

Keam, Glenda Ruth January 2006 (has links)
The question of cultural identity in New Zealand literature, visual art and music has been an important one for many decades. New Zealand's relative isolation, sparse population, short history and colonial past have all contributed to a heightened national awareness of, and sensitivity to, its cultural condition. This study aims to explore, with an analyst's eye and ear, notions of national style through a group of orchestral works. Contemporary critical musicology, which flourished in the 1990s, typically integrates various frames of reference and suggests that analysis be framed in the broader cultural context of a work's genesis and performance. Examining the ways in which New Zealand's notions of national identity have affected its artistic production, this study considers claims that the particular environmental conditions of the land have imprinted themselves onto the nation's music. Furthermore, it investigates claims that New Zealand's remote and open spaces have generated perceptible effects in the nation's musical style, while also asking whether the purported importance of the landscape is not actually a myth which sits alongside the nation's other myths of identity. The literature regarding notions of 'musical space' is surveyed, bringing to light a number of musical elements which may connote space. Seven New Zealand orchestral works, composed between 1976 and 1995 and signalled by the composers as having some connection with the land, are found to share musical features, thus suggesting a national style insofar as 'landscape' works from this period are concerned. I then examine the works for 'space' elements, to investigate whether there are identifiable elements which connote a 'sense of space' in New Zealand music. A corollary of this belief in a national style is that any influences at work from New Zealand land(scapes) on New Zealand music will produce different musical results from those at work from other land(scapes) on music in other countries. After noting the most prevalent musical elements in the New Zealand works, four comparable 'landscape' orchestral works from other countries are also discussed, in order to offset and contextualize the New Zealand findings. This is the first detailed study of New Zealand music that has investigated national style, concepts of landscape-in-music, and musical space through analytical examination. It thus contributes to the small but growing body of New Zealand musical studies, and to an overall picture of New Zealand cultural identity.
5

Exploring notions of national style : New Zealand orchestral music in the late twentieth century

Keam, Glenda Ruth January 2006 (has links)
The question of cultural identity in New Zealand literature, visual art and music has been an important one for many decades. New Zealand's relative isolation, sparse population, short history and colonial past have all contributed to a heightened national awareness of, and sensitivity to, its cultural condition. This study aims to explore, with an analyst's eye and ear, notions of national style through a group of orchestral works. Contemporary critical musicology, which flourished in the 1990s, typically integrates various frames of reference and suggests that analysis be framed in the broader cultural context of a work's genesis and performance. Examining the ways in which New Zealand's notions of national identity have affected its artistic production, this study considers claims that the particular environmental conditions of the land have imprinted themselves onto the nation's music. Furthermore, it investigates claims that New Zealand's remote and open spaces have generated perceptible effects in the nation's musical style, while also asking whether the purported importance of the landscape is not actually a myth which sits alongside the nation's other myths of identity. The literature regarding notions of 'musical space' is surveyed, bringing to light a number of musical elements which may connote space. Seven New Zealand orchestral works, composed between 1976 and 1995 and signalled by the composers as having some connection with the land, are found to share musical features, thus suggesting a national style insofar as 'landscape' works from this period are concerned. I then examine the works for 'space' elements, to investigate whether there are identifiable elements which connote a 'sense of space' in New Zealand music. A corollary of this belief in a national style is that any influences at work from New Zealand land(scapes) on New Zealand music will produce different musical results from those at work from other land(scapes) on music in other countries. After noting the most prevalent musical elements in the New Zealand works, four comparable 'landscape' orchestral works from other countries are also discussed, in order to offset and contextualize the New Zealand findings. This is the first detailed study of New Zealand music that has investigated national style, concepts of landscape-in-music, and musical space through analytical examination. It thus contributes to the small but growing body of New Zealand musical studies, and to an overall picture of New Zealand cultural identity.
6

An examination of major works for wind band: “Hands across the sea march” by John Philip Sousa, “Michigan's motors” by Thomas Duffy, “In the forest of the king: a suite of old French songs' by Pierre la Plante and “Yorkshire ballad” by James Barnes.

Bailey, Candace Leann January 1900 (has links)
Master of Music / Department of Music / Frank C. Tracz / The following report details the research and analysis required for completion of the degree, Master of Music from Kansas State University. This project was culminated in the conducting performance by Candace Bailey of four pieces during the 2009-2010 school year. The symphonic, concert and combined bands of Shawnee Mission North High School in Overland Park, KS contributed time, skills and feedback for the successful performance of Hands Across the Sea by John Philip Sousa, Michigan’s Motors by Thomas Duffy, Yorkshire Ballad by James Barnes and In the Forest of the King by Pierre LaPlante. Documentation of processes are detailed in lesson plans and critical evaluations of rehearsals. Analysis models were provided by the Unit Teacher Resource Guide, developed by Richard Miles, and the Macro-Micro-Macro score analysis form created by Dr. Frank Tracz.
7

An examination of major works for wind band : Firework music by George Frederick Handel arranged by Philip Gordon, Portrait of a clown by Frank Ticheli, A childhood hymn arranged by David Holsinger, and Citadel concert march by Frank Erickson

Rogers, James Delbert January 1900 (has links)
Master of Music / Department of Music / Frank Tracz / The following report is research and analysis from the comprehensive examination question based on the Graduate Conducting Recital of James D. Rogers. The recital, performed by the Mission Valley High School Band, was held in the gymnasium of Mission Valley Schools USD #330 on May 4, 2013 at 7:00 p.m. Pieces of music performed were Firework Music by George Frederick Handel and arranged by Phillip Gordon, Portrait of a Clown by Frank Ticheli, A Childhood Hymn by David Holsinger, and Citadel: Concert March by Frank Erickson. In addition to the analysis of the mentioned music, this document also contains rehearsal plans used in the preparation of the music for performance.
8

An examination of works for band: Southern folk rhapsody, arranged by Michael Sweeney, On a hymnsong of Philip Bliss, arranged by David Holsinger, Music from wicked, arranged by Michael Sweeney, Whispers of the wind, by David Shaffer

Eastvold, Jared January 1900 (has links)
Master of Music / Department of Music / Frank C. Tracz / The following report is research and analysis from the comprehensive examination question based on the Graduate Conducting Recital of Jared Eastvold. The recital was performed by the Leyton High School Band, on on May 8, at 7:00 p.m., in Dalton, Nebraska. The repertoire included Southern Folk Rhapsody, arranged by Michael Sweeney; On a Hymnsong of Philip Bliss, arranged by David Holsinger; Music from Wicked, arranged by Michael Sweeney; and Whispers of the Wind, by David Shaffer. This document contains analysis, both theoretical and historical, and outlines the procedures of planning and performing the graduate conducting recital. This report also includes a detailed analysis of the recital music, using both the Blocher/Miles and the Tracz formats. A philosophy of music education is presented as the foundation to planning rehearsals and selecting the music for the recital. An overview of the music program at Leyton is given to provide background to the performance organization. Comprehensive rehearsal plans for the works are also given.
9

An evolution of song: Opera, Oratorio, and Art Song

Wakeley, Meghan A. January 1900 (has links)
Master of Music / Department of Music / Reginald L. Pittman / This master’s report is a discussion of the selections and composers presented on my graduate recital performed in All Faiths Chapel on Thursday, April 28, 2010. This report is also an in-depth look at the history and evolution of opera arias, oratorio, and art songs beginning in the Renaissance period. The first chapter discusses song in the Renaissance period and the origin of opera. Chapter two discusses oratorio and the Baroque period. Chapter three discusses art song and opera arias in the Classical period, with particular emphasis on Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart. Chapter four discusses art song and opera aria in the Bel Canto style and Romantic period. Chapter four will also include information about the operetta. Chapter five discusses art song and opera aria in the Modern period.
10

An examination of works for wind band: an english folk setting arranged by John Edmondson, a childhood hymn by David r. Holsinger, Mister Joe by Harold Bennet arranged by Larry Clark, and Celtic Air and Dance arranged by Michael Sweeney.

Lorenson, Zachary Steven January 1900 (has links)
Master of Music / Department of Music / Frank C. Tracz / This report will present a detailed analysis of An English Folk Setting arranged by John Edmondson, A Childhood Hymn by David R. Holsinger, Mister Joe by Harold Bennett arranged by Larry Clark, and Celtic Air and Dance arranged by Michael Sweeney. The analyses are modeled on the “Teaching Music Through Performance in Band” series edited by Richard Miles, and the Macro-Micro-Macro score analysis form created by Dr. Frank Tracz. Chapter 2 will discuss the importance of music education as part of a well-rounded curriculum. Chapter 3 will discuss the importance of the use of quality literature, and how to determine if a piece of music is of high quality.

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