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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
1

Assessment of municipal solid waste leachate pollution on soil and groundwater system at Onderstepoort landfill site in Pretoria

Tshibalo, Rudzani 06 1900 (has links)
This study focuses on determining the quality of soil and groundwater at the Onderstepoort Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) landfill site. The study area is situated in Pretoria North, a jurisdiction of City of Tshwane Metropolitan Municipality (CTMM). Samples were collected from three different spheres (i.e. leachate, soil and water) in the study area, to determine the concentration of metals accumulated in each sphere. The three spheres provided an overview of the contaminants found in leachate, soil and water. The laboratory analyses using Inductively Coupled Plasma-Mass Spectrometry (ICP-MS) indicated that soils in the site have been severely contaminated with heavy metals. Higher concentrations of heavy metals occurred in the soils compared to the groundwater surrounding the landfill site and this may be due to the ability of the soil strata to absorb the contaminants caused by the landfill leachate. In essence, the measurements indicated that leachate soil has very high pollutant levels (0.21 to 2505.61 mg/kg); soil was characterised by fairly-high pollutant levels (0.03 to 638.27 mg/kg); leachate solution has given rise to moderate pollutant levels (0.01 to 2.296 mg/L) and water resources have low-moderate pollutant levels (<0.0001 to 0.456 mg/L) depending on the location. Furthermore, the findings indicated that the soil was contaminated with lead, cadmium, copper, zinc and nickel, and the concentration increases particularly where the generation of leachate is taking place. Groundwater, particularly in Borehole 2 has been moderately contaminated with nitrite, calcium and manganese. The findings also indicated that the concentrations of contaminants become high in borehole located close to the waste dump and decrease further away from the waste dump. The chemical analysis of this groundwater indicated that the concentrations of chemical properties have increased since the year 2009. This was determined through the comparison of groundwater study undertaken in 2009 to the current study results obtained. The site geological formation, Rustenburg Layered Suite is known to contain the anomalies of nickel, chromium, vanadium, copper, arsenic, lead and zinc but these are less toxic and less distributed. Therefore, the primary source of pollution at the study area could be the landfill operation through the generation of leachate affecting both soil and water / College of Agriculture and Environmental Sciences / M. Sc. (Environmental Sciences)
2

A study on working conditions and health status of waste pickers working at landfill sites in the City of Tshwane Metropolitan Municipality

Mothiba, Mathema Phozisa 01 March 2017 (has links)
Waste management is a global phenomenon and a challenge to all nations. There is a need to ensure that waste is handled in an environmental friendly and healthy manner. The high rate of unemployment in South Africa leads to elevated poverty, which is one of the most serious socio-economic problems in developing countries. This leads to people opting to work anywhere, particularly in the informal sector for survival. Waste picking is classified as a type of informal employment. In South Africa, the last stage in the life cycle of waste disposal is at the landfill sites. Landfill sites are normally located on the outskirts of towns and away from communities for safety and health reasons. This study researched the working conditions and health status of waste pickers working at some landfill sites in the City of Tshwane Metropolitan Municipality, namely Ga-Rankuwa, Onderstepoort and Hatherly. The study used a multi method approach, where both qualitative and quantitative factors of research were utilized. Data was gathered through survey questionnaire with a sample of 176 waste pickers at three landfill sites, together with unstructured interviews with municipal workers. The researcher also observed how waste pickers work at the landfill sites. Some of the findings of this study are that: • About 66 % of waste pickers at the landfill sites were females with an average age of 45 years. • A majority (93 %) of waste pickers did not reach matric and were not employable in the formal sector • Most waste pickers (53%) work 5 days and a few (41%) work 6 days per week. • Only 22% of participants reported injury at work and 41% consulted the clinic or hospital due to injury or illness. Descriptive statistical results of the study revealed that waste pickers view their health to be fair as compared to their peers but were not satisfied with their working conditions. Waste pickers are aware of stigma including health challenges associated with working at a landfill site and the need of acting appropriately in protecting themselves / Department of Environmental Sciences / M. Sc. (Environmental Management)
3

Assessment of waste management practices in the informal business sector in Olievenhoutbosch township, Pretoria

Dube, Innocent 02 1900 (has links)
The increase in global population and high urbanisation rates characterised by high resource consumption and waste generation levels has led to challenges in waste management around the world. Waste management remains one of the most critical challenges faced by local governments in developing countries. Informal business enterprises have come under the spotlight for their high waste production and poor waste management practices. Many arguments have been put forward as to the real environmental impacts caused by informal business enterprises due to their waste practices. This research aimed at assessing the waste management practices in the informal business sector in Olievenhoutbosch Township, Pretoria. Data collection was carried out between March 2016 and September 2016. The research utilised both qualitative and quantitative methods. The methodology employed techniques that included structured questionnaires, structured interviews and field observations. Semi- structured face to face interviews were carried out with key informants. These interviews provided information on the frequency of waste collection, available waste management awareness and challenges faced in delivering the service. The research also involved 230 field observations to study the pattern and frequency of waste collection and waste behaviours by informal business enterprises. Questionnaires were administered to 120 informal business enterprises with a response rate of 84.17%. Data from questionnaires and field observations indicated that waste generated by informal business enterprises (plastic bags, card board, packaging plastics, glass bottles and plastic bottles) was mainly recyclable waste. The most preferred disposal methods were use of refuse plastic bags (31%), open space dumping (20%) and burning (30%). Analysis of the results showed that there was lack of information on waste management and that also influenced waste behaviours. Preferences for waste disposal methods were influenced by many factors including lack of information, shortage of waste disposal facilities and waste collection frequency by the local town council. The research found that waste collection in various sections of the township was done once per week which has led to increased indiscriminate waste dumping and burning of waste. It was recommended that waste management information be provided to informal business enterprises especially on waste separation and recycling. The municipality should increase frequency of waste collection or provide central point waste facilities to business operators. / Environmental Sciences / M. Sc. (Environmental Science)
4

Household participation in domestic waste disposal and recycling in the Tshwane Metropolitan Area : an environmental education perspective

Kamara, Agnes Jonton 02 1900 (has links)
The aim of this study was to investigate the factors influencing household awareness and participation in domestic waste disposal and recycling, focusing on environmental educational (EE), wealth and location of suburb. The study was carried out in four suburbs in the Tshwane Metropolitan Area (TMA), namely Waterkloof, Lynnwood, Sunnyside and Mamelodi. A literature review was conducted, covering concepts of domestic waste management - waste prevention, collection, recycling and reuse, followed by household analysis using empirical data. The analysis shows that there is a low level of household awareness about the environmental implications of domestic waste management in TMA, and hence low level of participation in domestic waste sorting, disposal and recycling. Among relevant factors are the level of EE and income of the households across all suburbs. This calls attention to the need for strengthening EE not only in schools, but also in suburbs using both formal and informal outreach programmes. / Educational Studies / M. Ed. (Environmental Education)
5

Establishment of composting facilities on landfill sites

Du Plessis, Roelien 11 1900 (has links)
Waste minimisation is implemented worldwide and has become an urgent priority in South Africa as evidenced in the promulgated National Environmental Management Waste Act (2008). The most common waste disposal method in South Africa is by landfill, which is unacceptable. Local municipalities have made little progress towards waste minimisation. The aim of this study was to present a solution to waste minimisation for the City of Tshwane Metropolitan Municipality (CTMM) by determining the feasibility of establishing composting facilities on landfill sites. One third of all municipal waste consists of green waste, which is compostable and can be converted on landfill sites. Nine municipal landfill sites were screened. The four most feasible sites were evaluated further by applying identified parameters that address physical, social and operational requirements. It is a possible to establish composting facilities on all four sites investigated, with Hatherley ranking as the most suited. The findings of this study clearly provided the basic parameters and requirements for constructing a composting facility and practical procedures applicable within a South African context. The evaluation method used can be applied as a model to evaluate similar studies in other municipalities to aid them in the decision-making process for waste minimisation. / Environmental Management / M.A. (Environmental Management)
6

Household participation in domestic waste disposal and recycling in the Tshwane Metropolitan Area : an environmental education perspective

Kamara, Agnes Jonton 02 1900 (has links)
The aim of this study was to investigate the factors influencing household awareness and participation in domestic waste disposal and recycling, focusing on environmental educational (EE), wealth and location of suburb. The study was carried out in four suburbs in the Tshwane Metropolitan Area (TMA), namely Waterkloof, Lynnwood, Sunnyside and Mamelodi. A literature review was conducted, covering concepts of domestic waste management - waste prevention, collection, recycling and reuse, followed by household analysis using empirical data. The analysis shows that there is a low level of household awareness about the environmental implications of domestic waste management in TMA, and hence low level of participation in domestic waste sorting, disposal and recycling. Among relevant factors are the level of EE and income of the households across all suburbs. This calls attention to the need for strengthening EE not only in schools, but also in suburbs using both formal and informal outreach programmes. / Educational Studies / M. Ed. (Environmental Education)
7

Establishment of composting facilities on landfill sites

Du Plessis, Roelien 11 1900 (has links)
Waste minimisation is implemented worldwide and has become an urgent priority in South Africa as evidenced in the promulgated National Environmental Management Waste Act (2008). The most common waste disposal method in South Africa is by landfill, which is unacceptable. Local municipalities have made little progress towards waste minimisation. The aim of this study was to present a solution to waste minimisation for the City of Tshwane Metropolitan Municipality (CTMM) by determining the feasibility of establishing composting facilities on landfill sites. One third of all municipal waste consists of green waste, which is compostable and can be converted on landfill sites. Nine municipal landfill sites were screened. The four most feasible sites were evaluated further by applying identified parameters that address physical, social and operational requirements. It is a possible to establish composting facilities on all four sites investigated, with Hatherley ranking as the most suited. The findings of this study clearly provided the basic parameters and requirements for constructing a composting facility and practical procedures applicable within a South African context. The evaluation method used can be applied as a model to evaluate similar studies in other municipalities to aid them in the decision-making process for waste minimisation. / Environmental Management / M.A. (Environmental Management)
8

Implementation of waste management policy in the City of Tshwane

Mokebe, Thabo 06 1900 (has links)
The City of Tshwane is the capital city of South Africa and the administrative seat of government. The status of the city as a capital creates high expectations on the level of basic service delivery on municipal services like waste management, water, electricity and health. The city is currently facing challenges in relation to the delivery and implementation of waste management services. In an attempt to find solutions to the waste management challenges of the city a study on the implementation of waste management services is undertaken by the researcher. The study identifies and then analyses the underlying reasons for the challenges faced by the City of Tshwane in the implementation of waste management services. This aim of this study was to investigate and to analyse the implementation of waste management services in the City of Tshwane’s historically disadvantaged areas with particular focus on Region 01, 02, 05 and 07. In order to investigate these factors, a descriptive research design and qualitative methodology was used which related to convenient and purposive sampling of officials and data collected from fifteen (15) respondents using semi structured interviews and observations. The study also utilised document analysis to interpret the challenges and solutions related to the research topic. It emerged from the study that a lack of capacity and resources to perform efficient waste management services underpinned many of the challenges experience by the city. The failure of the city to ensure community participation and involvement is another reason for the challenges the city faces in waste management. Furthermore, the lack of policy implementation and enforcement is an element that the city needs to deeply consider. When policy is crafted with input of residents and when there is a social contract as to the roles and responsibilities of each party, it becomes easier to enforce. Some of the challenges that the city faces with regards to waste management can also be attributed to political interference and institutional deficiencies. Beyond issues like capacity, institutions and others, the city will continue to face challenges if it does not seriously invest in innovation and new technologies that address its generic and specific conditions in relation to the management of waste. The marginalisation and selective enforcement of by-laws on the informal recyclers and reclaimers are some of the findings of the study that demonstrate the inability of the city to find specific solutions to specifics regions on waste management .These challenges resulted in the peri urban regions like region 01, 02, 05 and 07 not receiving quality and consistent waste management services. The study recommends some interventions to address the waste management problems identified in the highlighted regions and entire City of Tshwane. Some of the recommended interventions include, assessing the unique characteristics of the communities and regions with a view of identifying waste management solutions that will be relevant for the circumstances and profile of such regions, ensure that proper and adequate resources, infrastructure and capacity is deployed to such areas to improve the waste services in those areas. Furthermore aggressive education and awareness campaigns conducted in partnership with communities will be critical to change people’s attitude towards waste management and a clean environment. This can be achieved through a consultative process led by the City of Tshwane in partnership with its communities and enforced through a progressive and incentive driven by-law system. / Public Administration and Management / M.P.A. (Master of Public Administration)

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