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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
11

Progressive conservatism in Brazil : Oliveira Viana, Roberto Simonsen and the social legislation of the Vargas regime, 1930-1945

Howes, Robert 1976 (has links)
This thesis analyses the development of the ideas and theories of Oliveira Viana (1883-1951) and Roberto Simonsen (1889-1948), placing them in their historical context and showing how they illuminated and influenced contemporary trends in Brazilian thought and governmental policy, with particular emphasis on the social legislation passed by the Vargas regime between 1930 and 1945. The two theorists are characterised as progressive conservatives, since they aimed to preserve the existing hierarchical structure of society by adopting new, progressive methods. Both men advocated increasing the role of the state: Viana was particularly influential in the early 1930s in the area of political theory and institutional reform, whilst Simonsen, as an early proponent of economic development, came into his own in the late 1930s and early 1940s when the Estado Novo turned tentatively towards a policy of industrialisation. The Introduction gives a brief outline of Brazil's political and economic history up to 1945 and the intellectual currents of the 1910s and 1920s. Chapters 1 to 3 analyse Oliveira Viana's position as a social scientist and a political theorist, including an account of his critique of liberal democracy and its workings in Brazil, and his practical suggestions for political reform. Chapter 4 discusses the conservative motives which underlay Vargas's adoption of a policy of social legislation. Chapter 5 describes the evolution of Roberto Simonsen's ideas, showing how his theories on economic development were presented as a response to social unrest, while Chapter 6 analyses the development of his ideas on the need for industrialisation to serve the home market and the difficulties which he faced in having them accepted as official policy. Chapter 7 deals with Viana's ideas on the social question during his period as juridical consultant of the Ministry of Labour (1932- 1940), and the policy which he and other functionaries evolved towards Brazil's syndical structure. Chapters 8, 9 and 10 then give an account of the direct impact of Viana and Simonsen on three specific areas of social policy: the Labour Justice law and the reform of the syndical legislation in 1938-40, the minimum wage and industrial training. Finally, Chapters 11 and 12 describe Simonsen's ideas on economic planning and American aid.
12

Colonel Elisha Jones of Weston and the crisis of colonial government in Massachusetts, 1773-1776

Jones Baker, D. W. 1979 (has links)
This paper contends that without the Tory dimension no factual account of the Civil War in 1774 and the beginning of the Revolution in the Colony of Massachusetts Bay is possible, and that there is no better way of demonstrating actuality in this, as in other historic problems, than by direct examination of events through the lives of those who shaped them. This paper is the first historic study of the last and most crucial crisis of Colonial Government in Massachusetts - that is, from the setting up of the Committees of Correspondence in 1772-3 (the Whig extension from Boston of single-party rule by caucus to supplant the Constitution-Charter of 1691 and political pluralism in Town Meetings) to the strategic and military victory in the Siege of Boston of rebellion, created and manipulated by a dedicated Radical minority, and the enforced withdrawal of the Loyalists, the Loyal Militia(including Brig. Timothy Ruggles' corps of Loyal Associators) with the Regular forcer, to Halifax, I. arch 17,1776-as it happened, and from the experience of one of the most active and prominent of the largely Tory soldier-Representative-magistrates that since the Mayflower Compact served as the leaders of Massachusetts: Col. Elisha Jones (1710-1776), the "famous" Tory squire of Weston, on Charles River in Middlesex County and less than a day's walk from Boston. None more than Col. Jones stood for one of the two main Tory political groups in Massachusetts in the 1770's, the "Reformers, " so often at cross-purposes with the Hutchinson- Sewall-0liver faction that supported the status quo and the undivided sovereignty of Parliament, and who when the Civil War began at the time of the Powder Alarm,Sept.1,1774, left their homes for Boston, and the fighting of the Whig political mobs with their weapons of assault and violence to property to men like Col. Jones, Brig. Ruggles, and Col. Thomas Gilbert and the Regulars, and who became the early "refugees"in England. Col. Jones was a leader of the "Reformist" Tories that supported the Constitution-Charter of 1691, and government by law and precedent in the manner of Blackstone(a best-seller in the Colonies) and who worked for the greatest measure of "home rule" and needed reforms(such as adequate pay for judges)initiated whenever possible by the General Court. Their "Charter" was the Middlesex Magistrates' Address to Gov. Hutchinson of May, 1774(signed by Col. Jones and possibly drafted by him) which looked toward an association with Britain based upon mutual economic and political interest: concepts so forward-looking as not to he fully accepted until the 20th century, and so dangerous in their own time as to merit oblivion by the Whigs and vetoes for such measures as the "Prevention of Bribery and Corruption" bill by Hutchinson. It was the "Reformers"that carried the burden of resisting the Whig assault upon the rule of law and maintenance of public order. One of fewer than a dozen Tories elected to the House in 1773 and 1774, Col. Jones opposed all the unconstitutional Whig measures, including Committees of Correspondence, impeachment of Chief Justice Oliver and the Continental Congress. One of the last magistrates to hold court he raised (Nov 1774) one of the first military Tory Corps of the War. Driven to Boston (Dec 1774) by the mobs, he served under Gage and Howe as Forage Commissioner, and three of his sons with Ruggles' Associators. Col. Jones died in Boston just before the Evacuation, but the ideas he fought for were taken to Nova Scotia and Upper Canada by five of his Tory sons, who with their descendants took a distinguished part of the foundation of a new Empire and independent nation of Canada.
13

The Rules of the Game : Alleudes Chile, the United States and Cuba, 1970-1973

Harper, Tanya 2008 (has links)
No description available.
14

Commercial organization in the late eighteenth century Atlantic world : a comparative analysis of the British and French West Indian trades

Forestier, Albane 2009 (has links)
No description available.
15

The embassy of James Bryce in the United States, 1907-1913

Neary, P. 1965 (has links)
No description available.
16

The English press and the American civil war

Keiser, Thomas Jack 1971 (has links)
No description available.
17

Urban slavery in nineteenth-century Rio de Janeiro

Soares, Luis Carlos 1988 (has links)
No description available.
18

The growth of the East Indian community in British Guiana, 1880-1920

Ramnarine, Tyran 1977 (has links)
No description available.
19

Dark clouds gathering : contact, conflict, and cultural dislocation on the Anglo-Iroquois frontier, 1740s-1770s

Danvers, Gail D. 2001 (has links)
No description available.
20

Economy, Ideology and Political Struggle in the Andean Highlands: A Study of Peasant Protest in Southern Peru

Sanchez, R. 1977 (has links)
No description available.

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