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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
1

The wheelchair accessibility of Bloemfontein's guest houses and hotels

Posholi, M., Kokt, D. January 2011 (has links)
Published Article / Wheelchair friendliness is an issue that needs to be taken very serious. Awareness should be created so that the owners of the accommodation establishments have a complete knowledge about wheelchair friendliness. The population of the study covered 16 guest houses and 16 hotels in Bloemfontein and only 11 agreed to participate. Other guest house owners were not interested in the participation. Among those guest houses that participated, only few had wheelchair facilities. It showed that there is a lot of ignorance concerning the topic because other guest house owners thought they were wheelchair friendly, just because there is no step at the entrance. A checklist was compiled from literature and adminstered at each estabilshment.
2

Enabling Accessible Pedagogy - Resource Sharing for CLAPS 2016

Kumbier, Alana, Starkey, Julia 02 1900 (has links)
Resources shared as part of the Enabling Accessible Pedagogy facilitated discussion. Critical Librarianship & Pedagogy Symposium, February 25-26, 2016, The University of Arizona.
3

Minimum Energy Transport Adaptability

Rendall, Stacy Michael January 2012 (has links)
In the face of future transport energy supply constraints it is imperative that planners understand transport energy adaptability within cities. This thesis presents for the first time an analysis methodology for mapping the spatial distribution of limits to energy adaptability. Termed the Minimum Energy Transport Adaptability (META) method, it characterises urban areas, synthesising a situation in which households have enacted all viable transport energy adaptations. The output is an estimation of the minimum possible transport energy required by households in meeting their day-to-day activity requirements. The META method combines elements of energy engineering, accessibility modelling and transport activity modelling. The analysis makes use of national household travel surveys to define the frequency of activity access and ability to use modes at the national level, and study area Geographical Information Systems (GIS) data for origins, facilities and transport networks. Two case studies have been investigated in New Zealand, the cities of Christchurch and Hamilton, and have shown that most residential areas in these cities do not limit the adaptive options available to residents. However, outlying areas, satellite towns and lifestyle properties consistently require large amounts of transport energy consumption and thus limit the ability of residents to adapt to future energy constraints. The META model enables, for the first time, the effects of future transport energy constraints to be mapped, visualised, quantified, and consequently considered in the planning process.
4

Studies in museum language

Coxall, Helen January 1995 (has links)
No description available.
5

A follow-up study of graduates and non-graduates of certain schools for crippled children in the United States and Canada during the ten year period 1944 through 1954

Cameron, Jean Sutherland January 1957 (has links)
Thesis (Ed.M.)--Boston University
6

The Accessibility of the Jamaican and Aruban All-Inclusive Resorts

Hano, Katarzyna January 2012 (has links)
An impairment is an attribute of an individual whereas the extent to which it is a disability is influenced strongly by the environment in which they operate which is a product of society. This research focuses on people with physical impairments in the belief that improvements in accessibility for them will decrease the disabling effects of their impairments and improve accessibility for all. A social rather than a medical approach to impairments is adopted. This approach focuses on the abilities of people with impairments and stresses that limitations are placed upon them as a result of the attitudes and actions of the broader society, of which they are a part, the majority of which is comprised of able-bodied people. Thus, this thesis examines the physical barriers experienced by physically impaired individuals and the attitudes held towards them by service providers. The concepts of universal design and barrier-free design are reviewed and used to formulate a comprehensive checklist which is used to measure and compare the state of accessibility of selected resorts in the Caribbean. This checklist is simple to administer and can be used by non-experts. It can also be used to inventory other structures in addition to resorts. The availability of such a tool will enable researchers and facility managers to record information systematically on touristic and other sites. Jamaican and Aruban all-inclusive resorts are examined to obtain a better understanding of the accessibility provisions at all-inclusive resorts for physically disabled individuals. This study is the first to examine all-inclusive resorts for their accessibility. The researcher conducted facility inventories and interviews with staff and guests at three facilities in the Caribbean in order to obtain an understanding of the physical accessibility of the resorts, the staff’s attitudes towards physically impaired guests, as well as guests’ reflections on the treatment of physically impaired individuals by staff. The results show that physical accessibility in the resorts was mixed but that staff attitudes are generally positive. The Accessibility and Attitudinal Barriers Model (AABM) is used to examine the four main areas which need to be improved in order to make traveling for physically disabled persons a pleasure and not a problem. These are accommodation, transportation, recreation activities and staff attitudes. The current research has extended the application of the model both by applying it to all-inclusive resorts and also by incorporating different kinds of information, including that collected by the check list discussed above. This has extended the application of the model and has provided greater understanding of the role of the different sectors of the model in contributing to accessible tourism. Through defining the group under discussion and explaining their difficulties, and examining the barriers that they experience and related policies, the thesis outlines the steps that already have been taken and that need to be taken to make traveling for pleasure available to all individuals. The creation of more accessible tourism establishments could help to remove doubts concerning whether or not impaired tourists travel and whether or not the number of such travelers is increasing. Often, there is a belief that few impaired individuals travel due to financial constraints and this is one of the main reasons why accessibility has not been a priority. It can be argued that, since there are few accessibility provisions for the impaired in tourism establishments, few impaired people travel. Once this barrier is eliminated, it would be more clear whether it is finances that restrict impaired tourists from traveling or whether it is the inaccessible nature of the physical space which leads them to stay home.
7

Operating Performance of Automated Pedestrian Detectors at Signalized Intersections

Foord, Jonathan Gregory 19 January 2011 (has links)
The research analyzes the operating performance of three commercially available curbside automated pedestrian detectors (APDs) (infrared and stereovision, passive infrared, and a microwave detector) for the actuation of pedestrian walk phases as a function of winter weather and temperature variations at signalized intersections in terms of detector selectivity and sensitivity. Two sites were selected for field analysis in Winnipeg, Manitoba Canada. Based on a sample of 8,225 detections at the two sites, the research found that overall sensitivity rates of the APDs ranged from 62 to 98 percent while selectivity rates were generally below 50 percent. Regardless of site, the infrared/video APD had the second highest sensitivity and highest selectivity rates of all APDs analyzed. The infrared APD had the highest sensitivity and lowest selectivity rates, and the microwave APD had the lowest sensitivity and second highest selectivity.
8

Operating Performance of Automated Pedestrian Detectors at Signalized Intersections

Foord, Jonathan Gregory 19 January 2011 (has links)
The research analyzes the operating performance of three commercially available curbside automated pedestrian detectors (APDs) (infrared and stereovision, passive infrared, and a microwave detector) for the actuation of pedestrian walk phases as a function of winter weather and temperature variations at signalized intersections in terms of detector selectivity and sensitivity. Two sites were selected for field analysis in Winnipeg, Manitoba Canada. Based on a sample of 8,225 detections at the two sites, the research found that overall sensitivity rates of the APDs ranged from 62 to 98 percent while selectivity rates were generally below 50 percent. Regardless of site, the infrared/video APD had the second highest sensitivity and highest selectivity rates of all APDs analyzed. The infrared APD had the highest sensitivity and lowest selectivity rates, and the microwave APD had the lowest sensitivity and second highest selectivity.
9

The Accessibility of the Jamaican and Aruban All-Inclusive Resorts

Hano, Katarzyna January 2012 (has links)
An impairment is an attribute of an individual whereas the extent to which it is a disability is influenced strongly by the environment in which they operate which is a product of society. This research focuses on people with physical impairments in the belief that improvements in accessibility for them will decrease the disabling effects of their impairments and improve accessibility for all. A social rather than a medical approach to impairments is adopted. This approach focuses on the abilities of people with impairments and stresses that limitations are placed upon them as a result of the attitudes and actions of the broader society, of which they are a part, the majority of which is comprised of able-bodied people. Thus, this thesis examines the physical barriers experienced by physically impaired individuals and the attitudes held towards them by service providers. The concepts of universal design and barrier-free design are reviewed and used to formulate a comprehensive checklist which is used to measure and compare the state of accessibility of selected resorts in the Caribbean. This checklist is simple to administer and can be used by non-experts. It can also be used to inventory other structures in addition to resorts. The availability of such a tool will enable researchers and facility managers to record information systematically on touristic and other sites. Jamaican and Aruban all-inclusive resorts are examined to obtain a better understanding of the accessibility provisions at all-inclusive resorts for physically disabled individuals. This study is the first to examine all-inclusive resorts for their accessibility. The researcher conducted facility inventories and interviews with staff and guests at three facilities in the Caribbean in order to obtain an understanding of the physical accessibility of the resorts, the staff’s attitudes towards physically impaired guests, as well as guests’ reflections on the treatment of physically impaired individuals by staff. The results show that physical accessibility in the resorts was mixed but that staff attitudes are generally positive. The Accessibility and Attitudinal Barriers Model (AABM) is used to examine the four main areas which need to be improved in order to make traveling for physically disabled persons a pleasure and not a problem. These are accommodation, transportation, recreation activities and staff attitudes. The current research has extended the application of the model both by applying it to all-inclusive resorts and also by incorporating different kinds of information, including that collected by the check list discussed above. This has extended the application of the model and has provided greater understanding of the role of the different sectors of the model in contributing to accessible tourism. Through defining the group under discussion and explaining their difficulties, and examining the barriers that they experience and related policies, the thesis outlines the steps that already have been taken and that need to be taken to make traveling for pleasure available to all individuals. The creation of more accessible tourism establishments could help to remove doubts concerning whether or not impaired tourists travel and whether or not the number of such travelers is increasing. Often, there is a belief that few impaired individuals travel due to financial constraints and this is one of the main reasons why accessibility has not been a priority. It can be argued that, since there are few accessibility provisions for the impaired in tourism establishments, few impaired people travel. Once this barrier is eliminated, it would be more clear whether it is finances that restrict impaired tourists from traveling or whether it is the inaccessible nature of the physical space which leads them to stay home.
10

The feasibility of providing a college education at Boston University for the physically handicapped class-attending student

Welsh, Margaret Jane January 1960 (has links)
Thesis (Ed.M.)--Boston University

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