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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
1

Pointing angle and timing verification of the geoscience laser altimeter using a ground-based detection system

Magruder, Lori Adrian, January 2001 (has links)
Thesis (Ph. D.)--University of Texas at Austin, 2001. / Vita. Includes bibliographical references. Available also from UMI/Dissertation Abstracts International.
2

Pointing angle and timing verification of the geoscience laser altimeter using a ground-based detection system /

Magruder, Lori Adrian, January 2001 (has links)
Thesis (Ph. D.)--University of Texas at Austin, 2001. / Vita. Includes bibliographical references (leaves 162-167). Available also in a digital version from Dissertation Abstracts.
3

A new approach to the determination of a mean sea surface model using multi-satellite altimeter data

Kim, Hyo-Jin 03 August 2015 (has links)
Models for the mean sea surface (MSS) are created by combining and interpolating on a specified spatial grid inhomogenous data sets from different satellites with different ground track coverage. There are various approaches in which the sea surface height (SSH) data from different satellites can be combined to create an accurate reference surface. The orbit errors (especially from the early missions) need to be reduced, and systematic biases between different satellites can be decreased by re-processing them using the improved models and geophysical corrections. In this research, a new method for the data adjustment (or error reduction), which attempts to compensate for both long-wavelength orbit errors and systematic biases, simultaneously and efficiently. The approach is based on using an accurate sea surface profile as a reference surface for the integration process. The new data adjustment technique is based on along-track SSH gradients computed for each satellite, which are integrated along-track with initial values obtained by dual crossover computation with respect to an accurate set of sea surface heights. The accurate Jason-1 SSH data were used to determine the reference surface, and a total of 5 different satellites (Geosat ERM, ERS-2, T/P, Envisat and ERS-1 geodetic mission) data were adjusted to the Jason-1 SSH data. After editing, the new homogeneous SSH datasets were averaged into mean SSH profiles. Then, they were gridded into a 5-minute resolution mean sea surface over the global ocean within ±60º latitudes, as defined by the Jason-1 mean profile, using a 2-D spline interpolation in tension with Green’s function approach. The new gridded mean sea surface, named CSRMSS14 was validated by three comparisons. First, it was compared with two accurate altimeter data sets: 7-year Jason-1 and 8-year Envisat mean profiles. Second, two recent MSS models, DNSC08 and DTU10, were compared to investigate the accuracy of CSRMSS14. Third, a somewhat independent test is obtained by comparing a 2-year Jason-2 mean profile with the three MSS models (CSRMSS14, DTU10 and DNSC08), since Jason-2 data were not used in their construction. These three validations demonstrated that CSRMSS14 mean sea surface model obtained with this new approach is comparable in accuracy to DNSC08 and DTU10. / text
4

Pointing angle and timing verification of the geoscience laser altimeter using a ground-based detection system

Magruder, Lori Adrian, 1971- 28 March 2011 (has links)
Not available / text
5

Sensitivity of satellite altimetry data assimilation on a Naval Anti-Submarine Warfare Weapon System

Mancini, Steven 09 1900 (has links)
Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited / The purpose of this thesis is to assess the benefit of assimilating satellite altimeter data into the Modular Ocean Data Assimilation System (MODAS). To accomplish this, two different MODAS fields were used by the Weapon Acoustic Preset Program (WAPP) to determine suggested presets for a Mk 48 variant torpedo. The MODAS fields differ in that one uses altimeter data assimilated from three satellites while the other uses no altimeter data. The metric used to compare the two sets of outputs is the relative difference in acoustic coverage area generated by WAPP. Output presets are created for five different scenarios, two Anti- Surface Warfare scenarios and three Anti-Submarine Warfare scenarios, in each of three regions: the East China Sea, the Sea of Japan, and an area south of Japan that includes the Kuroshio current. Analysis of the output reveals that, in some situations, WAPP output is very sensitive to the inclusion of the altimeter data because of the resulting differences in the subsurface predictions. The change in weapon presets could be so much that the effectiveness of the weapon might be affected. / Lieutenant Commander, United States Navy
6

A noise modulated radar altimeter

Banin, Louis Joseph, 1933- January 1961 (has links)
No description available.
7

Satellite altimeter remote sensing of ice caps

Rinne, Eero Juhani January 2011 (has links)
This thesis investigates the use of satellite altimetry techniques for measuring surface elevation changes of ice caps. Two satellite altimeters, Radar Altimeter 2 (RA-2) and Geoscience Laser Altimeter System (GLAS) are used to assess the surface elevation changes of three Arctic ice caps. This is the first time the RA-2 has been used to assess the elevation changes of ice caps - targets much smaller than the ice sheets which are the instrument’s primary land ice targets. Algorithms for the retrieval of elevation change rates over ice caps using data acquired by RA-2 and GLAS are presented. These algorithms form a part of a European Space Agency (ESA) glacier monitoring system GlobGlacier. A comparison of GLAS elevation data to those acquired by the RA-2 shows agreement between the two instruments. Surface elevation change rate estimates based on RA-2 are given for three ice caps: Devon Ice Cap in Arctic Canada (−0.09 ± 0.29 m/a), Flade Isblink in Greenland (0.03 ± 0.03 m/a) and Austfonna on Svalbard (0.33 ± 0.08 m/a). Based on RA-2 and GLAS measurements it is shown that the areas of Flade Isblink below the late summer snow line have been thinning whereas the areas above the late summer snow line have been thickening. Also GLAS observed dynamic thickening rates of more than 3 m/a are presented. On Flade Isblink and Austfonna RA-2 measurements are compared to surface mass balance (SMB) estimates from a regional atmospheric climate model RACMO2. The comparison shows that SMB is the driver of interannual surface elevation changes at Austfonna. In contrast the comparison reveals areas on Flade Isblink where ice dynamics have an important effect on the surface elevation. Furthermore, RACMO2 estimates of surface mass budget at Austfonna before the satellite altimeter era are presented. This thesis shows that both traditional radar and laser satellite altimetry can be used to quantify the response of ice caps to the changing climate. Direct altimeter measurements of surface elevation and, in consequence volume change of ice caps, can be used to improve their mass budget estimates.
8

The development and use of satellite remote sensing techniques for the monitoring and hydrological modelling of the Sudd Marshes

Bound, Alice Jayne January 1999 (has links)
No description available.
9

The resolution capability of single and multiple satellite altimeter missions

Greenslade, Diana 17 October 1996 (has links)
Graduation date: 1997
10

Sensitivity of satellite altimetry data assimilation on a Naval Anti-Submarine Warfare Weapon System /

Mancini, Steven. January 2004 (has links) (PDF)
Thesis (M.S. in Meteorology and Physical Oceanography)--Naval Postgraduate School, Sept. 2004. / Thesis Advisor(s): Peter C. Chu. Includes bibliographical references (p. 73). Also available online.

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