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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
1

An investigation of analogical retrieval and mapping in complex reasoning situations /

Blanchette, Isabelle. January 2000 (has links)
The goal of the research reported in this thesis is to explore analogical reasoning in complex situations. In three manuscripts, novel aspects of analogy use are investigated. In Manuscript 1, analogies used in a political campaign were analyzed with the framework developed in the analogical reasoning literature. Results show a number of novel features of analogy use. The majority of source analogs used were not superficially similar to the target problem, most of the mappings between source and target were implicit, and emotion appeared to be an important feature in the selection of source analogs. In Manuscript 2, three experiments were conducted that explored some of the effects uncovered in the first study. In these experiments, participants were asked either to generate their own source analogs in relation to a target problem or to retrieve a source from a predetermined set. Results show that when generating their own sources, people are not constrained by superficial similarity. However, when asked to retrieve from a predetermined set of sources, participants retrieve based on surface similarity. These results suggest that previous studies may have underestimated people's ability to use structural features in analogical retrieval. The research reported in Manuscript 3 explores the impact of analogical inferences on the representations of target problems. Descriptions of target problems were presented followed by potential source analogs. Results show that people engage in analogical mapping and draw inferences. These inferences, that were not presented, are incorporated in people's representation of the target and cannot be differentiated from information that was actually presented. People falsely recognize analogical inferences as having been presented when in fact they had not. Results from all these studies are discussed in terms of the novel insights they contribute to the analogy literature and in terms of their implications for theoretical models of
2

An investigation of analogical retrieval and mapping in complex reasoning situations /

Blanchette, Isabelle. January 2000 (has links)
No description available.
3

Der Begriff der "analogia relationis" als methodischer Ausgangspunkt einer theologischen Ethik

Okayama, Kōtarō, January 1973 (has links)
Thesis (doctoral)--Universität Hamburg, 1973. / Vita. Includes bibliographical references (p. 349-361).
4

Relational models of feature based concept formation, theory-based concept formation and analogical retrieval/mapping /

Gray, Brett. January 2003 (has links) (PDF)
Thesis (Ph. D.)--University of Queensland, 2003. / Includes bibliographical references.
5

Der Begriff der "analogia relationis" als methodischer Ausgangspunkt einer theologischen Ethik

Okayama, Kōtarō, January 1973 (has links)
Thesis (doctoral)--Universität Hamburg, 1973. / Vita. Bibliography: p. 349-361.
6

The effect of experiential analogies on consumer perceptions and attitudes

Goode, Miranda R. 05 1900 (has links)
What does driving a sports car have to do with a first kiss, shopping in New York or purchasing a pair of designer shoes? These comparisons were used in a recent ad campaign for the Alfa Romeo Spider and are prime examples of an experiential analogy. The predominance of experiential analogies in recent advertisements suggests that they are persuasive. Yet understanding what comes to mind when consumers process these comparisons remains to be investigated. By drawing on analogy and consumption experience literatures, an important moderator of analogical persuasiveness is identified, preference for the base experience, and the influence of emotional knowledge transfer on consumer attitudes is explored. Substantial focus has been devoted to understanding how consumers learn and are persuaded by functional analogies. Digital cameras have been compared to computer scanners, personal digital assistants to secretaries and off-line web readers to VCRs. These functional analogies differ substantially from experiential analogies where consumers are encouraged to compare two experiences. Three studies were conducted to investigate what contributes to the persuasive effect of an experiential analogy. Study 1 explored how base preference moderates the effect of emotional knowledge transfer on consumer attitudes. The findings suggest that an analogy is maximally persuasive for those who like the experience that an advertised product is compared to and cognitively associate a high number of emotions with the advertised product. In Study 2, a cognitive load manipulation was used to provide additional support for the effect of emotional knowledge transfer and base preference on consumer attitudes. Study 3 explored another important moderator, emotional soundness, specific to the persuasiveness of an experiential analogy. The findings from Study 3 further replicated the effect of base preference and emotional knowledge transfer on consumer attitudes and demonstrate that there needs to be sufficient underlying similarities in order for one to infer that the comparison experience and the advertised target product would have emotions in common with one another. The role of affect in the processing of an experiential analogy was also investigated.
7

The effect of experiential analogies on consumer perceptions and attitudes

Goode, Miranda R. 05 1900 (has links)
What does driving a sports car have to do with a first kiss, shopping in New York or purchasing a pair of designer shoes? These comparisons were used in a recent ad campaign for the Alfa Romeo Spider and are prime examples of an experiential analogy. The predominance of experiential analogies in recent advertisements suggests that they are persuasive. Yet understanding what comes to mind when consumers process these comparisons remains to be investigated. By drawing on analogy and consumption experience literatures, an important moderator of analogical persuasiveness is identified, preference for the base experience, and the influence of emotional knowledge transfer on consumer attitudes is explored. Substantial focus has been devoted to understanding how consumers learn and are persuaded by functional analogies. Digital cameras have been compared to computer scanners, personal digital assistants to secretaries and off-line web readers to VCRs. These functional analogies differ substantially from experiential analogies where consumers are encouraged to compare two experiences. Three studies were conducted to investigate what contributes to the persuasive effect of an experiential analogy. Study 1 explored how base preference moderates the effect of emotional knowledge transfer on consumer attitudes. The findings suggest that an analogy is maximally persuasive for those who like the experience that an advertised product is compared to and cognitively associate a high number of emotions with the advertised product. In Study 2, a cognitive load manipulation was used to provide additional support for the effect of emotional knowledge transfer and base preference on consumer attitudes. Study 3 explored another important moderator, emotional soundness, specific to the persuasiveness of an experiential analogy. The findings from Study 3 further replicated the effect of base preference and emotional knowledge transfer on consumer attitudes and demonstrate that there needs to be sufficient underlying similarities in order for one to infer that the comparison experience and the advertised target product would have emotions in common with one another. The role of affect in the processing of an experiential analogy was also investigated.
8

Tuk-Tuk: a unified account of similarity judgment and analogical mapping

Larkey, Levi Benjamin 28 August 2008 (has links)
Not available / text
9

Design-by-analogy and representation in innovative engineering concept generation

Linsey, Julie Stahmer, 1979- 29 August 2008 (has links)
Design-by-analogy is an important tool for engineers seeking innovative solutions to design problems. A new method for systematically guiding designers in seeking analogies, the WordTree Design-by-Analogy Method, was created based knowledge gained from a series of experiments and prior literature. The WordTree Method linguistically re-represents the design problem and leads the designer to unexpected, novel analogies and analogous domains. A controlled experiment and the applications of the method to a number of engineering projects prove the method's value. Designers implementing the method identify a greater number of analogies. Application of the method to a set of engineering project resulted in unexpected, novel analogies and solutions. A set of experiments to more deeply understand the individual cognitive and the group social process employed during analogical design guides the development of the WordTree Design-by-Analogy Method. A series of three experiments shows the effects of the problem representation and how the analogy is initially learned on a designers' ability to use the analogy to solve a future design problem. The effect of the problem representation depends on how the analogy is initially learned. Learning analogies in more domain-general representations facilitates later retrieval and use. A fourth experiment explored group brainwriting idea generation techniques including 6-3-5, Gallery, C-Sketch and Brainsketching through a 3 X 2 factorial experiment. The first factor controls how teams represent their ideas to each other, words alone, sketches alone or a combination. The second factor determines how teams exchanged ideas, either all the ideas are displayed on the wall or sets of ideas are rotated between team members. The number, quality, novelty and variety of ideas are measured. The greatest quantity of ideas is produced when teams use a combination of words and sketches to represent their ideas and then rotationally exchange them. This corresponds to a hybrid 6-3-5/C-Sketch method.
10

Design-by-Analogy Using the WordTree Method and an Automated WordTree Generating Tool

Oriakhi, Edgar Velazquez 2011 May 1900 (has links)
Design-by-Analogy is an approach that is widely embraced by engineers and designers seeking innovative designs. The identification of analogies for use in engineering design problems is usually a spontaneous action that is brought about by accident and not by a systematic design process applied during the idea generation stage of new product development. A Design-by-Analogy method developed to lead designers systematically to analogies that can be useful for solving design problems is the WordTree Method. The WordTree Method uses the semantic relationships between verbs, extracted from design problems, to lead engineers and designers to potentially useful analogies. The WordTree Method is a relatively new design method, and as with any new design method, there is room for improvement. In this thesis, a tool called WordTree Express (WTE) was developed to automate the generation of the database-based WordTrees used during the application of the WordTree Method. This tool (WTE) showed, from an experiment, that its implementation had a positive effect on the opinions of the engineers and designers who used it for solving a design problem. The effects found from surveying the participants suggested that the participants were more likely to apply the method in their future design problems with the WTE tool than when they applied the method without the WTE tool. Although the WTE tool did not show statistical significance (p<0.1) in increasing the number of analogies identified by the participants, compared to the non-automated method, it did enable the process of identifying analogies to be done faster. Tools designed to perform tasks faster and more efficiently usually tend to have a positive effect on its users. Different ontologies were studied for their value in the application to Design-by-Analogy in engineering. Recommendations for further work advancing the WordTree Method and contributions to Design-by-Analogy are presented in the future work section.

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