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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
1

Community Foundations: The Asset-based Development of an Australian Community Organisation as a Foundational Source for Sustainable Community Development.

Bryant, Sharon, mindstream@optusnet.com.au January 2007 (has links)
This study seeks to uncover the opportunities and challenges in building the foundations for sustainable community development at the local level, by enhancing the capacity of a community organisation. Challenging the traditional needs-based focus of community development, the research builds from the work of Kretzmann and McKnight by applying an asset-based approach to both community development and capacity building of community organisations. This study thus shifts the focus of community development away from its traditional application on
2

The Relationship between coping with HIV&AIDS and the asset-based approach

Ferreira, Ronel 09 November 2006 (has links)
The descriptive purpose of this study was to explore and describe the manner in which a South African informal settlement community is coping with HIV&AIDS, by relying on existing assets and local resources. The intervention-related purpose was to explore how an activist intervention research approach might facilitate change and empower an informal settlement community in relation to community members’ ways of coping with HIV&AIDS. Theoretically the study conceptualised asset-based coping, thus adding to available literature on the asset-based approach and coping. The practical value lies in documenting an example of one community’s coping with HIV&AIDS, which may inform other communities during future capacity building initiatives. Furthermore, the study provides methodological knowledge concerning the potential value of employing activist intervention research within the context of coping with HIV&AIDS. The conceptual framework of the study constituted the HIV&AIDS pandemic, coping theory and the asset-based approach. I followed a qualitative research approach guided by an interpretivist epistemology. I employed an instrumental case study design, applying PRA (Participatory Reflection and Action) principles. I purposefully selected the case (a South African informal settlement community and primary school through which I entered the community), as well as the participants (educators, community members and other stakeholders of the community). Data collection consisted of an intervention (focus groups combined with workshops that relied on PRA informed techniques), interviews, observation, a field journal and visual data collection techniques. Four prominent themes emerged subsequent to inductive data analysis. The community experienced certain challenges and stressors within the context of HIV&AIDS. Besides general challenges like poverty, unemployment and at-risk sexual behaviour, community members displayed vulnerability with regard to HIV&AIDS and identified challenges when supporting other people living with HIV&AIDS. Various assets and potential assets were identified in and around the community, upon which the community might rely in coping with the challenges associated with HIV&AIDS. Thirdly, the community displayed certain trends in coping with HIV&AIDS, relying on community-based coping to deal with being infected with HIV or living with AIDS, coping with other community members living with HIV&AIDS, or caring for children orphaned due to HIV&AIDS. Finally, participants’ active involvement in the intervention research resulted in unchanged-, as well as changed coping strategies. Based on the findings, I conceptualised the construct asset-based coping, defining it as the ability to deal with challenges, by identifying and mobilising existing assets, as well as external resources available. I proposed asset-based coping as one possibility of coping with HIV&AIDS. In terms of research methodology, I combined research and intervention in an innovative manner, by developing and employing an activist intervention research approach. Active participation and their role as research partners enabled educators to experience increased levels of self-worth, take agency and be empowered in the context of community-based coping with HIV&AIDS. / Thesis (PhD (Educational Psychology))--University of Pretoria, 2007. / Educational Psychology / unrestricted
3

Educators' experiences of inclusive learning contexts : an exploration of competencies / Ishmael Magare

Magare, Ishmael January 2008 (has links)
The successful implementation of an inclusive education system relies heavily on educators, since they engage daily in reciprocal interactions with learners. The implementation of an inclusive education system in South Africa was part of the educational reforms that occurred after 1994. Inclusive education promotes the full personal, academic and proficient development of all learners and is based on values such as human dignity, the achievement of equality and the advancement of human rights and freedom. Although most educators were only trained for either mainstream education or specialised education, they now had to cope not only with the diverse challenges posed by individual learner barriers, but also with broader systemic issues such as non-protective legislation and policy, cultural prejudice, inaccessible and unsafely built infrastructure, and lack of parental involvement. The complexity of the interactive relationships between different systems such as learners, educators, families, schools and the learning context were recognised and therefore the ecosystemic perspective was applied. The purpose of the research was to explore the experiences of educators in ordinary schools regarding the challenges involved in inclusive learning contexts, and to identify the competencies that they apply to deal with some of these challenges. A qualitative research design was chosen, using a case study to obtain an in-depth understanding of educators' experiences in a specific context. The study was conducted in the North-West province at Klerksdorp Secondary School. The school is characterised by its cultural diversity among educators and learners. Various contextual and micro systemic barriers that threatened an enabling learning environment were observed. Seven educators, one male and six female, participated in the research after ethical approval was obtained from the Ethics Committee of the University, the Department of Education, the Head of the school as well as the individual participants. Participants were involved in the research through purposive sampling. Three methods of gathering data were used in this research, namely written assignments that were completed by the participants; in-depth follow-up interviews and a focus group with all the participants. Thematic content analysis was used to identify themes and subthemes in the educators' descriptions of their experiences. The findings indicated that educators demonstrated competencies that enabled them to support learners and initiate and form collaborative relationships in an inclusive learning environment. The competencies associated with supporting learners included unconditional acceptance, focussed observations, adaptation and flexibility and motivating and encouraging learners to achieve. The competencies associated with the initiation and forming of collaborative relationships included involving parents in the learning process and forming collaborative relationships with colleagues. The findings clearly indicated that although educators had not received formal training in dealing with learners challenged with barriers to learning, they intuitively explored various ways of co-creating enabling learning contexts. Various implications for the Department of Education and school management teams are suggested. The Department of Education's training policy should acknowledge teachers' existing competencies. Educators should form part of advisory committees that could advise the Department of Education about the development of inclusive learning contexts. School management teams and institutional support teams could emphasise collective planning for inclusion so that educators' expertise is explored and further developed. / Thesis (M.A. (Psychology))--North-West University, Potchefstroom Campus, 2009.
4

Educators' experiences of inclusive learning contexts : an exploration of competencies / Ishmael Magare

Magare, Ishmael January 2008 (has links)
The successful implementation of an inclusive education system relies heavily on educators, since they engage daily in reciprocal interactions with learners. The implementation of an inclusive education system in South Africa was part of the educational reforms that occurred after 1994. Inclusive education promotes the full personal, academic and proficient development of all learners and is based on values such as human dignity, the achievement of equality and the advancement of human rights and freedom. Although most educators were only trained for either mainstream education or specialised education, they now had to cope not only with the diverse challenges posed by individual learner barriers, but also with broader systemic issues such as non-protective legislation and policy, cultural prejudice, inaccessible and unsafely built infrastructure, and lack of parental involvement. The complexity of the interactive relationships between different systems such as learners, educators, families, schools and the learning context were recognised and therefore the ecosystemic perspective was applied. The purpose of the research was to explore the experiences of educators in ordinary schools regarding the challenges involved in inclusive learning contexts, and to identify the competencies that they apply to deal with some of these challenges. A qualitative research design was chosen, using a case study to obtain an in-depth understanding of educators' experiences in a specific context. The study was conducted in the North-West province at Klerksdorp Secondary School. The school is characterised by its cultural diversity among educators and learners. Various contextual and micro systemic barriers that threatened an enabling learning environment were observed. Seven educators, one male and six female, participated in the research after ethical approval was obtained from the Ethics Committee of the University, the Department of Education, the Head of the school as well as the individual participants. Participants were involved in the research through purposive sampling. Three methods of gathering data were used in this research, namely written assignments that were completed by the participants; in-depth follow-up interviews and a focus group with all the participants. Thematic content analysis was used to identify themes and subthemes in the educators' descriptions of their experiences. The findings indicated that educators demonstrated competencies that enabled them to support learners and initiate and form collaborative relationships in an inclusive learning environment. The competencies associated with supporting learners included unconditional acceptance, focussed observations, adaptation and flexibility and motivating and encouraging learners to achieve. The competencies associated with the initiation and forming of collaborative relationships included involving parents in the learning process and forming collaborative relationships with colleagues. The findings clearly indicated that although educators had not received formal training in dealing with learners challenged with barriers to learning, they intuitively explored various ways of co-creating enabling learning contexts. Various implications for the Department of Education and school management teams are suggested. The Department of Education's training policy should acknowledge teachers' existing competencies. Educators should form part of advisory committees that could advise the Department of Education about the development of inclusive learning contexts. School management teams and institutional support teams could emphasise collective planning for inclusion so that educators' expertise is explored and further developed. / Thesis (M.A. (Psychology))--North-West University, Potchefstroom Campus, 2009.
5

Perceptions of Capability Among Female Stroke Survivors in the Context of Disaster Risk Reduction

Ananthamoorthy, Nilani 22 August 2018 (has links)
Women and persons with disabilities are at increased risks of experiencing negative health outcomes during and after disasters. The Sendai Framework (2015), published by the United Nations Office for Disaster Risk Reduction, highlights the need to strengthen disaster risk reduction (DRR) among populations at disproportionate risk, using an all-of-society approach that is inclusive and engaging. This research investigated the perceptions of capability among female stroke survivors, in the context of DRR. The purpose of this study was to 1) examine the role of asset literacy in the social construction of capability and lived experiences of female stroke survivors and 2) create an opportunity for female stroke survivors to share their lived experiences among themselves, and members of the stroke and DRR communities. Four women were recruited through snowball sampling. Study participants were invited to join a PhotoVoice project – a participatory method in which survivors were asked to respond to prompts using photography. Data was analyzed using qualitative, thematic analysis. Study results revealed that perceptions of capability in DRR for stroke survivors was rooted in the context of their recovery. Participants discussed 4 sets of recovery and DRR assets: 1) physical, 2) social, 3) energy and 4) personal characteristics. Autonomy was identified as a valued recovery outcome, and as needed to establish self-efficacy and adaptive capacity to cope with disasters. Social participation and asset literacy can support one another, and may enhance disaster resilience. An important aspect of Photovoice initiatives is sharing the messages with important stakeholders, as identified by the participants. This research has been shared at the annual international EnRiCH meeting (2018). We are currently planning a photo exhibit to be held in the fall of 2018. Overall, this research shows how creative tools (i.e. Photovoice, asset-mapping) can be used to foster social participation, and include populations at disproportionate risk in the DRR discussion.
6

Parent and caregiver experiences of a higher education rural school partnership providing educational psychology services

Grobler, Lidalize January 2017 (has links)
The purpose of this study was to explore and describe parents' and caregivers' retrospective experiences of a higher education-rural school partnership providing educational psychology services. The study aimed to inform knowledge on community engagement with schools and forms part of the broad FLY (Flourishing Learning Youth) community engagement initiative that has been ongoing since 2006. The current study utilised interpretivism as metatheory and qualitative research as methodological paradigm. An instrumental case study design was utilised, with a specific higher education-rural school partnership conveniently sampled. Subsequently twelve parents or caregivers to a child/ren who participated in the relevant community engagement initiative at any time since 2006, were purposefully selected. Two field visits were taken for data collection purposes; the first included Participatory Reflection and Action (PRA) discussions between participants, whilst the second visit entailed member checking. I relied on written recording of the participants' dialogue on PRA posters, audio recordings of their poster presentations, observations throughout the process, photographs taken and a reflective journal as data collection and documentation strategies. From thematic data analysis two main themes emerged. Firstly, participants identified the partnership as a platform of educational opportunity, which allowed for children's development on a cognitive and socio-emotional level. Secondly, participants emphasised their hope for the continuation and growth of the partnership in the future. Participants expect the partnership to broaden in multiple ways, such as involving parents and caregivers, providing them with a safe space to voice their opinions, and incorporating a parental guidance element. Based on the findings of the study I can conclude that according to parents and caregivers, community engagement with schools provides an opportunity for the mobilisation of children assets to result in their positive development. Furthermore, when additionally activating the assets of the parents, community engagement can be strengthened. / Dissertation (MEd)--University of Pretoria, 2017. / Educational Psychology / MEd / Unrestricted
7

Identifying personal and environmental assets to enrich pre-school learning within a culture of poverty : an ethnographic study

De Wet, Annari 15 March 2005 (has links)
This research entails an ethnographic study of a community that has a culture of poverty. The aim of this research was to identify personal and environmental assets that could be used to enrich pre-school learning within a culture of poverty. These assets included anything that could be used for pre-school learning, observations, field notes, interviews, photographs and artefacts were used to study the community while participating as a member of the community. Numerous assets were identified. Seven main themes were derived from a collective summary of data. The main themes were: children, culture, man-made products, the natural environment, local institutions and citizens’ associations, crafts and caretakers. The themes were expanded into categories and sub-categories. Each sub-category is discussed as an asset in the light of various activities the asset can be used for, the skills and the learning outcomes practiced by these activities. Using these assets as stated by the Revised National Curriculum, all the learning outcomes for the Foundation Phase were covered. Literature that relates to the theme of this research study is incorporated to verify the results from this study. The results of this research study suggest that this particular community is rich with potential, opportunities and material to enrich the pre-school learning of children. / Dissertation (MEd (Educational Psychology))--University of Pretoria, 2004. / Educational Psychology / unrestricted
8

Exploring facilitation skills in asset-based transdisciplinary teamwork

Ferreira, Judite 17 March 2005 (has links)
Much has been researched on how to manage and participate in teams, as well as on teamwork in transdisciplinary and early intervention groups. However, no single source adequately details the skills needed to facilitate such a unique group as that of the asset-based transdisciplinary team. A limitation in the theoretical body of knowledge regarding this subject matter spurred the purpose of this study to explore the facilitation skills conducive to asset-based transdisciplinary teams. A conceptual framework was created from the researcher’s perspective of the theoretical knowledge researched and acquired. Applying an interpretative epistemology, the instrumental case study was chosen as research design to explore groups of transdisciplinary team members. Two focus group interviews were conducted, transcribed, qualitatively analysed with the supplements of field notes and coded with the help of two independent coders. Theoretical assumptions were tested, interrelations shown, categories and themes short-listed and criticisms from the participants considered. It was found that skills alone do not suffice to equip members in their facilitation of asset-based transdisciplinary teams. Attitudes of involvement, flexibility, support, transparency and trust; approaches that are asset-based, narrative, holistic and family-centred and possessing knowledge of diversity, ethics, teamwork and discipline expertise were considered paramount to the competence of a facilitator. It is recommended that in future research of facilitation, attention be given not only to the skills acquired, but also to the knowledge, attitudes and approaches needed. Combination of categories, integrating skills, attitudes, approaches and knowledge should also be investigated. It is recommended that the role of the caregiver be given greater status among health professions and that the findings of this study be applied in the pre- and in-service training of prospective health professionals and facilitators. Asset-based theory was informed by emphasising the importance of facilitation skills, and acquiring appropriate attitudes, approaches and knowledge in order to ensure successful implantation of those skills. The inclusion of role release underscored the need to facilitate networking and encourage shared leadership and the narrative approach also presented itself as a possible addition to asset-based theory. Finally, as a development of the collaborative project in Early Childhood Intervention, interpretations from focus group interviews as well as research in literature were used for the Masters degree in Early Childhood Intervention (MECI) in the Educational Psychology elective module. / Dissertation (MEd (Educational Psychology))--University of Pretoria, 2004. / Educational Psychology / unrestricted
9

Investigating the application of the asset-based approach in career facilitation

Coetzee, Sonja 20 December 2006 (has links)
The purpose of this study was to investigate the asset-based approach as alternative in career facilitation. In traditional career counselling, the career counsellor is seen as an expert and one-stop service provider that matches clients to careers. Alternatively, an asset-based career facilitator aims at facilitating sustainable career development skills by means of applying asset-based principles such as collaboration and shared responsibility. In this study, client-partners were viewed from several complementary theoretical frameworks, namely the asset-based approach, bio-ecological model of human development, Positive Psychology and the process of career facilitation. In addition, phenomenology was selected as meta-theory to guide the instrumental case study. Five career seeking client-partners between the ages of 16 and 18 were chosen according to criteria, and took part in an approximately six week asset-based career facilitation process. Client-partners were aware that the process was under study and willingly reflected on the process after completion. Thematic analysis resulted in the following themes: firstly, it appeared that individual client-partner profiles impacted on the application of asset-based principles. Factors pertaining to individual client profiles are personality traits, age, unique family dynamics, career interests and previous career assessment experiences. Secondly, applying asset-based principles seemed to impact on the career facilitation process with regard to the challenging role of the asset-based career facilitator as well as advantages and disadvantages of applying such principles. Thirdly, it looked as if the entrenched nature of the old paradigm or medical model impacted on the process as some client-partners still preferred the expert matching done in traditional career counselling and resisted being a partner in the career facilitation process. Findings suggest indicators and contra-indicators concerning the application of asset-based principles and strategies in career facilitation, as well as implicate recommendations with regard to training and further research. / Dissertation (MEd (Educational Psychology))--University of Pretoria, 2005. / Educational Psychology / unrestricted
10

Using the Herrmann whole brain® model for mentoring academic staff

Goode, Heather A. January 2014 (has links)
My research provides an account of evaluating my mentoring practice using an Action Research design complemented by a mixed methods approach and the Hermann Whole Brain® Model (Herrmann, 1995). I explored how I can transform my mentoring practice using the principles of Whole Brain® thinking and how I can contribute to enriching the professional development of academic staff. My research has proceeded from an innovative idea and existing practice as an asset-based approach (Du Toit, 2009). By utilising an Action Research design my research articulates the construction of my understanding of mentoring of other academic staff in their professional practice. I followed a constructivist approach as used by Piaget (1952, 1970) that is considered an appropriate epistemological underpinning of Action Research. My research design shows thinking style flexibility as an action researcher in that I have drawn on each quadrant of the Whole Brain® Theory as developed by Herrmann (1995). This enabled me to construct meaning with my peer mentees through the assessing of practice-based evidence, engagement and reflection. As my goal in mentoring is to assist in developing independent reflexive practitioners, I have chosen to use the constructs contribute to and catalyse to express my awareness that responsibility for professional development remains with the individual and that a mentor is not the only source of professional development in the context of a Private Higher Education Institution. I have found that my peer mentees have differing thinking style preferences and varying professional experiences that required of me to engage with each in distinct ways to support the development of their professional practices. I position Whole Brain® Mentoring as a practice of mentoring that utilises multiple strategies for professional learning, both formal and non-formal, to engage the thinking preferences and disinclinations of mentees to catalyse the professional development of both the mentor and mentees. Many of my peer mentees perceive themselves as mentors, both of students and, in some cases, of other academic staff (our peers) as well. There is evidence that I utilise multiple strategies to facilitate professional learning and contribute to the professional development of peer mentees and that they have contributed to mine. My research provides evidence that I have become a more reflective practitioner, able to transform my Whole Brain® Mentoring Practice. / Dissertation (MEd)--University of Pretoria, 2014. / tm2015 / Humanities Education / MEd / Unrestricted

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