• Refine Query
  • Source
  • Publication year
  • to
  • Language
  • 75
  • 66
  • 10
  • 3
  • 1
  • 1
  • 1
  • 1
  • Tagged with
  • 197
  • 197
  • 61
  • 58
  • 51
  • 36
  • 34
  • 31
  • 30
  • 27
  • 23
  • 21
  • 20
  • 19
  • 19
  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
1

Review of intensive assessment recommendations conducted at the Assistive Technology and Assessment Center (ATAC), University of Wisconsin--Stout

Miess, Karla Jo. 2001 (has links) (PDF)
Thesis--PlanB (M.S.)--University of Wisconsin--Stout, 2001. Includes bibliographical references.
2

The Attentive Hearing Aid: visual selection of auditory sources

Hart, Jamie Lauren 26 September 2007 (has links)
We present the Attentive Hearing Aid, a system that uses eye input to amplify the audio of tagged sound sources in the environment. A multidisciplinary project, we use the latest technology to take advantage of the social phenomenon of turn-taking in human-human communication, and apply this in a new kind of assistive hearing device. Using hearing-impaired participants, we evaluated the use of eye input for switching between sound sources on a screen in terms of switch time and the recall of audiovisual material. We compared eye input to a control condition and two manual selection techniques: using a remote to point at the target on the screen, and using buttons to select the target. Results show that in terms of switch time, Eyes were 73% faster than Pointing and 58% faster than Buttons. In terms of recall, Eyes performed 80% better than Control, 54% better than Buttons, and 37% better than Pointing. In a post-evaluation user experience survey, participants rated Eyes highest in “easiest”, “most natural”, and “best overall” categories. We present the implications of this work as a new type of assistive hearing device, and also discuss how this system could benefit non-hearing-impaired individuals. Thesis (Master, Computing) -- Queen's University, 2007-09-26 13:46:25.789
3

Design and Evaluation of a Vocalization Activated Assistive Technology for a Child with Dysarthric Cpeech

Thalanki Anantha, Nayanashri 2013 (has links)
Communication disorders affect one in ten Canadians and the incidence is particularly high among those with Cerebral Palsy. A vocalization-activated switch is often explored as an alternative means to communication. However, most commercial speech recognition tools to date have limited capability to accommodate dysarthric speech and thus are often prematurely abandoned. We developed and evaluated a novel vocalization-based access technology as a writing tool for a pediatric participant with cerebral palsy. It consists of a high quality condenser headmic, a custom classifier based on Gaussian Mixture Modeling (GMM) and Mel-frequency Cepstral Coefficients (MFCC) as features. The system was designed to discriminate among five vowel sounds while interfaced to an on-screen keyboard. We used response efficiency theory to assess this technology in terms of goal attainment and satisfaction. The participant’s primary goal to reduce switch activation time was achieved with increased satisfaction and lower physical effort when compared to her previous pathway.
4

Design and Evaluation of a Vocalization Activated Assistive Technology for a Child with Dysarthric Cpeech

Thalanki Anantha, Nayanashri 2013 (has links)
Communication disorders affect one in ten Canadians and the incidence is particularly high among those with Cerebral Palsy. A vocalization-activated switch is often explored as an alternative means to communication. However, most commercial speech recognition tools to date have limited capability to accommodate dysarthric speech and thus are often prematurely abandoned. We developed and evaluated a novel vocalization-based access technology as a writing tool for a pediatric participant with cerebral palsy. It consists of a high quality condenser headmic, a custom classifier based on Gaussian Mixture Modeling (GMM) and Mel-frequency Cepstral Coefficients (MFCC) as features. The system was designed to discriminate among five vowel sounds while interfaced to an on-screen keyboard. We used response efficiency theory to assess this technology in terms of goal attainment and satisfaction. The participant’s primary goal to reduce switch activation time was achieved with increased satisfaction and lower physical effort when compared to her previous pathway.
5

Evaluation of the Use of a Touchscreen Assistive Device for People with Dementia: A Pilot Study

Miriam, Goubran 2017 (has links)
Abstract Background. People with dementia (PWD) have difficulty adhering to their medication regiment and maintaining a sense of identity and social connectedness. Moreover, caregivers constantly worry about PWD especially when they are left home alone. Objective. To examine the usefulness and usability of the Claris Companion (CC) in assisting PWD and their caregivers. Results. Most participants found some of the communication functions, leisure functions and reminder functions difficult to use. They found that the email/text messaging, photos and videos function useful. Surprisingly, they did not find the reminder functions useful. Conclusion. This study demonstrated how the CC could help PWD regain their sense of identity and feel more socially connected to their family and friends. Furthermore, it also demonstrated how the CC gives peace of mind to caregivers in leaving PWD home alone while they are at work or running errands. Résumé Contexte. Les personnes avec la démence (PAD) ont de la difficulté à adhérer à leur régiment de médicaments ainsi que maintenir leur sens d’identité et de sociabilité. De plus, leurs proche-aidants s’inquiètent constamment de la PAD, spécialement lorsque qu’ils ou qu’elles sont à la maison tout(e)s seul(e)s. Objectif. D’examiner l’utilité et l’utilisabilité du Claris Companion (CC) pour assisté la PAD et son proche-aidant. Résultats. La plupart des participants ont trouvé les fonctions de communication, loisirs et de rappels difficiles à utilisés. Ils ont trouvé la fonction de messages courriel/SMS, les photos et les vidéos utiles. Étonnamment, ils n’ont pas trouvé les fonctions de rappels utiles. Conclusion. Cette étude démontre comment le CC peut aider la PAD à reprendre leur sens d’identité et sociabilité. De plus, ça démontre aussi comment le CC donne aux aidants naturels un sens de tranquillité d’esprit lors qu’ils ou qu’elles sont au travail ou font des courses.
6

Assessing the use of auditory graphs for middle school mathematics

Chew, Yee Chieh 2014 (has links)
This dissertation addresses issues related to teaching and learning middle-school mathematical graphing concepts and provides an in-depth analysis on the impact of introducing a new assistive technology in a visually impaired classroom. The motivation, design, implementation, and deployment of the Graph and Number line Input and Exploration (GNIE) software, an auditory graphing tool that enables students with visual impairment to navigate and interact with a coordinate plane or number line graph is presented. Results include a discussion about how a computer-based auditory graphing software can be a beneficial supplement to aiding teachers and students with vision impairment with middle-school based graphing principles. This work also demonstrates that auditory graphing software support collaboration between students of different levels of vision loss and that bone-conduction headphones can be used with software to perform concurrent think aloud protocols without degradation of qualitative data.
7

Comparing satisfaction with occupational performance using a pushrim-activated power-assisted wheelchair and a power wheelchair among task-specific power wheelchair users

Giesbrecht, Edward Mark 12 July 2006 (has links)
The manual wheelchair (MWC) and power wheelchair (PWC) each present advantages and disadvantages to participation and occupational performance. Consequently, some individuals choose to use both devices, depending upon the activity. A pushrim-activated, power-assisted wheelchair (PPW) may provide an alternative to the PWC for these users. This study utilized a two-phase, mixed methods design, comparing the performance and satisfaction of wheelchair users carrying out self-selected activities with their current PWC and with a PPW. There was no statistically significant difference in outcome measures between the PWC and PPW; however, many participants reported a preference for the PWC. Less accessible environments, particularly when transporting a wheelchair, were identified as opportunities for PPW use. Rather than replacing the PWC for all of their identified activities, participants indicated the PPW improved upon the MWC. As a result, participants expressed a willingness to try more (and new) activities, including some previously performed with the PWC. October 2006
8

An Evaluation of the Allocation of Funding for Assistive Technology: A case study

Ollis, Cindy L. 1 May 2009 (has links)
Although benefits of assistive technology (AT) to people with disabilities are widely apparent, barriers, primarily funding, still inhibit access to needed AT. All agencies receiving federal funding are required to show no discrimination with regard to age, race, disability, and gender. This case study of a state run agency providing funding for AT to enable independent living among people with disabilities involved analyzing spending data from 2003 2008 to determine who used the fund, what was purchased, and whether it was equitably distributed according to age, ethnicity, gender, and population density. Additionally variables predictive of amount spent per person were also sought. Results indicated the fund was equitably distributed according to ethnicity and gender, but not age and population density. Age, gender, population density, and device type were found to have main effects with an interaction between device type and primary cause of disability in predicting the amount spent per person. (210 pages)
9

Design of a Multiple-User Intelligent Feeding Robot for Elderly and Disabled

Pourmohammadali, Homeyra 17 May 2007 (has links)
The number of elderly people around the world is growing rapidly. This has led to an increase in the number of people who are seeking assistance and adequate service either at home or in long-term- care institutions to successfully accomplish their daily activities. Responding to these needs has been a burden to the health care system in terms of labour and associated costs and has motivated research in developing alternative services using new technologies. Various intelligent, and non-intelligent, machines and robots have been developed to meet the needs of elderly and people with upper limb disabilities or dysfunctions in gaining independence in eating, which is one of the most frequent and time-consuming everyday tasks. However, in almost all cases, the proposed systems are designed only for the personal use of one individual and little effort to design a multiple-user feeding robot has been previously made. The feeding requirements of elderly in environments such as senior homes, where many elderly residents dine together at least three times per day, have not been extensively researched before. The aim of this research was to develop a machine to feed multiple elderly people based on their characteristics and feeding needs, as determined through observations at a nursing home. Observations of the elderly during meal times have revealed that almost 40% of the population was totally dependent on nurses or caregivers to be fed. Most of those remaining, suffered from hand tremors, joint pain or lack of hand muscle strength, which made utensil manipulation and coordination very difficult and the eating process both messy and lengthy. In addition, more than 43% of the elderly were very slow in eating because of chewing and swallowing problems and most of the rest were slow in scooping and directing utensils toward their mouths. Consequently, one nurse could only respond to a maximum of two diners simultaneously. In order to manage the needs of all elderly diners, they required the assistance of additional staff members. The limited time allocated for each meal and the daily progression of the seniors??? disabilities also made mealtime very challenging. Based on the caregivers??? opinion, many of the elderly in such environments can benefit from a machine capable of feeding multiple users simultaneously. Since eating is a slow procedure, the idle state of the robot during one user???s chewing and swallowing time can be allotted for feeding another person who is sitting at the same table. The observations and studies have resulted in the design of a food tray, and selection of an appropriate robot and applicable user interface. The proposed system uses a 6-DOF serial articulated robot in the center of a four-seat table along with a specifically designed food tray to feed one to four people. It employs a vision interface for food detection and recognition. Building the dynamic equations of the robotic system and simulation of the system were used to verify its dynamic behaviour before any prototyping and real-time testing.
10

THE WRITE STUFF: ASSISTIVE TECHNOLOGY AND ITS IMPACT ON EARLY WRITERS

ROBB, Lauren Nicole 24 April 2011 (has links)
This mixed methods study examined assistive technology and its role in the world early writers. It investigated the function of word predictive and speech synthesis software in the early primary, mainstream classroom. A technology based writing intervention with 27 first grade students was carried out to assess how the use of Co:writer software affected the content of student writing. It looked at how the length of the writing sample, word use and sentence complexity was affected by this writing intervention. It also investigated how students interacted with the software and how they felt about its effect on their writing. The hypothesis was that the use of assistive technology while writing would aid students in creating more sophisticated, content rich writing samples and give students a positive feeling about their writing. Using a pre-post design, participant writing samples were analyzed for length, word use and sentence complexity. Targeted interviews and field notes revealed how students interacted with the software and how they felt about its effect on their writing. The data shows that within this study participants improved the length, and sentence complexity in their written samples. Qualitatively participants reported that the software helped to improve their vocabulary, length of writing sample, spelling, reading and editing. This study lays groundwork for more research into the use of assistive writing technology in early mainstream participants. Thesis (Master, Education) -- Queen's University, 2011-04-24 02:12:01.196

Page generated in 0.0925 seconds